adjusting banshee shock
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  1. #1
    Senior Member Skyking's Avatar
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    OK; I've looked and I can't find anything on this forum about how to adjust the banshee shock. Which knob does what? Since the spring is so light; should i adjust the preload ring all the way up? Do I need to do anything about over-travel?

  2. #2
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    You won't get that thing to behave itself with the stock Banshee spring. The Banshee has a linkage swingarm. The spring is pure mush when running it direct.



    The good news is that it will control a heavier spring without overcoming the valving. Works pretty well with a stock TW spring if you can devise a spacer. But make sure you limit it to stock TW travel or it will overtravel on compression and go byebye.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Skyking's Avatar
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    Thanks LB, I was planning on using the stock spring. Any suggestions on what to use for a spacer, and limiter? I could also use some tips on the preload, compression, and rebound adjusters.

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  5. #4
    Senior Member lizrdbrth's Avatar
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    I worked one out in ABS plumbing stuff for size. Never committed it to urethane because my extended swingarm cured my shock problem for now.



    Gizmow and a few others have done it a few different ways. Pour through the shock threads and you should find a method you can live with.



    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

    Powdercoated '87 frame, extended swingarm, YZ fork legs, ATV tire, 14/55, XT350 tank, spliced quick-release seat, disc brake conversion, beeg headlight, beeger rack, Lizrdcooler, Lizrdventz and bunch of other stuff all covered in invisible ink.

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  6. #5
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    For all of my Spring mods, I as well used 'plastic' as a starting point when shimming the spring. Here are a few pictures giving you an idea of what I did to address the issues. The first spacers were made of ABS that I 'double walled', then something I cut out of an old cutting-board. Once I was sure of what I needed, I used some pipe I had to make a spacer with a broader base foot-print and had a machine shop turn it down to look more 'in scale' with my project. To protect against the dangerous "Coil Binding" I bought a couple of front end Urethane bushings from an auto parts store. Bored out the ID to match the shock rod OD then slit one side of the bushing as to allow me to open it enough to slip over the rod. I then wrapped a bit of wire around it to hold it in place. Clearly, none of this should be done by someone that is inclined to ride aggressively, not keeping in mind the potential limitations of their rear shock. I figure I am safe for one very hard landing, then I would likely need to inspect and or rewire the bushing. For me, that's ok because I am a slow trail rider and stay well within the 'limits' of my very comfortable suspension. Good luck, stay safe and Happy Holiday. Gerry



















    Take care my Friend.........

  7. #6
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    Sorry Kwizard can't help you with that part. Think I gleaned some shock adjustment insight from a forum that had lots of Banshee users. I adjusted my shock to my liking over a weekend of riding and like so many things, let the memory fade into obscurity. Should you recapture that info. Some photos of knobs and dials with function captions may make a good post for others. That Banshee body is a nice foundation for the rear suspension on the TW. Good luck. Gerry
    Take care my Friend.........

  8. #7
    Member crjanow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwizard
    Thanks Giz. Good info. Now; how about the pre-load, compression, and rebound adjustments? As you can tell; I've never had to deal with these. So tell me like your talking to a 6th grader.
    i dont have one now but i have owned several banshees in the early nineties. the preload is the nut on the spring,the compression is the knob on the reservoir,the rebound is the knob at the bottom of the shock. hope this helps.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Gerry's Avatar
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    Thanks so much Richie... Can we assume that clockwise constricts valving slowing down movement in compression and rebound? It would seem that "pre-load" would be handled by compressing the spring by adding tension. Tightening the rings on the bottom of the shock body seems to be the only way of doing this. Is that what you meant, or will turning that knurled top knob on the center shaft do the same thing? Gerry
    Take care my Friend.........

  10. #9
    Member crjanow's Avatar
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    yeah, turning the knob on the reservoir clockwise will make the compression of the shock harder. the spanner nuts on the shock body that is against the spring will adjust preload on the spring for the amount of sag you want and will also affect ride height. the knob on the bottom of the shock at the mounting bolt will change how fast the shock will extend after it has been compressed. just turn it all the way one way and push the bike down and it will come up fast and all the way the other way it will come up very slowly. just adjust it to your liking.

  11. #10
    Member crjanow's Avatar
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    o.k. i just saw on another thread that the banshee shock is mounted upside down on the tw so keep that in mind on what i said.

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