Brake fluid and lithium grease
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  1. #1
    Member Dwight's Avatar
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    I have a 2010 TW200 with 6,200 mi. that I bought off of Craigs List about a year ago. I've had alot of fun with the bike and, with considerable help from this Forum, have upgraged the sprockets, chain, battery, side mirrors and rear tire. I also had to file down and hammer on an 18 mm socket to get the old oil plug out and replace with a new one. My issues now are the brake fluid reservoir cap screws and level indicator. Although the front brake works fine, I can not see any brake fluid through the circular window indicator. It looks like one of the prior owners tried to remove the cap screws, because they look to be about turned out. My question is, if I have to drill them out, where is a good place to get replacements. The manual I have is for the older front drum brake. When I get the cap off, can I just add some DOT4 brake fluid up to the lower level indicator? Are there any other factors I should be considering? Is there an update manual for the front disc brake?



    A second issue is what kind of lithum grease to use. The manual says a lithium soap. The stores sell oil base and plant base lithium grease. What do you folks use and any tips on how you apply it. Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member Point37's Avatar
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    here are the service and repair manuals...there is an 01 and newer maintenance manual but i've never downloaded it cause i have a 2000

    https://tw200forum.com/index.php?/top...epair-manuals/



    as far as OEM parts i get mine from here

    http://www.ronayers.com/Fiche/TypeID...TW200Z_TW200ZC

  3. #3
    Senior Member Point37's Avatar
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    i just downloaded the 01 and newer section to take a look and it recommends DOT 4 for the front brake

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  5. #4
    Senior Member rm_hm's Avatar
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    Synthetic Race Grease

    Used by Yamaha race teams, this 100% synthetic grease was designed to withstand extreme pressure and provide maximum lubrication from its treatment of special anti-wear agents. A lithium soap based grease built to withstand temeratures from -40°F ~ 500°F. Used where specified in the Service Manual to use grease "B" and grease "LS".






















    Lithium soap, often loosely referred to as "lithium grease", is a soap that is a lithium derivative. Lithium soaps are primarily used as components of certain lubricant greases.



    Soaps are salts of fatty acids. In the domestic setting, sodium-based and potassium-based soaps are commonly used as natural cleaning surfactants, but for lubrication and as form-release agents, soaps derived from lithium and calcium are used, due to their higher melting points, keeping them solid or semi-solid at higher temperatures. The most useful of the non-detergent soaps are those based on lithium, as they are free of corrosive properties. The main components of lithium soaps are lithium stearate and lithium 12-hydroxystearate. In addition to soap, soap-based lubricating greases also contain hydrocarbon oils and other components.[1]







    Lithium grease

    Most lubricating greases are mixtures of an oil and a soap. The soaps are dispersed into and viscosify oils to form the stable gels that are called greases. Grease made with lithium soap ("lithium grease") adheres particularly well to metal, is non-corrosive, may be used under heavy loads, and exhibits good temperature tolerance. It has a drip temperature of 190° to 220°C (350° to 400°F) and it resists moisture, so it is commonly used as lubricant in household products, such as electric garage doors, as well as in automotive applications, such as CV joints. Lithium-containing greases first appeared during World War II, and were perhaps the first large-scale commercial application of lithium compounds.



    Some formulations also include PTFE or other substances, such as molybdenum disulfide. For high-performance and higher-temperature applications, lithium greases have been superseded by other types of lubricants.[clarification needed][citation needed]





    Grease compatibility chart

    http://www.mindconne...reasecompat.htm









    Brake parts

    http://www.boats.net...NDER/parts.html





    Brake reading

    http://109.87.33.216...o/Yamaha/17.pdf



    Page 6-24



    Oh and don't forget to take the spark arrester screw out and put anti-seize on it.


  6. #5
    Senior Member mtkd's Avatar
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    I had to drill out the screws from my brake reservoir. For replacement screws I took the remains of the screws to the hardware store, matched the thread size and length and picked up screws for a couple cents.
    -Szj



    2001 TW

  7. #6
    Member Dwight's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for the quick response. I love this Forum.

  8. #7
    Senior Member frog13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post








    Synthetic Race Grease

    Used by Yamaha race teams, this 100% synthetic grease was designed to withstand extreme pressure and provide maximum lubrication from its treatment of special anti-wear agents. A lithium soap based grease built to withstand temeratures from -40°F ~ 500°F. Used where specified in the Service Manual to use grease "B" and grease "LS".






















    Lithium soap, often loosely referred to as "lithium grease", is a soap that is a lithium derivative. Lithium soaps are primarily used as components of certain lubricant greases.



    Soaps are salts of fatty acids. In the domestic setting, sodium-based and potassium-based soaps are commonly used as natural cleaning surfactants, but for lubrication and as form-release agents, soaps derived from lithium and calcium are used, due to their higher melting points, keeping them solid or semi-solid at higher temperatures. The most useful of the non-detergent soaps are those based on lithium, as they are free of corrosive properties. The main components of lithium soaps are lithium stearate and lithium 12-hydroxystearate. In addition to soap, soap-based lubricating greases also contain hydrocarbon oils and other components.[1]







    Lithium grease

    Most lubricating greases are mixtures of an oil and a soap. The soaps are dispersed into and viscosify oils to form the stable gels that are called greases. Grease made with lithium soap ("lithium grease") adheres particularly well to metal, is non-corrosive, may be used under heavy loads, and exhibits good temperature tolerance. It has a drip temperature of 190° to 220°C (350° to 400°F) and it resists moisture, so it is commonly used as lubricant in household products, such as electric garage doors, as well as in automotive applications, such as CV joints. Lithium-containing greases first appeared during World War II, and were perhaps the first large-scale commercial application of lithium compounds.



    Some formulations also include PTFE or other substances, such as molybdenum disulfide. For high-performance and higher-temperature applications, lithium greases have been superseded by other types of lubricants.[clarification needed][citation needed]





    Grease compatibility chart

    http://www.mindconne...reasecompat.htm









    Brake parts

    http://www.boats.net...NDER/parts.html





    Brake reading

    http://109.87.33.216...o/Yamaha/17.pdf



    Page 6-24



    Oh and don't forget to take the spark arrester screw out and put anti-seize on it.




    Excellant info Rich!.

  9. #8
    Senior Member frog13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight View Post
    I have a 2010 TW200 with 6,200 mi. that I bought off of Craigs List about a year ago. I've had alot of fun with the bike and, with considerable help from this Forum, have upgraged the sprockets, chain, battery, side mirrors and rear tire. I also had to file down and hammer on an 18 mm socket to get the old oil plug out and replace with a new one. My issues now are the brake fluid reservoir cap screws and level indicator. Although the front brake works fine, I can not see any brake fluid through the circular window indicator. It looks like one of the prior owners tried to remove the cap screws, because they look to be about turned out. My question is, if I have to drill them out, where is a good place to get replacements. The manual I have is for the older front drum brake. When I get the cap off, can I just add some DOT4 brake fluid up to the lower level indicator? Are there any other factors I should be considering? Is there an update manual for the front disc brake?



    A second issue is what kind of lithum grease to use. The manual says a lithium soap. The stores sell oil base and plant base lithium grease. What do you folks use and any tips on how you apply it. Thanks


    I would say if there was fluid in there, but you couldn't see it,then just add some DOT4 and check the brake to see if it is working properly...no air in the line.

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