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Thread: Snail chain adjusters

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    Senior Member Cerberus's Avatar
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    Snail chain adjusters

    While attempting to measure and figure out whether or not I need to adjust the chain I noticed that there are several notches/detente in between numbers on the snail adjusters. How does one know how many notches are needed to properly adjust a chain? Thank you for the help.

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    Junior Member philo's Avatar
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    It would depend on how loose or tight the chain is.
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    Senior Member Cerberus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philo View Post
    It would depend on how loose or tight the chain is.
    I think it’s still within spec but close to the 2.36” limit by owners manual. Thank you Phil.

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    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Just make sure it's not any more than 2 and 37 thousandths of an inch.
    Actually a 6 cm limit is good enough resolution, don't think Yamaha engineers were thinking of 61mm or 60.1 mm as being the precise limits of unacceptability. Unit conversion can be fraught with significant digit mis-representation.
    Thank goodness the US Congress passed the Metric Conversion Act in 1976 creating the US Metric Board and their never ending annual budgets as they continue their never ending struggle to implement the mandated unit change on a resisting public. Too bad "Resist" is so popular with Metric as well as other trends.
    Last edited by Fred; 01-12-2019 at 06:21 PM.
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  6. #5
    Senior Member Cerberus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    Just make sure it's not any more than 2 and 37 thousandths of an inch.
    Actually a 6 cm limit is good enough resolution, don't think Yamaha engineers were thinking of 61mm or 60.1 mm as being the precise limits of unacceptability. Unit conversion can be fraught with significant digit mis-representation.
    Thank goodness the US Congress passed the Metric Conversion Act in 1976 creating the US Metric Board and their never ending annual budgets as they continue their never ending struggle to implement the mandated unit change on a resisting public. Too bad "Resist" is so popular with Metric as well as other trends.
    Haha thank you Fred. Being from Europe the metric system is ingrained, it’s the other “ system “ I’m having trouble with, still after several decades Anyway, I won’t stress over the chain, I’m a “light user”, I do not beat anything up, I’ve got 300 miles on this thing, I’ll wait til 600 and let the dealer handle it. Thanks Fred, you and all the other “usual suspects” are an endless source of useful info. Great to b on this forum, thanks again.
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    Senior Member Michael Bryce Winnick's Avatar
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    A chain adjustment should not be a dealer job. There are even you tube videos on it that are TW specific. There is a teenage kid who does a great job and has fun while doing it. How much adjustment...enough to get the right slack. If you have stretched chain or neglected the adjustment, the chain will need more adjustment. Look at the amount of sag...that lets you know your chain needs adjusting. Just keep the marks on the snail even. Then people say that the factory chains are junk and the sprockets don't last. Every act of neglect leads to a more expensive part getting prematurely worn. These are TW's for crying out loud. Put down the purse and pick up some tools. You can't break one of these. My mechanical skills are a hate crime in some jurisdictions. I can't remember if there is a pin to pull (most times it is a crown nut with a pin), Crack nut loose, bang with a rubber mallet if you can't pull by hand, leave around two inches or so of play, and tighten her up. The you tube video even has the slack spec and the torque spec. Tools-ratchet, bit, rubber hammer, needle nose (I think), tape measure, and torque wrench if you really want to show you care. Otherwise torque it mentally to tight, but not too tight. The owner's manual has the specs. A bike jack is about thirty dollars on Amazon and it does make the job easier. (replace the cotter pin).
    Last edited by Michael Bryce Winnick; 01-13-2019 at 02:58 PM.
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    Senior Member TW Newb's Avatar
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    Wait... my book says 1.2 -1.6 inches.

    Edit: i watched tdub kids video and I see there is a discrepancy between manuals.

    Mine was about 2" and 1 notch put it right at the minimum. Guess it'll be awhile before I need to do it again lol.
    Last edited by TW Newb; 01-13-2019 at 11:45 AM.
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  9. #8
    Senior Member Cerberus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bryce Winnick View Post
    A chain adjustment should not be a dealer job. There are even you tube videos on it that are TW specific. There is a teenage kid who does a great job and has fun while doing it. How much adjustment...enough to get the right slack. If you have stretched chain or neglected the adjustment, the chain will need more adjustment. Look at the amount of sag...that lets you know your chain needs adjusting. Just keep the marks on the snail even. Then people say that the factory chains are junk and the sprockets don't last. Every act of neglect leads to a more expensive part getting prematurely worn. These are TW's for crying out loud. Put down the purse and pick up some tools. You can't break one of these. My mechanical skills are a hate crime in some jurisdictions. I can't remember if there is a pin to pull (most times it is a crown nut with a pin), Crack nut loose, bang with a rubber mallet if you can't pull by hand, leave an two inches or so of play, and tighten her up. The you tube video even has the slack spec and the torque spec. Tools-ratchet, bit, rubber hammer, needle nose (I think), tape measure, and torque wrench if you really want to show you care. Otherwise torque it mentally to tight, but not too tight. The owner's manual has the specs. A bike jack is about thirty dollars on Amazon and it does make the job easier. (replace the cotter pin).
    Thank you Michael, you are correct on all of it and I do appreciate your input. But....how do you know I have a purse?
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  10. #9
    Senior Member Michael Bryce Winnick's Avatar
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    Doesn't matter...just get out those tools and tear into the bike. Embrace every opportunity to take this thing apart just to see how it goes back together. You will not hurt anything. Most of all, enjoy yourself.
    TW-Brian and Darth like this.

  11. #10
    Senior Member Cerberus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bryce Winnick View Post
    Doesn't matter...just get out those tools and tear into the bike. Embrace every opportunity to take this thing apart just to see how it goes back together. You will not hurt anything. Most of all, enjoy yourself.
    Thank you Michael. I will be "tearing" tomorrow. If I get any leftover parts I'll ask for your help.
    Darth likes this.

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