Are the newer CV carbs able to handle storage and gas better
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Thread: Are the newer CV carbs able to handle storage and gas better

  1. #1
    Senior Member craig0ry's Avatar
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    Are the newer CV carbs able to handle storage and gas better

    Without fail every year someone leaves the gas on my 87. I have to do a full carb rebuild every spring, green jelly everywhere in the carb. I am so sick of rebuilding the carb. I want a bike that simply works.

    I’m considering either a new Van Van or TW. But if the newer TWs are still so sensitive to gasoline issues I absolutely do not want it.
    1987 - 68mm Wiseco, #116 main, #42 pilot, Lizrd oil cooler, saving up for the Web.

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    Senior Member Ski Pro 3's Avatar
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    Well, they are a carb and they will have the same fuel issues if it's left on and not used as you described. It's no worse or better than other bikes except for maybe the pilot circuit. Your best bet is probably to get a Chinese carb of eBay for around $25 and swap it out rather than take the time to clean the original one if you don't enjoy doing that sort of maintenance.
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    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    Why blame this on the carb? You answered your own question in the very first sentence, Someone left the gas on. It won't matter in the least if you have an old carb, newer one or even a FI Van Van if you insist upon running the same crappy fuel and it goes stale in the tank. Treating the fuel with some one of the stabilizing treatments could help and remembering to turn the petcock off might do some good but that green crud is from the fuel itself and has nothing to do with what type of carb or fuel injection system you have.

    GaryL
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    Senior Member RockyTFS's Avatar
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    Who is this someone? Tsk Tsk! If you can find some non-ethanol in the fall and use Stabil too your problem would be solved.
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    Senior Member Sthrnromr's Avatar
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    Stabil, Sea Foam, no ethanol and shutting petcock. That will all help you. You can always get really good at removing and soak cleaning or ultrasonic cleaning your carb ;p
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    Junior Member Shady Rascal's Avatar
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    I always leave gas in the carb in the winter. One time I shut it off and ran carbs dry in both my YFZ450's, and in the spring the needles were stuck. Had to pull the carbs out (real pain in those) and unstick them.

    Some Sta-Bil in the gas, leave it on, start the bikes once in a while through the winter, everything's happy. Works for me and I'm up north where we have a long winter.
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    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Odd.
    If it its indeed the owner that leaves the fuel turned on then the solution lies in new behavior, not a new bike.
    Draining the carb after turning the fuel supply off should be an integral part of the new behavior. Simply closing the petcock will not prevent the reported green jelly if it leaves the carb full of old fuel.
    Then owner will only have to deal with issues caused by a "dry" carb left in storage.

    Illinois weather is not so horrible so as to prevent periodic operation of the TW over the winter months. Why not just start the bike and let it warm up once every month or so?
    Last edited by Fred; 05-22-2019 at 09:47 AM.
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    Senior Member tylermoney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryL View Post
    Why blame this on the carb? You answered your own question in the very first sentence, Someone left the gas on. It won't matter in the least if you have an old carb, newer one or even a FI Van Van if you insist upon running the same crappy fuel and it goes stale in the tank. Treating the fuel with some one of the stabilizing treatments could help and remembering to turn the petcock off might do some good but that green crud is from the fuel itself and has nothing to do with what type of carb or fuel injection system you have.

    GaryL
    The nice thing about living in Texas is that it's more or less always riding season ... sure sometimes the summer gets so hot that it isn't very fun or comfortable, but it's certainly still decent riding weather—with an oil cooler for the tw of course

    Anywho, since it's always riding year, my bikes have never really sat more than a few days at a time, so I have not had that issue. I do have those issues with my lawn mower sitting through most of the fall/winter, but when I moved to ethenal free gass, I no longer had problems. I think with a mix of remembering to turn off your gas and draining the carb, using fuel treatments and/or maybe even running the engine every so often, you shouldn't have to do too much heavy maintenance I would think.
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  10. #9
    Senior Member RaZed1's Avatar
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    If you have access to start the bike while in storage, add fuel stabilizer and start/warm up the bike at least once a month.

    If you don't, add fuel stabilizer to a brimmed tank, run the bike for at least a few minutes so treated fuel works into the carb. Then shut petcock off and let it run until it runs out of fuel. Open the drain screw to let the last bit out of the bowl.

    If ethanol free fuel is available near you I'd strongly suggest getting some, at least for the "last tank" before storage.

    Yes, fuel injection is more resistant to clogging with the green jelly since it's under 45psi instead of atmospheric, but that doesn't mean it's maintenance free and you can just forget about it. I recently resurrected a long neglected Suzuki C50 (EFI) with a rusty gas tank the former owner attempted to get going again, which resulted in it running like crap and he couldn't figure out why so I bought it for a song. Both injectors were full of a mix of cruddy jelly and rusty mess from the tank. The fuel pump was stuck. Entire fuel system had to be overhauled. De-rust the tank, replace the entire pump assembly, and sonic clean the injectors, which actually them worked perfectly fine again afterward. Cleaning a carb would have been far easier and cheaper.
    Last edited by RaZed1; 05-22-2019 at 10:18 AM.
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  11. #10
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    Go read the articles on E10 fuels and the condition known as Phase Separation. My assessment after much research on this subject is that ethanol laced fuel is stable for just a couple months with around 90 days being the limit. Fuel treatments might help some but they DO NOT remove the ethanol and instead just retard the separation to a degree. Our TWs have a vented fuel system open to the outside atmosphere and moisture from the air can and will intrude the system. My very best advice for storing a gasoline motor of any kind is to find real Non ethanol fuel for the storage period and treat it with something such as Stabil or Sea Foam prior to storing. Run the engine with real treated gas for a few minutes and run the carb dry after shutting the petcock off. At an auto store you can buy fogging spray that you spray into the air box after the filter directly into the carb which keeps the carb lubricated during storage. I bought mine called Storage Seal at a Marine shop and Marinas swear by this method for winter out board motor storage. Most Marinas also carry Non Ethanol fuels.

    GaryL
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    Be Decisive! Right or Wrong just make a decision. ​ The road of life is paved with flat squirrels that couldn't make a decision.

    Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
    If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    1987 Yamaha BW350 Big Wheel
    2017 Snowdog Track sled tow motor for ice fishing
    Kubota BX2370 Subcompact tractor with snow blower
    Wilderness System Ride 115 fishing Kayaks

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