Which lithium battery is the best replacement for the old acid battery?
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Thread: Which lithium battery is the best replacement for the old acid battery?

  1. #1
    Junior Member aussiedog's Avatar
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    Which lithium battery is the best replacement for the old acid battery?

    Battery is dead on my 2009 TW200. I want to replace the battery with a more powerful lithium battery.
    What is the favorite of the forum?
    I used search on this forum and google. Can't find a straight answer. Need to ride.
    Proud owner of:

    1986 Yamaha IT200
    2009 Yamaha TW200

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    Depends on your location (USA, Australia, UK, Timbuktu et al)

    Some members can relate disaster stories for the same brand that others have had success with - and a lot of that is "date related". One generation of a single brand is rarely equal to the next generation, and Lithium batteries are improving and becoming cheaper each year

    All I can suggest, is that you choose a brand that has a high turnover (reduces the risk of “old stock”), and from a company that has a fixed guarantee

    Not perhaps the answer you were looking for, but at the moment Lithium is a crap shoot as to what you will end up with

    I have two new Lithium’s at the moment, but as they’re a recent acquisition, I have no idea of what’s six months down the line …..
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    Senior Member NorthernSpy's Avatar
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    Thank you Purple for the honest answer. I've looked everywhere in Canada, but the economics of purchasing one just doesn't make sense, particularly for something that is either unreliable or short life span. I can't justify spending four to six times the price of a lead acid battery. Just not a big enough market compared to the States. Or maybe something to do with duties.
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  5. #4
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    Although I got over four years on my last lead acids, I figured to move with the times and go for Lithium

    They’re probably 3 or 4 times the cost of lead acid, but the reliability issue is still the same with lead acid – eg a crap shoot

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Yamaha-TW...8AAOSwICxaoSmP

    It’s a “leap of faith” to some degree, but one I was prepared to take for the maintenance issues, the holes in my jeans, the topping up after a fall – the list goes on

    With Lithium (if all goes well), there is none of the above, plus they keep their charge for over a year without the need for “topping up” – lighter, smaller, better cranking power – again, the list goes on

    For me, it was “time” for an upgrade, as a similar “well known Lithium battery supplier” was almost twice that price a year ago

    But as a said earlier, the proof of the pudding is in the eating, and I’ve yet to put this brand through their paces …..
    Last edited by Purple; 06-19-2019 at 08:38 AM.
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  6. #5
    Junior Member aussiedog's Avatar
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    Thanks Purple.
    I am USA, central Alabama.I bought this on amazon...WPS Featherweight Lithium Ion Battery – Fits: Yamaha TW200 1990–2018.
    Sounds like I need to return this and just buy a acid battery.
    Proud owner of:

    1986 Yamaha IT200
    2009 Yamaha TW200

  7. #6
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    Why return it ?

    (Despite the fact that it’s overpriced, and a re-branded product)
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  8. #7
    Junior Member aussiedog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Purple View Post
    Why return it ?

    (Despite the fact that it’s overpriced, and a re-branded product)
    Explain.
    Proud owner of:

    1986 Yamaha IT200
    2009 Yamaha TW200

  9. #8
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    Why would you return a Lithium battery when you have already got it - the return costs would seem to be prohibitive

    Why would you not simply give it a chance

    And in case you mean "an over priced re-branded product" – I doubt very much if “Western Power Sports” manufactures their own batteries, and if you look up Lithium batteries with the same power indicators on the top, you’ll soon find out where they’re getting them from

    The JMT battery I referred to earlier, looks suspiciously like the WPS version, just with a higher price tag - £70 = $88 – yet WPS wants $100 ?

    This is what I meant by “over priced re-branded” – what would concern me more, is that the “red tops” are supposed to be the latest versions …..
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  10. #9
    Junior Member tombohannon's Avatar
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    I am a subscriber to Consumer Motorcycle News... They have done several stories about Lithium batteries... From people who have bought new Lithium batteries and a few days later, would not even turn over their motorcycle engines... (cold battery).... but most people don't understand that Lithium batteries require very special chargers to keep them working... Here is a good article about that problem... https://www.electronics-notes.com/ar...n-charging.php

  11. #10
    Super Moderator Purple's Avatar
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    Thank you Tom – although few of us can de-code “Constant current charge: In the first stage of charging a li-ion battery or cell, the charge current is controlled. Typically this will be between 0.5 and 1.0 C. (NB: for a 2 000 mAh battery the charge rate would be 2 000 mA for a charge rate of C). For consumer based LCO cells and batteries, a charge rate of a maximum of 0.8C is recommended.”

    As a vaper, I have some experience of Lithium batteries. 3.7’s typically top out at 4.2, and need time to soak that across the cells in motorcycle batteries. Higher charge rates are fine for some batteries, but you still need to let that “soak” across the cells. From the link provided, I can only assume (and I use the term lightly), that the correct charge rate for a 2000mA battery would be around - sorry, my brain just fell out ……

    As links go, that has to be about as complicated as Quantum physics, which at least I can get my head around

    This in no way reflects on you personally, and if you can explain the above quoted paragraph I take my hat off to you, but this involves learning a whole new language (for me at least), which basically means some Brainiac has found another way of explain the obvious which is utterly incomprehensible to the “average Joe”

    As I understand things, the vast majority of Lithium motorcycle batteries come with “over charge” protection, and “under charge protection” – the point at which they will no longer accept a charge, or provide a charge. The best way to treat Lithium, is to charge it “gently, or the charge just stacks up on top of the first cell, giving a false reading. The more modern Lithium’s can transfer the charge across all the cells, but not “throughout” each cell, meaning that the charge is still “on top” of the cells, but not to any “depth”

    By lowering the charge rate to around one – maybe one and a half Amps – this gives the batteries time to “soak” up the power to maximum capacity. Even on a “fast charge” which is becoming more promoted these days, the power is still “on top”, which can produce immediate results, but will lack performance in the long run

    This is where a charger designed to recognise a Lithium battery is essential, as most chargers will simply read “needs Amps”, and up the charge rate accordingly, which can be death to a Lithium battery – and if “de-sulphate” mode is enabled, eg “high power”, your Lithium is toast (literally)

    With Lithium, less is more, and you need a charger that can recognise that

    Now, compare that explanation to - “Constant current charge: In the first stage of charging a li-ion battery or cell, the charge current is controlled. Typically this will be between 0.5 and 1.0 C. (NB: for a 2 000 mAh battery the charge rate would be 2 000 mA for a charge rate of C). For consumer based LCO cells and batteries, a charge rate of a maximum of 0.8C is recommended.”

    Again, no personal criticism intended (unless you wrote that article), but given the choice, which explanation makes the most sense ? …..
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