Gas tank rust, who's used what and, what's been the results?
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Thread: Gas tank rust, who's used what and, what's been the results?

  1. #1
    Member FIRE UP's Avatar
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    Gas tank rust, who's used what and, what's been the results?

    Gang,
    Just picked up an '07 that's been sitting for over 5 years. The tank has some substantial rust and, I yanked it off and dumped the fuel in a container. PHEW, that stuff stunk. And, it looked really GREEN, when I did it. Now, I've searched a bit on here in the technical section and can't seem to find any specific articles/write ups on the specifics of handling/removing rust inside these TW tanks. I've cruised Youtube and, there's a few on there. It appears I've got lots of choices as far as chemicals are concerned. I don't mind handling caustic chemicals at all. After 30+ years on an FD, dealing with some chemicals and a rusty fuel tank is well, sort of child's play. But, just WHICH chemicals do any of you use? What kind of time frame from the time you poured them in, to the time you removed them and, how well was the job done? I thank any and all of you in advance that could send some tech tips on this.

    P.S. I don't think the tank is structurally damaged. I'm pretty sure it's just a nice even coat of rust but, no large flaking.
    Scott
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    Ken
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    I used a Kreem tank liner kit. It come with acid to eat the rust out of the tank, you neutralize the rust and remove the remaining acid with water. The acid turns the rust into iron and the water neutralizes it so it can safely be poured out anywhere such as a flower bed. The kit comes with some type of alcohol which removes all remaining water and moisture. Then you Kreem tank line the tank after the preparation. I have had my tank liner in two motorcycle tanks now for over 15 years. I live in Texas so I have had no issues at all. Others say they have had issues. I'm not sure if other climates are less suitable or if the preparation didn't include the complete kit. I bought the Kreem tank liner kit that was for a car gas tank. This included enough of the solutions to do two motorcycle gas tanks.
    1993 TW200 just shy of 46,000 miles

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    Senior Member Sthrnromr's Avatar
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    Naval Jelly and various nuts and bolts, or BBs, or an old chain would work. Shake and Bake! Then you can Kreem it if you want or just use it with a good cheap inline filter. Alternatively a plastic or metal replacement tank.
    Ken and TeeDoubleUTwoHundred like this.
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  5. #4
    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Just buy a new plastic tank. The pain and hassle saved will be well worth the money.
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    Senior Member TW-Brian's Avatar
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    The cheapest and easiest route would be to just buy 4 or 5 of gallons of white vinegar, let it soak for a few days, then rinse and repeat.

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    GOF
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    I've used the vinegar with good results. Patience is key. After the final soak rinse with water. Then if you don't do something to get the water out you'll have the bare metal flash rust. to avoid that you need to get the water out quick. I use some rubbing alcohol to absorb the water. Then dump that out and fill the tank with some fresh, non-ethanol fuel.
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    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    I have twice used POR-15 motorcycle tank repair kit with what I consider excellent results.

    https://www.por15.com/POR-15-Motorcy...it-_p_106.html

    The down side is it is labor intensive, very messy, and a bit on the expensive side.

    My experience: Attach a long stick to the sponge brush and use that to mop up the excess liner from the bottom of the tank. If you get the liner on your hands and then touch the outside of the tank it is difficult to remove -- I think I used Chemtool on a paper towel but do it before it sets otherwise it is on there for good. As I recall, once I started there was no stopping start to finish. Plan accordingly. Remove the fuel valve and block the hole -- I think I used an old fuel valve. The quick and easy way is vinegar. You might try that way first.

    Before and after:

    P2041260.JPGP2191270.JPG
    Ken, littletommy, Peterb and 1 others like this.
    Long live the internal combustion engine!

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    Ken
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    Quote Originally Posted by elime View Post
    I have twice used POR-15 motorcycle tank repair kit with what I consider excellent results.

    https://www.por15.com/POR-15-Motorcy...it-_p_106.html

    The down side is it is labor intensive, very messy, and a bit on the expensive side.

    My experience: Attach a long stick to the sponge brush and use that to mop up the excess liner from the bottom of the tank. If you get the liner on your hands and then touch the outside of the tank it is difficult to remove -- I think I used Chemtool on a paper towel but do it before it sets otherwise it is on there for good. As I recall, once I started there was no stopping start to finish. Plan accordingly. Remove the fuel valve and block the hole -- I think I used an old fuel valve. The quick and easy way is vinegar. You might try that way first.

    Before and after:

    P2041260.JPGP2191270.JPG
    Good details.
    The Kreem tank liner process is about the same. Figure a whole day or more to do this process. One tank I had was so bad it took 3 days of sitting and reapplying the rust kill solution before it was all removed. The replacement tank on that bike was very expensive. The process is a pain on tank liners but you will be rewarded by clean carburetors for nearly as long as you have your bike as long as you use an inline filter. A side note is that with Kreem you can't use anything with Acetone once it is installed. I don't know if anything affects the POR-15 once it is set.
    elime likes this.
    1993 TW200 just shy of 46,000 miles

  10. #9
    Senior Member Badgerflorida's Avatar
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    +1 on white vinegar. Worked for me on my 89 that had a full tank of gas that sat for 5 years. For the final rinse I used a small amount of acetone.
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  11. #10
    Member FIRE UP's Avatar
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    Hey Gang,
    I want to thank all of you that have responded here. I took all of your suggestions into consideration and, also checked out a couple of youtube vids on the subject. Well, I ended up purchasing some "Evapo-rust" from Tractor Supply. It's about $22 a gallon so, I figure'd what the heck, I'll give it the old college try. Well, the tank, as stated had what I thought was minor rust. But, upon getting an inspection camera in there and a long flash light, I was in for some strategic work. I put the whole gallon of that evapo-rust in there and, followed the instructions. I let it sit for four hours. The instructions say 2-4, depending on severity of the rust. Since I was in my little man cave doing other things on the T-dub, I'd shake that tank every now and then to make sure the solution was getting to all parts.
    After about 4 hours, I emptied it. The majority of the innards were pretty clear now. But, down in the crevis's, near the welds, was some pretty tough left over rust. So, I picked away it with some stainless steel, 1/8" welding rod (tough stuff, doesn't bend that easy) and decided that, I'd run the treatment again. Oh, when I thought I was done with the first treatment. I'd emptied about 85% of the solution and, inserted a couple of hand fulls of small, about 1/2" to 3/4" sharp edged ROCKS. I then would vigorously shake that tank in every possible direction 'till I was out of breath. I'd let it sit 'till I recouped and, hit it again. I did that, on and off for about 20 minutes. I then dumped out all the rocks and remaining solution. I got a lot more out of it by doing that. The tank was looking really good but, with the use of that inspection camera, I found out I still needed a bit more soaking. So, back in the solution went. It's gonna remain there over night. We'll see what's what in the morning. In the mean time, time to install my new, wazoo LED turn signals, yahoo!
    Scott
    Retired SDFD, 30 years,
    2004 Itasca Horizon 36GD CAT C-7 330HP
    2008 Honda GL1800 Goldwing Caliente red
    2007 TW 200 "Blue Noid"
    2115 Jeep JKUR Rubicon
    2011 GMC Sierra 1500 Extended Cab 4x4
    HAM, KI6OND
    Me, the wife and our killer Mini Schnauzer, "Sophie"

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