Bent Rear Wheel--What did I do wrong? Best place to get a replacement?
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Thread: Bent Rear Wheel--What did I do wrong? Best place to get a replacement?

  1. #1
    Member Amatduber's Avatar
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    Bent Rear Wheel--What did I do wrong? Best place to get a replacement?

    Brief back story. Acquired the bike, a 2000 with a little over 7,000 miles on it about 15 months ago. With thanks to a couple of members here, I've picked up some replacement parts, and bought others. It's been a slow process, made longer by all the usual stuff that goes with being a working guy with a young family.

    So, this afternoon I finally got some time to work on the bike. I was just hoping to get it running and change the tires so I could haul it across Texas to my parents for the Independence Day weekend, to go exploring dirt roads with my boys, them on their Coleman minibikes. After pulling both the front and rear wheels, I thought I'd take 'em to the local Yamaha shop for the tire swap. I should add hear, I'm pretty sure this bike was wearing the original tires that came with the bike, the Death Wing, etc. When I got to the shop, the said I'd have to leave it and might be able to pick it up on Tuesday. I started to do it, then I thought: heck, man up and tackle it yourself--you'll lean how to do it, have the pride of having done it yourself, and have it done by the end of the day. Well, it didn't work out that way.

    After grabbing a couple of tire irons at Harbor Freight, I went home and started the job. Breaking the bead was tough, but with the help of my stellar 8 year old--my youngest son, but he will work like a man--we finally got it done.

    Then, we hugged hell trying to break the tire over the rim. I initially had it on a Homer bucket, but eventually pulled the spare off the jeep to get better leverage, and man did I get better leverage. Sadly, however, instead of breaking the tire over the rim, I as you can see in the photos, I bent the crap out of the rim.

    I'll confess my ignorance, I've never replaced a tire on a rim, other than on a bicycle and Razor scooter. My entire prep consisted of watching YouTube vids by TDub's Kid and Wranglstar, pretty good vids--and nobody bent a rim.

    So, where did I go wrong? Was it the 20 year old tires? That's my guess. That old tire is stiff, stiff, stiff. Only after I bent the rim it occurred to me I should have cut the old tire off. Other than just taking it to the shop, is there anything else I should have tried?

    Thanks in advance for the education! Also, where is the best place to pickup a new rear wheel?

    TW tire & rim 1.jpgTW tire & rim 2.jpgTW tire & rim 3.jpg
    Last edited by Amatduber; 06-30-2019 at 07:48 AM. Reason: clean-up
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Darth's Avatar
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    Who's that good looking young "wrench" ?
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    and wad up my bike somethin' awful...
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    Super Moderator littletommy's Avatar
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    Given the right hammers and a little heat, I think you can hammer that out.
    Last edited by littletommy; 06-29-2019 at 09:12 PM.
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    John 3:16
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    Senior Member Darth's Avatar
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    More heat!
    Bigger hammer!
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    "Faster, faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death."
    - Hunter S. Thompson

    “It’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than a fast bike slow”.

    "The less horsepower a motorcycle has, the more it can teach you.” - Ben Bostrom

    And though a mountain may rise up and smack the livin' shit outta me,
    and wad up my bike somethin' awful...
    Still, I rise!
    (With apologies to Maya Angelou)


    "Give a Damn"
    - C. M. Howe, Jr.

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  6. #5
    Ken
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amatduber View Post
    Brief back story. Acquired the bike, a 2000 with a little over 7,000 miles on it about 15 months ago. With tanks to a couple of members here, I've picked up some replacement parts, and bought others. It's been a slow process, made longer by all the usual stuff that goes with being a working guy with a young family.

    So, this afternoon I finally got some time to work on the bike. I was just hoping to get it running and change the tires so I could haul it across Texas to my parents for the Independence Day weekend, so I could go exploring dirt roads with my boys, with them on their Coleman minibikes. After pulling both the front and rear wheels, I thought I'd take 'em to the local Yamaha shop for the tire swap. I should add hear, I'm pretty sure this bike was wearing the original tires that came with the bike, the Death Wing, etc. When I got to the shop, the said I'd have to leave it and might be able to pick it up on Tuesday. I started to do it, then I thought: heck, man up and tackle it yourself--you'll lean how to do it, have the pride of having done it yourself, and have it done by the end of the day. Well, it didn't work out that way.

    After grabbing a couple of tire irons at Harbor Freight, I went home and started the job. Breaking the bead was tough, but with the help of my stellar 8 year old--my youngest son, but he will work like a man--we finally got it done.

    Then, we hugged hell trying to break the tire over the rim. I initially had it on a Homer bucket, but eventually pulled the spare off the jeep to get better leverage, and man did I get better leverage. Sadly, however, instead of breaking the tire over the rim, I as you can see in the photos, I bent the crap out of the rim.

    I'll confess my ignorance, I've never replaced a tire on a rim, other than on a bicycle and Razor scooter. My entire prep consisted of watching YouTube vids by TDub's Kid and Wranglstar, pretty good vids--and nobody bent a rim.

    So, where did I go wrong? Was it the 20 year old tires? That's my guess. That old tire is stiff, stiff, stiff. Only after I bent the rim it occurred to me I should have cut the old tire off. Other than just taking it to the shop, is there anything else I should have tried?

    Thanks in advance for the education! Also, where is the best place to pickup a new rear wheel?

    TW tire & rim 1.jpgTW tire & rim 2.jpgTW tire & rim 3.jpg
    What did you do wrong? You must have the strength of a gorilla. First you have to break the bead. Once the bead is broke you push the tire to the center over the ridge on the edge towards the inside of the rim, this allows the extra space needed to get the tire over the edge of the rim with your tire tool. Did you let the air out of the tire first? Looking at your pic it still looks aired up.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member grewen's Avatar
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    Holy Crap.....i wouldn't want to come up against you 2 in a dark lane
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    Greg

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  8. #7
    Super Moderator littletommy's Avatar
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    Stop feeding your son so much spinach.

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    1st John 1:9
    If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

    John 3:16
    For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

    John 3:17
    For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.

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  9. #8
    Senior Member Gastone165's Avatar
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    I agree with LT. With some heat and the proper tools you should be able to get the rim pretty close to normal. I had a good sized dent in the rim on a used TW I picked up and I found the steel is fairly soft and I was able to straighten it to where it was almost unnoticeable. Granted... it wasn’t as large a dent as yours. I’d call yours more of a “flap” then a dent.
    The tires are so big and cushy on these things, if it isn’t perfect you won’t really notice it while riding. If you take it to a shop to straighten it, depending on where you take it, you may come close to the cost of a new rim which costs $189 on Partzilla.
    Ken is correct, you have to get the tire on the opposite side of where you’re using the tire irons down into the grove where the spokes attach. This allows some slack to get the other side of the tire over the rim.
    Hammers, heat, and some wood blocks. You can do it!
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  10. #9
    GOF
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    Looks like you didn't push the tire down into the well of the rim. I've straightened rims with a large adjustable wrench. Even used a pipe on the handle to get leverage. Trick is to go slow and work it a bit at a time. moving and readjusting the wrench as you go.
    Ebay usually has wheels available. But then you gotta wait.
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  11. #10
    Senior Member stagewex's Avatar
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    Double Holy Crap. Were those car/truck tire irons long enough for you? As you can see every inch artificially increases your inner strength, Ha.

    I will usually break the bead on a long-term tire with a rubber mallet all-around & both sides to make sure nothing is sticking or stuck. Then crush (it's an old tire anyway) one side of the tire with a carpenters clamp pushing it into the center of the rim so I can start spooning thenoppgsite side out and around. I've never changed a tire on a TW but if you are familiar with the brand Heidenau they have a model called the K37. They are set-up for sidecar duty and the sidewalls are so hard you'd think they were made of steel. Similar to your situation I went too far and cut into the sidewall exposing, yeah, steel. That was a very expensive education. I now use liquid wax as a lubricate (Hondaline) instead of soap, powder for the tube and a set of real motorcycle spoons that are a bit bigger than my hand. As well as the clamp and hammer. Lesson learned. Your tires which you suspect at being original and thus almost 20 years old must have had the consistency of a piece of hardwood and won out over the mild steel of the rim. Worse things could have happened like you riding on them and they shattered like glass rather then just lose air. Good to be proactive about what you ride on and what stops you (brakes).

    You can fix that but if you are going to do extended highway riding at top speeds I'd find another, perhaps a used one. For local and dirt riding it looks like it'll be okay.
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