Swapping in the Banshee Rear Shock
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Thread: Swapping in the Banshee Rear Shock

  1. #1
    Senior Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Swapping in the Banshee Rear Shock

    Back in the garage to do some work this weekend.

    Pulled the rear shock, using the repair manual I found that removing the slip on portion of the exhaust to be way easier than removing the rear wheel for work on this.

    5C129791-17B4-40CD-A1E1-CF0923D6CA73_1566831542990.jpeg

    As stated in other posts, due to the location of the carb boot and even if you attempt to move the turn signal relay out of the way, there is just not enough room for the banshee shock rebound adjuster and reservoir to be oriented toward the top of the bike.
    F9C9E770-50E0-4EA9-A235-339F4EDD48FB_1566831176531.jpeg
    4A664D26-9E21-47FC-B5A5-F29AD37EE7BF_1566831201883.jpeg

    I oriented the shock as recommended by others, inverted, with the reservoir oriented towards the front of the bike, plenty of clearance for the shock adjustment points in this configuration.

    Also, as mentioned before... the eyes where the top and bottom bolts hold the shock in position are much thinner than the OEM shock, I did not have the 7/16 ID washers to shore up the extra side space on the bolt (will need to do this for top and bottom), ordered some heavy duty washers and should be here tommorow-ish. The picture below shows the space left on the upper bolt after mock-up that needs to be spaced with washers.
    9FF4FC72-4ED8-4A11-94C7-878591A640BC_1566831466342.jpeg

    Once the washers come in, I’ll take a few more pictures of the actual install so others interested have some kind of reference.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Hope you put a stiffer spring in and limit shock travel to keep rear tire out of upper frame cross member when approaching full compression should you plan to go off-roading at all. With a stock tire and stock length swing arm I believe shock travel needs to be limited to about 2 & 3/16ths of an inch...look at the OEM shock to validate as my memory is imperfect. That crossmember can be modified and the seat raised for more clearance if you desire maximum possible suspension travel.
    Last edited by Fred; 08-26-2019 at 12:09 PM.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    Hope you put a stiffer spring in and limit shock travel to keep rear tire out of upper frame cross member when approaching full compression should you plan to go off-roading at all. With a stock tire and stock length swing arm I believe shock travel needs to be limited to about 2 & 3/16ths of an inch...look at the OEM shock to validate as my memory is imperfect. That crossmember can be modified and the seat raised for more clearance if you desire maximum possible suspension travel.
    That’s an excellent point, Fred.

    I did end up ordering a new spring... the beefiest one I could find for the stock shock setup (see below).

    http://www.cascadeinnovations.net/st...re_dept_id=188

    Could the travel limit be addressed with a spacer?

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    I've just chased the build stories & recommendations of others from the past when attempting to replicate the Mr.Gizmo's suspension. It is all gathering dust in the garage for the moment but I installed a Raptor spring on a Banshee shock body which was once a recommended option.
    Suppose one could compress suspension using ratchet straps to the point of tire contact with TW, then measure what makes a logical maximum shock travel. Factor in a bit for bump stop compression.
    Up front 36mm TTR forks generously donated by CJ7Pilot should hopefully give me the same or better happiness as the 35mm Tri-Z forks on Mr.Gizmo.
    Since Mr.Gizmo's Banshee shock has survived a decade or so with a travel limiting bump stop made from a urethane bumper I did the same. Trim to length, then slice bumper longitudinally enough to slip over shock's shaft. Bonded the cut and reinforced with zip tie . Inelegant but a proven solution not requiring shock body disassembly.
    Darth likes this.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
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  6. #5
    Senior Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    I've just chased the build stories & recommendations of others from the past when attempting to replicate the Mr.Gizmo's suspension. It is all gathering dust in the garage for the moment but I installed a Raptor spring on a Banshee shock body which was once a recommended option.
    Suppose one could compress suspension using ratchet straps to the point of tire contact with TW, then measure what makes a logical maximum shock travel. Factor in a bit for bump stop compression.
    Up front 36mm TTR forks generously donated by CJ7Pilot should hopefully give me the same or better happiness as the 35mm Tri-Z forks on Mr.Gizmo.
    Since Mr.Gizmo's Banshee shock has survived a decade or so with a travel limiting bump stop made from a urethane bumper I did the same. Trim to length, then slice bumper longitudinally enough to slip over shock's shaft. Bonded the cut and reinforced with zip tie . Inelegant but a proven solution not requiring shock body disassembly.
    Same here, since I joined the forums I’ve been reading the multiple different posts about rear shock swaps. One thing that’s always been missing (by the time I started reading it) were some pictures for reference or what things are supposed to look like during and after.

    Hopefully this will provide some additional reference and ideas if other wish to change their rear shock or explore other rear suspension mods.

    I found a spacer (no actual dimensions but appears to be about 2”) for a few bucks on eBay for the banshee shock. That, plus the bump stop should shore up any over-travel into the crossmember.

    Did you bore out your triple trees to accept the TTR forks?
    cateyetech likes this.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWBigBlake View Post
    Did you bore out your triple trees to accept the TTR forks?
    I did. Worked out great...Need to do a fork rebuild, wait for speedo cable to arrive and replace a needle bearing on an r6 monoshock and I'll be ready to put them on. Oh yeah...and find a taller kick stand.

    If you were raising the TW then you could add a short extender to the banshee and then you'd get full travel of the mono shock without the tire hitting under the seat.
    Last edited by Trail Woman; 08-26-2019 at 04:40 PM.
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  8. #7
    Senior Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Woman View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TWBigBlake View Post
    Did you bore out your triple trees to accept the TTR forks?
    I did. Worked out great...Need to do a fork rebuild, wait for speedo cable to arrive and replace a needle bearing on an r6 monoshock and I'll be ready to put them on. Oh yeah...and find a taller kick stand.

    If you were raising the TW then you could add a short extender to the banshee and then you'd get full travel of the mono shock without the tire hitting under the seat.
    That is good to know, and if I decide to swap front forks, I’ll probably mount an extender. For now I’ll probably just roll with the spacer I picked up.

    That r6 is gonna drop the ride height a bit isn’t it? No criticism, just curious.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Trail Woman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWBigBlake View Post
    That is good to know, and if I decide to swap front forks, I’ll probably mount an extender. For now I’ll probably just roll with the spacer I picked up.

    That r6 is gonna drop the ride height a bit isn’t it? No criticism, just curious.
    Yes the overall length is shorter but it has longer travel the TW monoshock as well as dampening and rebound adjustment. I'm going to make an extending adapter for it. The ride height after sag should end up 2-3" taller then stock if all goes well. I'm prepared to try other monoshock options but the r6 was really cheap and has a lot of adjustment so I thought I'd give a try. I was considering the banshee at first but the specs are all over the place and I didn't know which one to get.
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  10. #9
    Senior Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    Got the heavy duty 7/16 washers in today so I can finish the install of the banshee shock (as-is).

    New coil from Cascade Innovations (Damascus, OR) showed up yesterday, just waiting on the shock spacer to prevent cross-member contact... which I’m pretty sure I’d need to be carrying a fully grown Yak as the rear passenger to get the spring to compress that much, but we shall see.

    F09C95CF-930E-4AC9-B630-D660B1ADA33C_1567091852210.jpeg

  11. #10
    Senior Member TWBigBlake's Avatar
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    this post should be titled “THIS IS NOT A BOLT-ON AND GO SWAP”

    Ran into another snag, perhaps a change on the newer TWs, the swing arm bracket that connects to the shock has a lovely lip that does not agree with the contour of the reservoir-side of the shock (see pictures).

    Not a huge deal but if the bike ever came off the ground or hit big enough divots at speed, the swing arm rotating downward to its limit would leave 3-6” (I haven’t measured) of unused travel and leaving all that weight/rebound on the shock body.

    My next step once I get some cutting wheels in tomorrow is to fire up the Dremmel and take off about 1/4 inch of material from the bracket at a slope, hopefully leaving plenty of material to continue to support the shock.

    I may just cut the rest of the front plate out later and re-weld a whole new/shorter plate in its place... why the heck did they put a hole in it???

    2F6F78EF-D599-4F0D-A2C5-82B3920E8C66_1567106597365.jpeg

    3DF7F653-72D8-4013-8BF3-8C78BE6E9E3E_1567106588783.jpeg

    In the pictures, the bottom of the shock isn’t bolted in, because of the lip on the shock housing, the eye of the shock won’t line up with the bracket holes.
    Trail Woman and Fred like this.

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