Bought a used TW in great condition.... destroyed engine within 10 minutes . Help! - Page 5
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Thread: Bought a used TW in great condition.... destroyed engine within 10 minutes . Help!

  1. #41
    Senior Member SHAG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tombauer View Post
    And I suppose you are a master mechanic with 50+ years experience?
    Not quite 50 years but pretty close. How did you know?
    Fred likes this.
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  2. #42
    Senior Member sibyrnes's Avatar
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    Funny, the only time I drowned my TW was in the Desert! Crossed a steam of unknown depth(I know) and got up to the tank in water. After dragging the bike to dry land and sitting in the Utah sun for 15 minutes, it started right up and we continued on our way. After 5000 miles the bike just keeps getting better!

    As I side note, when a lot younger and crazier, my friend rode his TS 185 into a lake. We pulled it out and removed the head of that little two stroke with the bike's tool kit, pumped the water out of it, reassembled and rode off. He swears the bike ran better after that!

    Not sure if I have a point to make with these stories but drowning an engine is not necessarily a death sentance.
    Last edited by sibyrnes; 11-08-2019 at 07:00 AM.
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  3. #43
    Senior Member GaryL's Avatar
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    The air intake on a TW is under the seat behind the battery. If you have the carb lines set right with the overflow tube Y connected and up under the tank the bike should be able to cross short streams going slow just about up to the tank. This of course depends upon if your air filter cover is sealed properly. I would not recommend jerking around in deep crossings for very long and I also don't recommend dunking a very hot engine quickly into cold water. I would have more concern over electrical connectors shorting out as long as the engine, carb and air systems are all properly functioning. Those who have owned and towed boats any long distances for fishing trips should be well aware to allow the wheel bearings to cool prior to submerging them. If they go under while warm or hot they tend to suck water in, hence the use of spring loaded Bearing Buddies on boat trailers.

    GaryL
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  5. #44
    Senior Member MtnMan75's Avatar
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    Best thing to do after dunking one is pull the plug and crank it over a bit, and pull the side cover on the air filter and tilt it left or pop the little drain under the airbox. Only takes a moment doing it this way and you won't run the risk of a hydrolock. Even if you sat in the sun for a long time, if by chance the point the engine died was right at the end of the intake stroke and the cylinder is full of water, the damage occurs as soon as you turn the key or kick it over right at the beginning of the compression stroke, so removing the plug just lets it come out the spark plug hole and avoids disaster. The remaining little amounts of water in the system for a short duration doesn't hurt anything, but you can't compress liquid which is what causes all that destruction in the top end and possibly to the main bearing/connecting rod.
    Last edited by MtnMan75; 11-08-2019 at 08:11 AM.
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  6. #45
    Member Wickedcoolname's Avatar
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    The first thing you did when you bought a used bike was change the tires. Good idea, but you should have changed the old too. Its the first thing I do when I buy anything with an engine. I don't care if it came from a dealer with paperwork showing a recent oil change, I still change it.
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  7. #46
    Senior Member RockyTFS's Avatar
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    That might not have achieved anything if the owner had just changed it and cleaned out all the rust particles in the filter. The only engine I ever saw with that much rust in the bottom end came out of the ocean where it had sat for 6 months.
    Last edited by RockyTFS; 11-08-2019 at 05:11 PM.
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  8. #47
    Senior Member Xracer's Avatar
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    Cool

    I was going to stay out of this but after another look at the pictures I'm sure by now the bearing races have pitted. No amount of flushing is going to solve that. It's time for a complete rebuild or as others have said replacement and yes I've been in the motorcycle biz. for a very long time.
    Last edited by Xracer; 11-08-2019 at 02:13 PM.
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  9. #48
    Senior Member RockyTFS's Avatar
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    Agreed....Definitely toast.
    Original owner: : OP
    Rocky
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  10. #49
    Ken
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    Senior Member Ken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtnMan75 View Post
    Best thing to do after dunking one is pull the plug and crank it over a bit, and pull the side cover on the air filter and tilt it left or pop the little drain under the airbox. Only takes a moment doing it this way and you won't run the risk of a hydrolock. Even if you sat in the sun for a long time, if by chance the point the engine died was right at the end of the intake stroke and the cylinder is full of water, the damage occurs as soon as you turn the key or kick it over right at the beginning of the compression stroke, so removing the plug just lets it come out the spark plug hole and avoids disaster. The remaining little amounts of water in the system for a short duration doesn't hurt anything, but you can't compress liquid which is what causes all that destruction in the top end and possibly to the main bearing/connecting rod.
    This reminds me of a hydrolock I had on an old Honda I had. I tried to turn the engine over slowly with the kickstarter and it wouldn't move. I pulled out the plugs, squirted wd-40 down the sparkplug holes thinking the rings were rusted. The next day I kicked it and a big blob of oil shot all the way across the garage and SPLATTTTTTT all over my wall. Anyway, after that I had it running really quick.
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  11. #50
    Senior Member TW_in_BC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wickedcoolname View Post
    The first thing you did when you bought a used bike was change the tires. Good idea, but you should have changed the old too. Its the first thing I do when I buy anything with an engine. I don't care if it came from a dealer with paperwork showing a recent oil change, I still change it.
    Yup...it's the FIRST thing I do when I get a new (to me) bike (or any vehicle) home...out with the old and in with the new. That way you have a new baseline to work from.
    Whenever I buy a truck or car, it gets an oil and filter change...new air and fuel filters...then a trip to the Transmission shop for new fluid. If there is documentation to show work done recently, I may forgo some of this but definitely new engine oil.
    2008 TW200
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