T-DUB Reccomended Oil, and Octane Rating?
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  1. #1
    Senior Member Swamp's Avatar
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    On my '06 TW, there is a sticker on the inside of the left panel, that gives the recommended oil and fuel octane for the bike.



    This is calling for the use of 10W-30, or in hotter climates, 20W-40



    It also calls for the minimum fuel Octane of 91



    Are you guys using Premium fuel in the T-DUB'S?



    Just curious!
    Swamp

    2006 TW200

  2. #2
    Senior Member Stromper's Avatar
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    Because it is air cooled and I do stop n go in the woods I use real Redline true synthetic 10-40 and perhaps even notchier shifting



    No benefit detected



    Any GAs

  3. #3
    Senior Member mtkd's Avatar
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    I run minimum octane. Haven't noticed any problems.



    I run 20w 50, ran it in the cold in New York and I probably should have. In Arizona now and I really don't even see a difference.
    -Szj



    2001 TW

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Leisure Time Larry's Avatar
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    Whoa! Shhhh, you could practically start a war with that headline around here. Most will say they've run all of the above without issues. 87 octane and a 10w-40 motorcycle oil for wet clutches is a minimum. I say, since the TW uses so little of each, bump it to ethanol free 89 octane and a synthetic like Mobil 1 10w-40 Motorcycle Racing 4T oil if you can. It'll run better and shift smoother. For more info do some searches and read through the previous battle logs. Or, just go ride!
    - Leisure Time Larry -
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  6. #5
    Member bruisr's Avatar
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    91 Octane and Yamaha Lube synthetic 20-50W in Southern Nevada area
    1993 TW/1200 origional miles/FMF/Clarke Tank/Pro Bend Hand Guards/Pro Taper chain/Larger Foot Pegs/Pro Taper grips/PIAA 35w/Cyclorack/LED stock turn signal conversion/Storage tubes/Kenda 270 5.10 front tire/Glock 45 Handle Bar mount(for the desert runs)!

  7. #6
    Senior Member mrlmd's Avatar
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    For the umpteenth time -- The TW200 uses regular gas, it is a low compression engine and anything with higher octane is a waste of money. Premium gas is meant for high compression engines and contains inhibitor-type additives to prevent preignition. Premium fuel actually burns slower and has less "power" than regular gas and will adversely affect the TW's performance and fuel mileage. The mistaken assumption that premium fuel is "better" is wrong and it is not meant for these engines. All you are doing is wasting your money. If you use the bike a lot, regular gas bought anywhere is fine, if you use it less, then ethanol-free fuel is a little better and that actually has more energy in it than E-10 anyway. If you can find ethanol-free reglular gas, get it, otherwise any regular gas is fine. If you don't ride the bike much, put in 1 oz of Berryman's B-12 Chemtool (about $3 a can, sold in Walmart, Autozone, etc) per gal of gas, or Seafoam, same dose ($10 a can). This will keep your carb clean and prevent it from gumming up. Add 1 oz/gal every 3 or 4 tank fillups and you and the TW will be happy.

    In most places in the US, regular gas is 87 octane, but some locales and countries calculate it differently and 91 octane is actually regular fuel. Just buy the cheapest gas at the pump, which is regular. And this is a second and third world bike, it runs on just about anything.



    Without starting a war about what is the best oil to use, just make sure it is motorcycle-specific oil, not automotive oil, ie, there are no "friction modifiers" in it, and it does not say "energy conserving" on the label. These will not work well in a wet clutch motorcycle, the clutch will slip.

  8. #7
    Senior Member n2o2diver's Avatar
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    mrlmd,



    Sorry I gave you a red -1



    I was using my I pad and while scrolling I touched it. I've done it before and probably will again.



    I certainly didn't mean to and can't seem to undo it.



    Somebody give this a few thumbs up. mrlmd gave some great advice.
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  9. #8
    Senior Member niqhowie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrlmd View Post
    For the umpteenth time -- The TW200 uses regular gas, it is a low compression engine and anything with higher octane is a waste of money. Premium gas is meant for high compression engines and contains inhibitor-type additives to prevent preignition. Premium fuel actually burns slower and has less "power" than regular gas and will adversely affect the TW's performance and fuel mileage. The mistaken assumption that premium fuel is "better" is wrong and it is not meant for these engines. All you are doing is wasting your money. If you use the bike a lot, regular gas bought anywhere is fine, if you use it less, then ethanol-free fuel is a little better and that actually has more energy in it than E-10 anyway. If you can find ethanol-free reglular gas, get it, otherwise any regular gas is fine. If you don't ride the bike much, put in 1 oz of Berryman's B-12 Chemtool (about $3 a can, sold in Walmart, Autozone, etc) per gal of gas, or Seafoam, same dose ($10 a can). This will keep your carb clean and prevent it from gumming up. Add 1 oz/gal every 3 or 4 tank fillups and you and the TW will be happy.

    In most places in the US, regular gas is 87 octane, but some locales and countries calculate it differently and 91 octane is actually regular fuel. Just buy the cheapest gas at the pump, which is regular. And this is a second and third world bike, it runs on just about anything.



    Without starting a war about what is the best oil to use, just make sure it is motorcycle-specific oil, not automotive oil, ie, there are no "friction modifiers" in it, and it does not say "energy conserving" on the label. These will not work well in a wet clutch motorcycle, the clutch will slip.




    I can see how this makes sense from your explanation as my chevelle runs better on non premium/ non ethanol dilluted gas. But, why would Yamaha engineers put that Premium is needed on their bikes?
    "Peace be the journey"

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  10. #9
    Senior Member Swamp's Avatar
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    I not trying to start anything, but it is printed right on my 2006 to use 91 octane fuel!



    Just sayin!
    Swamp

    2006 TW200

  11. #10
    Senior Member rm_hm's Avatar
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    My 2009 manual says









    This is the important part



    [R+M/2] of 86 or higher OR a research octane number of 91 or higher.



    The important bit to know is that 87 with the R+M/2 method (Mon) in the United States is equal to 91 in countries using the Research Octane Number (RON) method.





    (R + M) / 2 is nothing more than an average of 2 methods of measuring octane rating.



    R represents the Research Octane Number (RON) method. RON is calculated by running fuel in a variable compression test engine and comparing the results with pure octane/heptane mixtures.



    M represents the Motor Octane Number (MON) method. MON is calculated by running a preheated fuel mixture under load in a variable compression engine at higher RPMs than used in the RON method.




    The MON method is regarded as being a more accurate measurement and will return lower octane ratings then the RON method.



    The rating you see on pumps in the U.S. is an average of these two methods and is represented by the formula (R + M) / 2; it is also commonly referred to as the “Anti-Knock Index” (AKI).














    United States fuel labels



















    FOREIGN FUEL LABEL (RON METHOD)















    Link to the last dozen or so octane threads in here https://www.google.c...iw=1680&bih=941



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