All Balls Steering Bearings Question
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Thread: All Balls Steering Bearings Question

  1. #1
    Senior Member old white truck's Avatar
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    I am going to order the All Balls steering bearings. Is there anything else I need to replace while I am doing this? While I have the bike apart I want to replace anything that is questionable in the area. I would rather spend a few extra bucks on replacing parts so I don't have to take things apart later. The front wheel came to an abrupt stop against an immoveable object and I want to change whatever might be needed.



    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Senior Member silverhead's Avatar
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    Change your front fork oil since they'll be off of the bike. Only if it needs it I guess



    Did you bend your forks at all in the abrupt stop? I doubt you bent your wheel given the amount of tire between the wheel and immovable objects



    In my case if we're needing to replace anything questionable, we'd be replacing the rider....
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    1993 TW200

  3. #3
    Senior Member old white truck's Avatar
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    Yep - I will be replacing my fork oil. And, as a matter of fact, thanks to help from a couple of other forum members I will actually have new forks.



    I was more concerned about bearing related components around the stem. There are an awful lot of parts, and I am sure not all of these come in the All Balls kit:




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  5. #4
    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    Funny, I just did the fork stem bearings on my parts bike today and it is fairly easy. It is everything else that is the pain. I ended up hanging my handlebars from the ceiling leaving all the cables and wires attached. And I hung the dash and ignition switch and head light from the handlebars. It just seemed easier to me than having first take it all apart then put it back together and adjust it all. If you look close you can see the vertical support wires going up. I used straightened coat hangers.







    The All Balls Bearings are tapered cones and the rollers are trapped in a cage, like a wheel bearing. I wasn't sure how to install the seal they sent but figured out that one side of the seal snaps onto the large end of the cone. I am sorry I didn't take more pictures. There is also a Yamaha seal under the bottom bearing. I noticed using only the All Balls seal there was still plenty of room for the Yamaha seal too so I left it in place. If you use a new Yamaha seal it may be to tight a fit. And be careful you don't wreck the bottom seal while removing the lower race in case you decide to use it with the All Balls seal.







    Setting the load on the bearing I basically tightened the star or slotted nut until all the play was gone and then a teeny bit tighter. When you tighten the chrome bolt that is right in the middle on top it tightens the entire set up and you will notice it is a little harder to turn the triple tree back and forth. I am not sure how much it matters.



    Darrell wants the NorCal group to take notice of the divots in the lower race so they may understand his "comments" on the notchy steering were justified.
    Long live the internal combustion engine!

  6. #5
    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    And what you have numbered 1 through 5 plus the unnumbered thing below number 2 will be tossed. Number 35 MAY be that seal I was talking about.



    Long live the internal combustion engine!

  7. #6
    Senior Member Rainman's Avatar
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    The parts microfiche seems a bit overwhelming, trust me, I've been there. I was hesitant to do mine because the task tooked daunting. There really aren't that many pieces. I mean, there is, but when you get it apart you'll see. Don't be scared when roller bearings bounce across the floor because you won't need them anymore. Make sure you pack the new bearings full of grease and grease the stem as well. Putting the stem in the freezer while you pack the new bearings helped me. It allowed the new bearings to slide down the stem a lot easier.



    If you get stuck, ask for help. I have a parts bike outside that I could take some video for you to show you how to do it if you need it.



    The hardest part, seriously, was building up the courage to do it. Once I started, it didn't seem like such a huge task.



    I used a crow bar to remove my lower stem and it seemed like over kill, but it worked. Light taps with the hammer and the lower race started to move. Don't think you have to pull the lower race up, you just need to move it up. All you need is a wedge and once the race starts to move upwards, the stem tapers down so it comes off.
    If you can't find it, grind it

    1990 TW200

  8. #7
    Senior Member silverhead's Avatar
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    The three most technical aspects (and places you could 'break stuff') are removing the ball race from the steering stem, seating the new races into place in the frame, and getting the new taper bearing smacked down onto the steering stem.





    Tips: Use a cold chisel and a light hammer to tap the ball race loose. Chisel at it from underneath and work your way around slowly. You don't want to gaul this bearing surface. It'll pop loose slowly.. You only need to move it upward about 1/8" before it pops loose.







    This is a photo with my new bearing in place. I used my plastic shop-vac attachment tube as a 'drift' with a rubber mallet to drive this bearing on. Just make sure you do it square. If it starts crooked, pull it off and start again. Don't mangle the stem or you may need a new one. That's why I used plastic and rubber to do this rather than a piece of metal pipe and a sledge hammer. Then I packed it with grease after it was on here. NOTE: It's installed all the way in this photo. It doesn't go down any lower. The seal will be 'loose' and able to turn round and round at this point.









    The top bearing race sticks out this much from the frame. This one requires careful placement and seating it squarely as well. Again.. If it starts crooked, pull it out and go again. I used a big 3/4" drive socket of the same size as a drift. Car parts stores sell bearing drift tools (and rent them out for free sometimes.)

    The drift tools are the RIGHT tool. I've just done this enough that I can get away with my method.





    The lower bearing race on my bike went in by hand! This is not ideal and I'll be keeping an eye on it in terms of coming loose.









    Otherwise, the procedure just requires laying the parts out in the order you took them off so you don't forget. I've put All Balls into four bikes now. Each bike was less than ideal. They're doing us a service by supplying metric taper bearings, but they are just generic. Always remember that. They were not designed or approved by Yamaha. So fitment is not as good as factory parts. They work great when you get them installed though.



    This is how much stuff you end up removing just to do the job. So having a good motorcycle jack or other stable setup is mandatory.









    I also used the opportunity to resurface my front brake drum by using sand paper and brake cleaner. I also oiled my speedometer cable.







    And just be happy that the TW bearing kit fits! Most AllBalls kits are made for bikes that had varying sizes over the years so they have a hard time accurately meeting our needs. Nothing is more disappointing than taking apart your whole front end only to find their kit doesn't fit. That happened to me with my XS650, a CB350, and a TS250. I had to contact them with measurements and they sent me a new bearing of the right size.
    MTLHead and Smitty Blackstone like this.
    1993 TW200

  9. #8
    Senior Member Rainman's Avatar
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    This a great thread with lots of useful and correct information. Thanks to all who have shared.
    Smitty Blackstone likes this.
    If you can't find it, grind it

    1990 TW200

  10. #9
    Senior Member elime's Avatar
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    Silverhead -- I borrowed your picture -- I hope you don't mind but I don't have one of my own.



    If you put the seal on one way you get it as pictured, with the bearing resting on top of the seal. If you flip the seal over there is a lip that just fits over the cone, or cage, that holds the rollers. I tired to show with the little white arrows what I mean. I think the outer race, when all is assembled, rubs on the seal. I don't know which way is correct but I placed the cage inside the seal. When you do this there is adequate room left to leave the Yamaha seal in place too, which holds the All Balls seal up and in place. It seems to me that this a better way and makes a better seal but I am not sure.







    My two cents worth!
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  11. #10
    Senior Member old white truck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony View Post
    I ended up hanging my handlebars from the ceiling leaving all the cables and wires attached. And I hung the dash and ignition switch and head light from the handlebars. It just seemed easier to me than having first take it all apart then put it back together and adjust it all. If you look close you can see the vertical support wires going up. I used straightened coat hangers.
    Tony, Thank you for that great idea! Based on your suggestion I used 3 pairs of cords - one for the handlebars, one for the headlight/instrument assembly and one for the top triple clamp. It was very quick and there were no wires or cables to disconnect. With all the strings attached, my TW now looks like a puppet .





    Quote Originally Posted by silverhead View Post
    Car parts stores sell bearing drift tools (and rent them out for free sometimes.)

    The drift tools are the RIGHT tool. I've just done this enough that I can get away with my method.
    I am going to go look for one. Should the the end of the drift tool be tapered?







    Oh, and does anyone have a recommendation on what type of grease to use (or not use)?





    Thanks guys

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