Riding Regulations in your state/province
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Thread: Riding Regulations in your state/province

  1. #1
    Senior Member ejfranz's Avatar
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    Exclamation Riding Regulations in your state/province

    I met an adventurer rider at the Flying Monkey Rally and he had a 1/2 dozen OHV permits on his bike.
    Could we start a list of requirements for each state / province to ride off road there?

    I am planning to go down to Arizona in January and was looking at their rules. After a fair bit of reading it appears that non residents do not require a permit if they are not in Arizona for more than 30 days and it is a street licensed motorcycle that is licensed in your home state/province or if it is not street legal you have an OHV permit from your home state/province otherwise you need to purchase their OHV sticker. Those of you from Arizona can expand or correct this info?

    In BC you are fine to ride street legal motorcycle off road and non street legal vehicles on FSRs if you have a minimum of $300,000 3rd party liability insurance. For those of us in BC who do ride single track, I would strongly suggest you purchase a trail pass either from BCORMA or your local motorcycle club. I support DualSportBC as they are working to keep trails open in BC on our behalf.

    In Oregon if you are going to travel the dunes you need their OHV card (FREE) which you can get online after taking a test and you purchase a OHV sticker (~$10 for 2 years) for the vehicle you plan to use on the dunes and a flag. The TW meets all the other requirements. For those of you in Oregon is this also required for other OHV trails?

    As I do not plan to be riding in California in the summer, I believe I am good to go. I see that there are areas that are closed from June 30 to Sept 1. Anyone care to explain what is needed in this state.
    littletommy, Ken and Elvesus like this.
    2001 TW200 sporting a MT43 up front. Duro has gone to a good home. 2015 VStrom XT, 1996 DT 200, Broken 2010 Xingue 400 XY. 2009 WR250r now shared with my son.

  2. #2
    Senior Member GCFishguy's Avatar
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    Here in NB you just need your license, insurance, and the bike to be plated for road use. Those looking to get their motorcycle license need to take the equivalent of the MSF course ($400), then do at written test at the motor vehicle office. You then get a graduated license; essentially the same as a kid getting his learners permit..can't ride after sunset, can't carry a passenger, zero blood alcohol on the bike, and can't pull a trailer. After a year with the graduated license, you go and do your road test with the driver examiners following you and telling you what to do via 1-way radio. After passing that you have your 'full' license.
    No yearly safety inspections on bikes, so nobody has those ugly fork stickers or placards.
    As for riding off road...that's a farce...sort of. The majority of New Brunswick (Canada) is woods, but there is no bike trail system. There are official 'managed' trails through the provincial ATV federation, and maintained (grading, dozing, bridges over running water, etc) by the area ATV clubs. 2-wheeled bikes are not permitted on an official, managed ATV trail..subject to fine by the OREO's...the Off Road Enforcement Offers, a part of the RCMP cruising the trails on ATVs and snowmobiles. There is also a network of managed snowmobile trails, open to use by anyone through spring/summer/fall (until around the middle of December when they start grooming). After that point, anyone not a snowmobile can be fined, or more likely, beaten and left in the woods for dead by pissed off snowmobilers. It sounds great that anyone can run the snowmobile trails in the off season, but because of the fact that they're 'trails' when there's snow and ice over them, they often pass right through the middle of bogs...also, rocky and rough trails that would just beat you to death.
    The ATV federation use a $100/year pass system for their managed trails. The snowmobile federation has a pass system, more expensive for most but the price drops with the age of your sled.
    You cannot buy a trail pass for the ATV trails for a 2-wheeled bike. The clubs won't sell you one even though they're always crying hard times. Even if a club did actually sell one, the OREOs have stated in no uncertain terms that a motorcycle does not fit the definition of 'an ATV' in the act, and will fine you.
    The ATV federation won't share their trails with the snowmobile federation, so there are usually trails in the woods running somewhat parallel to each other or at least ending up at the same place...ATVs only on one, sleds only on the other..and each of the federations running their own groomers day and night. The ATV federation won't allow motorcycles on their ATV trails even though they say they can't afford groomer fuel, even though there are tons of dual sport and dirt bike riders that would drop the $100 for a pass for their trails in a heartbeat.
    All that said, pretty much the rest of the trails are fair game. There are no OHV parks or 'state forests' that you have to pay a fee to enter and ride. Crown land is open to everyone, with small exceptions like newly lumbered and reforested areas being gated off. People around here are pretty good about land use, and the only big plots of private land that's usually posted No Trespassing is placed where people are actively working, cutting wood, etc.
    My rule of thumb when finding a little 'Hmmm, I wonder what's down there?" road or trail is, if there's no sign, chain, gate, or rope across it, and it doesn't have a civic number sign by the road, it's open to go explore.
    I can't complain...the trails that are closed to bikes because they're managed ATV trails are a tiny drop in the bucket if you look at the amount of trails and dirt/lumber roads that are wide open for riding.

    I just really can't understand why the ATV and sled federations can't play together...share the trails and share the grooming in the winter.
    littletommy, Ken, ejfranz and 2 others like this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Nevada is pretty liberal, one can now even drive side-by-sides on public roads in towns with less than 100,000 residents. Usually no special permits other than for a few localities like Sand Mountain, a dune riding park outside Fallon. Motor vehicle use regulations on Federal lands within the state simply state that vehicles must conform to Nevada state law.
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    Senior Member Chip's Avatar
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    Ever try riding a sled down a trail that has been destroyed by an ATV?? We have the same issues in WI.

    Our biggest problem is the state taking over and tarring the rail road right a ways for bicyclist. Once the state takes them over there is NO motorized recreational use, PERIOD. Even though the snowmobilers are the ones that secured the use of the old rail ways.
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    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    Shucks, in Nevada there are still open road races like the Silver State Classic where you can hang it out over 90 miles of highway. 250 mph speeds over the finish line have been recorded, but not for this old ’37 Ford.

    Or take a drive to Virginia City.

    Hijack, if just for the sound effects...nothing to do with Riding Regulations
    Last edited by Fred; 11-15-2017 at 06:22 PM.
    ejfranz, Ken and Tweaker like this.
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    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    When we went to the Black Hills in South Dakota we had to get an OHV sticker there as they didn't recognize Idaho's OHV sticker. So, best to check with each state ahead of time and what area in a state such as state land or federal land requirements.

    Generally, in Idaho your good to go if your vehicles are registered, licensed, proper OHV stickers and what not in your state or province. Idaho will recognize yours at least for a time period.

    It's way too complicated for me to navigate the information and present it here as fact. Old web information is mixed with current information.

    Here are some links if you're interested.

    https://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov.../atv-motorbike

    https://www.offroad-ed.com/idaho/stu...401_700074556/

    https://www.offroad-ed.com/idaho/atv-law.html

    http://idahostateatv.org/IdahoOHVSurvey.pdf
    littletommy and Ken like this.
    Hidden Content A ride in the woods helps me relax and release tension. The fact I'm dragging a body should be entirely irrelevant?

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    Senior Member Fred's Avatar
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    California: “As I do not plan to be riding in California in the summer, I believe I am good to go. I see that there are areas that are closed from June 30 to Sept 1. Anyone care to explain what is needed in this state.

    In California if your motorcycle is street legal and currently insured and registered in any state or nation you usually need no further permits for operation on or off-road. The seasonal closure cited refers only to “
    red sticker” vehicles, i.e. ORVs manufactured after 2003 that are not compliant with CARB emission standards ( Think modern 2-stokes ) . Non-compliant pre-2003 ORVs and all complaint ORVs require a green sticker for off-road operation on public lands. These seasonal closures
    for red sticker vehicles are based on air quality concerns and varies by location and date.
    These regulations are not relevant for dual purpose bikes like our liscenced TWs.
    I fell into a grey area once when my Washington plated KDX 2-stroke’s legality was questioned on a forest service road above Sonora Pass. It took well over an hour for a female ranger, then a sheriff, then a Federal Law Enforcement agent to show up, argue with each other about jurisdiction and statute interpretation issues, call in to supervisors and Washington DMV before they finally released me. The unfortunate part was during the time the Law Enforcement Agent interviened I had to be uncomfortably handcuffed “for my protection”. No apologies were ever offered for their infringement on my rights. The presumption of innocence is limited to the judicial system, law enforcement often operates on the assumption of guilt.
    2003 TW200 "Betty Boop"
    2006 TW200 "Nibbler", a.k.a. “Mr.Gizmo"
    Hidden Content All Things Considered I’ld Rather Be Motorcycling

  9. #8
    Senior Member admiral's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    California: “As I do not plan to be riding in California in the summer, I believe I am good to go. I see that there are areas that are closed from June 30 to Sept 1. Anyone care to explain what is needed in this state.

    In California if your motorcycle is street legal and currently insured and registered in any state or nation you usually need no further permits for operation on or off-road. The seasonal closure cited refers only to “
    red sticker” vehicles, i.e. ORVs manufactured after 2003 that are not compliant with CARB emission standards ( Think modern 2-stokes ) . Non-compliant pre-2003 ORVs and all complaint ORVs require a green sticker for off-road operation on public lands. These seasonal closures
    for red sticker vehicles are based on air quality concerns and varies by location and date.
    These regulations are not relevant for dual purpose bikes like our liscenced TWs.
    I fell into a grey area once when my Washington plated KDX 2-stroke’s legality was questioned on a forest service road above Sonora Pass. It took well over an hour for a female ranger, then a sheriff, then a Federal Law Enforcement agent to show up, argue with each other about jurisdiction and statute interpretation issues, call in to supervisors and Washington DMV before they finally released me. The unfortunate part was during the time the Law Enforcement Agent interviened I had to be uncomfortably handcuffed “for my protection”. No apologies were ever offered for their infringement on my rights. The presumption of innocence is limited to the judicial system, law enforcement often operates on the assumption of guilt.
    Even if you were riding a motorcycle that wasn't plated and compliant, handcuffing you during the process, shame on them or whoever did the handcuffing. That is just ridiculous.
    littletommy, ejfranz, Ken and 1 others like this.
    Hidden Content A ride in the woods helps me relax and release tension. The fact I'm dragging a body should be entirely irrelevant?

  10. #9
    Senior Member ejfranz's Avatar
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    So Fred, would my 96 DT200 street legal smoker lead to me being handcuffed in California?
    littletommy, Ken and WECSOG like this.
    2001 TW200 sporting a MT43 up front. Duro has gone to a good home. 2015 VStrom XT, 1996 DT 200, Broken 2010 Xingue 400 XY. 2009 WR250r now shared with my son.

  11. #10
    Senior Member ejfranz's Avatar
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    Fred This video showed up after one of the ones you posted above


    Can you look into getting all the info this guy has into your videos: Heart-rate, elevation, grade, speed, distance and where you are on the course?

    For those of you with some time to kill this is so far is a good watch (I am at the 12 min mark). Admiral you may want to look away around 4:30 mark as the rider does the unspeakable - cross country.
    This looks to be a fun ride, but I would not want to race it.
    littletommy, admiral and Ken like this.
    2001 TW200 sporting a MT43 up front. Duro has gone to a good home. 2015 VStrom XT, 1996 DT 200, Broken 2010 Xingue 400 XY. 2009 WR250r now shared with my son.

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