Another Arrow, Peter's Leap
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Thread: Another Arrow, Peter's Leap

  1. #1
    Senior Member B-dub's Avatar
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    Another Arrow, Peter's Leap

    About a year and a half ago my older brother introduced me to a bit of history that I found very interesting as I have a love for history and aviation. He showed me a concrete arrow used as a navigational aid by early airmail pilots. Between the two of us we were able to locate 3 more arrows in our area, and made a ride to check them out. The ride report for that little adventure, and a little bit of history about the arrows is located here.

    Recently the word has really gotten out about the arrows, that stretch from coast to coast and to various parts of the US. There have been two news stories by TV stations recently, and a lot more discussion on the internet. This has led me to do more research in an effort to find more of the arrows. If this is something that interests you, just do a google search for concrete navigation arrows, and you'll find plenty of good reading on the subject. Don't neglect the comments on the blogs as a lot of good information is shared there as well.

    I was able to locate another arrow by research on the internet. I also located a possible site by using Google Earth, and decided to make a ride to check them out. Coincidentally there were some aviation events going on that I wanted to check out as well.

    I started by riding to the St. George airport where there is a small aviation museum that is home to a couple of MIG fighter jets. I knew they were sponsoring a fly in this month, but wasn't sure of the date so thought I would ride by to see what I could see. Luckily I arrived just as the jets were taxiing out to take off. I think those 3 jets in trail are from the Oregon Air Force. Must've heard that a certain Idaho rider is thinking of a trip to southern Utah to recruit some allies.



    The jets made several passes over the airfield. It was fun to watch and hear them. After they landed I rode over to the RC field where they were also having a fly-in. Same thing happened, I rode up just in time to see a flurry of activity, then things slowed down a bit. After watching for awhile I decided to head up the road to find the arrows.

    On my way to the first arrow I passed through Leeds. Leeds is a nice little town with some interesting history. I stopped to check out some things I hadn't seen before. Here's a nicely restored early stone building.



    What Leeds looked like about 100 years ago. I'll have to go back and see if I can get a shot from the same vantage point.



    There's an interesting story to this home. The owner saved one of the mills at nearby Silver Reef from exploding. The owners of the mill rewarded him handsomely, and he used the money to build his home. It was the nicest home in Leeds at the time.



    Any guesses what this might be? I have an idea, but we'll see what you think.





    The first potential arrow site was located east of Leeds. I rode to the area, then with my GPS hiked to the site I had marked. No joy. This is what I found.



    After getting home and studying the picture I think I might have to go back with a shovel. The size and shape of the depression leads me to believe there might be an arrow under there yet. The whole area is sandy, and it might have been covered by the drifting sand. It's a long shot, but worth checking out.

    On the way back to the TW, which was parked near an old mine, I discovered an old trash heap which kind of dated the mine. There was an old muffler, and a few other things which indicated the mine wasn't from the original Silver Reef boom. Anybody need a (well) used water container? Looks kinda like Admiral's gas tank (the bullet holes).



    On my way to the next arrow I rode the old Arrowhead Trail, which became Highway 91, now replaced by Interstate 15. I had plotted the course with my GPS, so the arrow was pretty easy to find. I had unknowingly rode by it on an earlier ride. I don't think many people know about this one.



    This arrow is at the top of the Black Ridge, at much higher elevation than the others I've been too. You can see the effects of the freeze thaw cycles on it.



    Still a little red paint left.



    This arrow is within a stone's throw from a modern communications antenna installed within the last couple of years, and plainly visible from I-15 near the top of the Black Ridge.



    After checking out the arrow I walked back and found the TW patiently waiting for me. I didn't even have to throw the reins down, or anything.




    I decided to ride on down to Peter's Leap. Peter's Leap is where one of the original wagon roads into southern Utah crossed a deep ravine. More info here, if you're interested. On the way down I found some fall colors. Not nearly as nice as those in New England (looking forward to those pictures), but hey, we take what we can get - right?



    It was pretty rough and rocky going but eventually I arrived where my GPS said Peter's Leap was. I got off and hiked around a little looking for the road down the ravine. After walking out to the point, I decided the waypoint on my GPS for Peter's Leap was on the other side of the ravine.



    I didn't want to see it bad enough to climb down the ravine and back up the other side, but thought I would check out another trail that forked off not too far back. Bingo! There it is.




    Actually, the road is just to the left of the TW, but you can get an idea of why they called it Peter's Leap.



    Yep, that's the road!



    Let's see if I can get a better shot. I consider the TW a lot more capable than an old wagon, but I still didn't want to ride it down that road!



    In this shot you can see the road up the other side. Not nearly as bad.



    By the time I got through checking out Peter's Leap the shadows were getting long, so I decided to head for home. I rode a bit of history out to the pavement.



    Once I hit I-15 the ride home was all pavement, so pretty uneventful.

    I hope you enjoyed the ride, I did!

















    Last edited by B-dub; 10-21-2013 at 11:35 AM.
    Braden, r80rt, Mel and 6 others like this.
    My handle is B-dub, I ride a T-dub, and drive a V-dub.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator littletommy's Avatar
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    Nice, thanks for sharing, very interesting.

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    Senior Member r80rt's Avatar
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    Outstanding!
    Only a fool would attempt it, and God help me, I am that fool!

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    Senior Member joeband's Avatar
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    very cool. there are old wagon passes like that in the sierras.... boggles the mind some of the things they crossed.
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    Senior Member jbfla's Avatar
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    B-dub, thanks for the ride.

    I'm an aviation history buff too. But had not heard of the arrows...very cool.

    jb
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    Senior Member MCC1776's Avatar
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    Thanks for the history lesson
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    Senior Member B-dub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by littletommy View Post
    Nice, thanks for sharing, very interesting.
    You're welcome, glad you liked it.

    Quote Originally Posted by r80rt View Post
    Outstanding!
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by joeband View Post
    very cool. there are old wagon passes like that in the sierras.... boggles the mind some of the things they crossed.
    Yeah, after travelling for hundreds of miles by wagon or foot, just the sight of the Rocky Mountains or Sierras would've caused my heart to fail me. They were definitely some tough folks to accomplish what they did. I don't know if they had a "can do" attitude, or a "we have to do it" attitude. Probably some of both.
    My handle is B-dub, I ride a T-dub, and drive a V-dub.

  9. #8
    Senior Member B-dub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbfla View Post
    B-dub, thanks for the ride.

    I'm an aviation history buff too. But had not heard of the arrows...very cool.

    jb
    You're welcome.

    For the last year and a half since finding the first four arrows I've been looking off and on for more arrows - without success. So, I was pretty excited to find another one. I'll keep looking for some more, cause I think it's cool, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by MCC1776 View Post
    Thanks for the history lesson
    You're welcome, it was my pleasure.
    MCC1776 likes this.
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  10. #9
    Senior Member B-dub's Avatar
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    OK, if nobody is going to take a guess as to what the wagon mounted contraption is, I will. It's just a guess, but I'm thinking maybe it's a pump for putting out fires. The post on top is what they manipulated to pump the water? Any other ideas?
    Fred likes this.
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  11. #10
    Member FishByte's Avatar
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    Thanks B-dub! I heard about those arrows as a kid from my Grandpa in Cedar City. I finally have my bike running and can't wait to start exploring the St George area. So far it has been short trips around the neighborhood and airport. Nothing to exciting.

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