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Hey folks. I live in an area where we have been snowed in 2-3 days a year. The snow is accompanied by ice and 25% grades. I have no choice but to go to work anyhow, and have skied (2 hours) then Jeep Rubicon with chains and Low Gear allowed me to be the only person getting out of the neighborhood.

I just sold the jeep for a Sprinter van. So now I have to figure out how to get out.

My TW200 would be the best option, but from searching looks like the front just pushes in snow that deep. I see a few have tried a ski up front, a la a timbersled conversion but lacking the wide tracks in back...not going to float. I found a great deal on a timbersled with a Honda 450, but then committed to having 2 toys to maintain and 2 hours to convert to the sled.

Rokons are about the same price used but again another toy to maintain. I have a bunch of kids who might enjoy having a second toy however. And we bought the tw200 for that reason, and to be able to put it on a hitch rack.

No snow machine for me just for 3 days a year and no room to store something that big.

What would you do?
 

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The Rokon I've had a couple in WI winters in deep snow. They are slow and it's a job to brake trail. Sure they will crawl over or through the snow to a point. 2 feet of heavy wet snow your SOL. Lite fluffy snow it will plow right through. Biggest problem with the Rokon is 5 horsepower just isn't enough, period.

I have had a Snow Hawk which is sort of like a Timber sled. They are awesome for braking trail in virgin snow. Nearly impossible to ride on a hard packed trail or road. Front ski will pull and take whatever track it wants. Throwing the machine all over the place. Maybe things have gotten better with the Timber bike.
 

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I believe only a tracked vehicle can ascend a 25% snow slope. You imply deep snow and the need to float on top but not the distance to be traversed under those conditions.
My solution was to buy a mid-size 4x4 tractor and plow the road open for my family and neighbors. I sometimes plow at night. But that is significant investment not recommended in this situation.
Assuming you could not take those 2-3 days off a year like your neighbors I would suggest looking into an older affordable running snowmobile and tarp it over balance of the year. Possibly recoup investment, or build good will and satisfaction by shuttling neighbors in and out if your work schedule permits.
Try deducting the expense from your taxes, call it a casualty loss abatement or business expense if self-employed. It just might float by the IRS better than a TW floats in the snow.:D
 
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