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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Right now I have my tw equipped with 14/44 gearing for the road. I like how it can cruise 45-50 comfortably now and up to 60 is doable for short periods when needed w/o the mirrors buzzing up (that kicked in at dead-on 56 mph stock gearing...I think that red 55 is there for a reason!)



However I don't like how when I go to take off the bike struggles a little bit I guess cause the gearing is a little tall. It's like you gotta force anything you do when it comes to slow speed, keeping the engine running high enough to pull properly and such which takes some fun away.



So I wanna know: Is 14/47 considerably better, does it come anywhere close to feeling as strong as stock gearing whilst keeping the engine speed down a little? When I got the bike with 14/50 I loved the low end power, take offs were effortless and easy and it felt like I could idle up a moderate hill, but the bike didn't even like cruising at 45 so that was kinda limited for road use on the fun 45 mph back roads and such. I know 14/47 can't be AS good as stock, but I basically want to know if it's a big enough improvement over 44 to make buying a 47 worth it. Otherwise I'll stick with the 44 and pop the 50 on every once in a while, maybe winter time or something when you don't wanna go fast anyway.



I also want to know if 15/47 would be better or different than 14/44? I know the gear ratio there is pretty much the same, but I'm wondering if maybe a bigger front would make a difference anyway in regards to a little more overall low end usability.



Thanks, DS
 

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I run 14/47 and consider it on par with stock (14/50) without as much buzz. I've tried the 14/44 and did not like it but I'm trying to run interstate speeds, and 14/44 was way too tall for my liking.



I can't imagine the small diameter difference going to a 15/47 would make any difference, definitely not worth the expense.
 

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Go with 14/47. It's nice for the road. I've found it too high geared for the more difficult offroad trails though. On my first trail ride (w/ the 14/47 setup) last week, we came across a VERY steep loose rocky trail on the crest of the Cascade Range... we went down it and had to come back up (trail was impassable). It was spooky... I ended up burning clutch, bogging down, and barely made it up, even with assistance. Gonna have to go dual sprockets or switch them out depending on what I'm doing...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ya'll feel that 47 is nearly as good as 50 huh? That's really nice to hear..I'm like 98% street with the TW and I'm not crazy when it comes to off road hill climbs and all that or else I'd get something crazy like 60-70T in the back, but I do like to explore every once and a while and climb easy fun hills/slopes and while the 44 will climb, the thing will struggle hard if I don't get the engine speed up there which can't be good for it working so hard.



47 sounds like it may be a winner, and if for whatever reason I need higher gearing every once and a while I can easily get a 15 to go up front for 15/47, if I've heard correctly the front is a whole lot faster to swap than the back. That would be perfect! Once my stock chain dies (it's on it's second to last adjustment, at 3850 Mi.) I'll get a new o-chain along with a 47 and pop it on and see if it's a much better bike in regards to low end and better power in all gears, especially 5th, it should be!



I run 14/47 and consider it on par with stock (14/50) without as much buzz. I've tried the 14/44 and did not like it but I'm trying to run interstate speeds, and 14/44 was way too tall for my liking.


Unless you're talking residential ones that are 60 mph, it's not going to happen with a TW man I'm sorry. Even with 14/44 I can barely stand to run the thing at 55 cause it sounds too fast @ 6200, yet some people run them at 55 stock.....Even if you went to a crazy gearing of something like 14/37 you'd be able to run 60-65 comfortably tops, and I bet you'd be lucky to even hold 60 with such a tall gearing and lack of power.



We need a watercooled TW300 with 6 gears, first 3 or 4 can be pretty low for off road and the top gears will be tall - but not too tall to comfortably run 60-70 on the street. Until that happens we're just not gonna hit highways properly, the thing isn't designed to handle good or even run at 65 anyway - mine is happiest at no more than 45 in terms of engine speed and handling.
 

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ya'll feel that 47 is nearly as good as 50 huh? That's really nice to hear..I'm like 98% street with the TW and I'm not crazy when it comes to off road hill climbs and all that or else I'd get something crazy like 60-70T in the back, but I do like to explore every once and a while and climb easy fun hills/slopes and while the 44 will climb, the thing will struggle hard if I don't get the engine speed up there which can't be good for it working so hard.



47 sounds like it may be a winner, and if for whatever reason I need higher gearing every once and a while I can easily get a 15 to go up front for 15/47, if I've heard correctly the front is a whole lot faster to swap than the back. That would be perfect! Once my stock chain dies (it's on it's second to last adjustment, at 3850 Mi.) I'll get a new o-chain along with a 47 and pop it on and see if it's a much better bike in regards to low end and better power in all gears, especially 5th, it should be!


With that many miles on the stock chain, I'd recommend at least evaluating your stock front sprocket. If the teeth are worn, replace it and o-ring it at the same time. Than you have 2 new gears and new chain and good to go.



I'd say the front and rear sprocket are both easily changed, but the front is probably faster. Changing the front you could tear the gasket when removing the cover and keep an eye out on the wires that could get pinched when replacing the cover, keep that in mind. Changing the rear needs the back of the bike propped up and there are a couple more bolts to remove and a couple parts to line up (axle spacer, rear brake drum). Overall, I'd say it's a wash as to what's faster depending on if you tear the gasket, pinch the wires, getting the parts lined in the rear, etc.



I think you'll like the 47 a lot more.
 

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I prefer messing with the rear sprocket. The front is just too much of a pain between the skid plate, side cover gasket, wires, oil, etc...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh I didn't even realize the sprocket was in the engine cover and required such precision...



I wonder why.. I have a ttr-125 off road bike and it's pretty similar to the tw in many ways and the front sprocket simply has a little metal cover that has a few bolts and easily pops right off completely separate from the engine casing.



No wires engine covers or any of that to deal with. You could pop it off, and put it back on in less than 30 seconds with no risk of damage to any of the components.



Go figure....



Does this mean you must drain the oil every time you attempt a front sprocket change? Or does just a little leak out and you have to add a tiny bit? Maybe it won't be as convenient as I thought, but hopefully I'll be satisfied with 14/47 anyway and won't need a 15/47 swap out.
 

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I think the fat rear tire requires the front counter shaft to stick way out... so they incorporated a support bearing into the side housing... So yeah, unlike most bikes, you have to remove the whole side cover. I'm not sure how much oil comes out... The one time I replaced the front sprocket, I just went ahead and did an oil change...
 

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You can lean the bike over on its right side on something like a box and the oil won't run out when you remove the left side cover. Make sure everything is real clean before you take it apart so dirt doesn't fall in.



The output or drive shaft is supported on the far left side because the sprocket had to be moved to the left so the chain would clear the extra wide tire. There is a seal and a bearing inside the left hand cover. Plan on replacing the seal. It is just easier to replace it the first time than to have to go back and do it later. Trust me! There is also a seal where the shaft comes out of the block. If there is even a hint of leakage replace that one too. Ditto the shifter shaft.



All that being said, I run a 14/55 set up and I routinely cruise at 60 to 65 mph. I have over 12,500 miles on the engine and it runs fine. Sure, the mirrors are almost useless at that speed but so what? After half an hour or more of a "high speed" run I can pull up to a stop sign and the little engines idles like I just started it up. I take off and it is back up to speed without a hint of protest. I have done this during heat waves in the San Joaquin Valley with temps in excess of 100 degrees and my friend's water cooled Honda fan is going on and off and the TW just doesn't seem to care. Gas mileage does fall to around the mid 50's mpg. Again, so what?



At about 2500 miles I replaced the front and rear sprocket and the chain. The rear sprocket is a JT and still looks new. The chain is a DID non o-ring but I clean and oil it every 400 +/- miles and it too looks new. The front sprocket has no name on it and I think I got a cheap knock off POS. It is now loose on the shaft and the teeth are worn. I flipped it over to wear the other side of the teeth and now wish I had replaced it. I have a new JT 14t sprocket waiting to be installed as soon as the spirits get my lazy butt in gear.



Personally I wouldn't go less than 14/50 which I thought was a very good set up but I do like the 14/55 better. I also prefer dealing with the rear sprocket. I find it easier. To each their own. Just my opinion.
 

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I put an o-ring chain and new sprockets on at 2380 miles. 15 tooth front and 45 rear. Then 47 rear, and finally 50 rear where I have been for quite a while, and will probably stay. Tdub is at 7500 miles now and the chain has never got loose or needed adjustment. That's over 5000 miles and I believe part of that is the 15 tooth sprocket. I would always go with the 15 to reduce the stress on the chain, unless I was entering the Widowmaker.



regards, mac
 

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15/47 was too high for me. Starting off was tough on the clutch. The rpm gap between 4th and 5th was too big. Any hill or headwind pretty much made 5th gear useless.



Next sprocket set was 15/54, about the same ratio as stock, but longer lasting due to bigger sprockets. Still, I've done many 400 to 700 mile days on the highway and much dualsport riding with this sprocket set.



Currently running 15/50, probably the best set for street and mild offroad. Tdub on flat ground with no wind will maintain 70mph. Maintains speed better than 15/47. 4-5 gap isn't much of a problem. Not so tough on the clutch from a standing start.



I've seen little change in fuel efficiency among the various sprocket sets. Quality of fuel and riding style have much greater effect. Worst was 40mpg on gasohol WFO at 50-55mph with a strong headwind. Best was 101mpg on real gasoline at 35-40mph to Memphis and back via secondary roads.
 
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