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Pardon my ignorance but the service manual instructions for checking cam chain adj for an 07 are somewhat confusing to me. It appears to show how to check it off the bike and how to install it but once installed and for periodic maint. exactly how is it done? It it automatic? The slotted rod in mine appears to be about 1/2" inside the housing. I appreciate anyone's help. Thanks.
 

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On anything 2001 or newer( that has not had the cylinder swapped) the chain tensioner is automatic.
 

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The only thing you should check is the timing chain stretch.
Rotate the crankshaft to TDC and than check the mark on the cam sprocket and the cylinder head.
The perfect position is, if both are in a line.
The chain has to be changed, if the difference between both marks is close to a teeth.
-->> If the chain has to be changed, do also check the timing chain guide. Sometimes it also have to be changed (around 30,000-50,000 km [18,750-31,250 miles]).

Regards,
Sebastian
 

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Is replacing the cam chain an easy job on these, like it is on an S40 Suzuki? In other words, you don't have to split the cases?
 

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Is replacing the cam chain an easy job on these, like it is on an S40 Suzuki? In other words, you don't have to split the cases?
They should normally be good for 30,000 miles or so. Is there a problem with yours now? No, you don't have to split the cases.
 

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It's no big deal to change the chain.
Remove:
- cam sprocket cover
- cam sprocket
- generator cover
- rotator
-> rear axle can be used as puller
- starter sprocket
 

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Note: I can say changing the cam chain would be easier if still mounted in the frame. I removed the internals after removing from the chain and had to take extra measures to keep the engine from "spinning or turning over" when removing some of these parts.

As Macbig2k1 mentions, after removing the left side cover and the associated parts of the cam chain sprocket, you can use the rear axle to remove the flywheel/rotor. I tried using a ratchet but this would not work, so I used an impact wrench. This removed the Flywheel/rotor easily.


Once that is removed, you then need to remove the flywheel. You can see the cam chain underneath. I have removed this, but without going out to look at the engine I can't tell you how easily it is removed. I'm guessing since I did it, it can't be that hard. I'll add to this after I go and look at it.
 
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The only thing you should check is the timing chain stretch.
Rotate the crankshaft to TDC and than check the mark on the cam sprocket and the cylinder head.
The perfect position is, if both are in a line.
The chain has to be changed, if the difference between both marks is close to a teeth.
-->> If the chain has to be changed, do also check the timing chain guide. Sometimes it also have to be changed (around 30,000-50,000 km [18,750-31,250 miles]).

Regards,
Sebastian
What kind of cam chain do you use? One from Yamaha or an aftermarket one?
 

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We should thank Admiral for taking the time to hammer out such good photos while in the middle of a rebuild. These, and photos by others, are rather helpful guides when wrenching on something new. Thanks Kris!
 

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No, I don't own a TW. But, there is one for sale nearby that I am thinking about. And, I like to know about what I'm buying (if I get it). The Japanese have there problems in cam chains, tensioners, guides etc. I won't go into the specifics, but an example is the Suzuki S40/Savage.But, being a single, on that bike it is a relatively easy job to replace the tensioner and chain.

And, thanks for those great photos!!
 

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No, I don't own a TW. But, there is one for sale nearby that I am thinking about. And, I like to know about what I'm buying (if I get it). The Japanese have there problems in cam chains, tensioners, guides etc. I won't go into the specifics, but an example is the Suzuki S40/Savage.But, being a single, on that bike it is a relatively easy job to replace the tensioner and chain.

And, thanks for those great photos!!
Seems like in Hawaii, if a TW came up for sale, you better jump on it fast or it would be gone...
 
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