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Discussion Starter #1
Over Christmas I came back home to visit with family and brought the TW down and got it running fine. New battery and running some good gas is all it needed. I left it at my folks house because I was too busy with work to ride it up in Houston. So its Easter now and I am back and ready to ride. I went ahead and pulled the battery to charge it before just for good measure and not have any issues.

So now the battery is in and no Power to anything at all, indicator lights don't work and the starter doesnt turn at all. I installed the battery and hit the starter button, i saw the neutral light come on and heard a slight click, the nothing, everything is dead. It did have power to everything very briefly.
- the battery reads 12.8 V, when the ignition switch is on it read 0.2 V
- fuses looked good, replaced them anyway with fuses that have little LEDs to show power, they show nothing at all
- the starter relay shows 12.8 V, when the ignition switch is on it reads 0.2 V
- AND the last time i rode the flasher relay came loose and melted on the exhaust, i just noticed that after messing with everything today

so i am having trouble seeing the forest for the trees. all these variables are throwing me off. could i have shorted out and busted the starter relay? could the battery be bad(new 12/2016)?

looking for any thoughts or guidance y'all might have, thank you.
 

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Disconnect the battery and jump start it straight off a car battery. Make sure the car is Off. If it starts right up you know if is battery related.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
using the jumper cables all the accessory lights come on, so its looking like my new battery is junk. looks like monday morning is the first opportunity i will have to get a battery here in Corpus. I will post then the results, which will hopefully be i have a running bike. thanks for the help.
 

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Some shops can kill a brand new battery before it even goes into the machine:

The biggest single harm that can be done to the life expectancy of a new battery usually occurs when it's sold. In the rush to get a new machine set up for sale or to get the customer out the door with his new replacement battery, many batteries are simply filled with electrolyte, installed and pressed into service within minutes of being unwrapped. Sound familiar? It's all wrong. What this procedure buys you is a battery that will never have more than 80% of its power ever! For this reason, many riders prefer to prep their new batteries themselves to make sure it's done correctly.
Here's the actual factory-recommended service procedure, and don't be too surprised if you've never heard it before.
First, unwrap the battery, unkink the vent tube and snip about a half-inch off the end, unless it's a maintenance-free type and doesn't have a vent tube. Next, fill it with electrolyte midway between the high and low level markings on the case. Next, let the battery sit for one or two hours after which the battery will still be at only 65% of full charge. Check the electrolyte level and add electrolyte if required. That's right add electrolyte. This is the only time in the life of your battery that you can ever add anything but water.
Now surprise you must still charge the battery. If it is a refillable lead-antimony type, it should be charged at one-third of its rated capacity in amp/hours for four to five hours to get it to full charge. Honda and Yuasa recommend that the maintenance-free type should be charged with a constant-current charger that can drive the charge with as much as 16.9 volts and closely monitored not to exceed full charge (another reason to buy a smart charger). Afterwards, recheck the level and add water if required. Finally, let the battery cool so the case contracts enough to fit into its typically tight little holder, run the new breather tube (if it has one) carefully through the original factory routing, being sure that it's well away from your chain and you're ready to go.

I would not even use the above figure....Charge it overnight at 2 amps with a smart charger like Battery Tender Jr. Insist that the shop ONLY add electrolyte or just give you the dry battery. An AGM, on the other hand, only needs a nice long gentle charge as above. Spill proof too. A much better battery if your bike ever takes naps. :p

 

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Make sure your own battery charger hasn't killed your battery. Some chargers can either overcharge significantly, or even be broken to the point of draining the battery instead, regardless of how long it's attached to the charger. Electronic smart chargers are the way to go.
 
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