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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, so I really despise the clip master link, but it seems there is also trouble when installing a rivet style link.

I know a rivet style would probably (maybe?) be harder to install in the woods to repair a chain. A clip style link would be somewhat "easier".

Is one stronger than the other? I know if the clip style link chain outer plate is not pressed far enough onto the pins, the clip grooves on the chain posts are not exposed enough and trying to install the clip will destroy it by splitting the clip. It has happened to me several times, thankfully in the garage and not in the woods.

I now know, from multiple failures ($5 each times 5), that I must really get that plate pressed onto the master link pins before attempting the clip installation.

Wondering if buying rivet style is worth it and finding the correct tool for mushrooming the head of the pins.
 

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My preference is the clip style link with slip on plates.
That certainly makes it easier, especially if you have to add/remove a section of chain for dual sprockets in the field.

However, motorcycle chain generally has a press fit side plate, just in case the spring clip falls off.

I've actually never heard of a riveted master link for motorcycle chain.

Honestly, a press fit master link with the clip oriented properly (open end trailing) should never give you a problem, and it's just as strong as the rest of the chain.

Even a slip fit side plate is plenty strong, especially for our purposes... you just don't want to lose the spring clip!
 

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I like the "modified" clip master link -- easy on and easy off.

P6230065.JPG

Same thing for o-ring chain only if in the boon docks and can't compress o-rings enough to get it back together then omit the o-rings on one side of the link. Or you can use a non-o-ring master link on an o-ring chain.

And of course you never leave home without a spare master link, do you?

P4100623.JPG
 

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An example of a non-o-ring master link on an o-ring chain.

Mst. Lnk1.jpg

I tried safety wiring the master link once. I used the little wire used to close a loaf of bread plastic bag. It stayed on though I am not sure it was ever needed. It was an o-ring master link hence the excess grease and picture taken right after I assembled it. I don't bother with the safety wire anymore.
P2260836.JPG
 

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.

I've actually never heard of a riveted master link for motorcycle chain.
I was under the impression that virtually all stock motorcycle chains had a riveted master link. The "clip-style" is considered to be literally the weakest link in a chain.

The trick I used when replacing the chain on my KTM was recommended on the ADVRider forum: Vise-Grips bearing down on a bb to flare out the rivet head. Did the trick without having to shell out for a special chain tool.

That said, a clip-style master link would probably hold up fine on a TW200, and would make roadside repairs easier if needed.

I'm going to go take a peak at my 2017 and see how it came from the factory.

edited to add:

Color me mistaken: my TW does have a clip-style master link. Maybe its only on higher-powered bikes that that's considered a liability.

Oh, and I love the idea of a spare master link on the key - what's a good source for those?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I like the idea of the spare using slightly opened plate holes for the pins! And omitting the o-rings when assembling (in the field). That would be 1000X easier than trying to press the plate on in the field and then loosing or breaking the clip in half because the grooves aren't exposed enough (so hard for me to see something that small and dark). I have literally spent $30 on master links, just because of broken clips......Learning...Slowly...
I think my biggest issue has been correctly and fully compressing the plate onto the link so that enough of the clip grooves are exposed to actually install the clip without having it split in half. Once it cracks, it's useless, and then have to get another whole master link kit, and throw out the rest. I looked for just the clips only and I can't find them online. I would just buy a bag of them.

Funny thing is as I wrote the last sentence, I realized I could actually have them made where I work. It's just a stamping on a progressive die. But it wouldn't be cost effective to make here in the USA.
 

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I pondered the same question to myself when I upgraded to a 428VX chain and new 47T sprocket. To the point that I ordered one of each and made my decision of which to install when I finally got around to the project.
You answered already in your question what came to mind and made me decide...


not going to be able to change a riveted Master Link in the woods without bringing more tools so...
IMG_5856.JPG

went with the Master Link Clip. That's what is on all stock TW's anyway. This 428 one is even beefier.
IMG_5860.jpg


IMG_6329.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I pondered the same question to myself when I upgraded to a 428VX chain and new 47T sprocket. To the point that I ordered one of each and made my decision of which to install when I finally got around to the project.
You answered already in your question what came to mind and made me decide...


not going to be able to change a riveted Master Link in the woods without bringing more tools so...
View attachment 115026

went with the Master Link Clip. That's what is on all stock TW's anyway. This 428 one is even beefier.
View attachment 115034


View attachment 115042
That's the exact link I buy from the Yamaha dealership and online. Part FJ428VX . After having had the chain off-on a few (4!!!) times already at home, I hate the thought of doing it in the woods, mud, heat, bugs, leg cramps....Ugh... Hope I never break one again.
 

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I used to break clips fairly regularly. I would install or remove them by spreading one leg out and lifting it over the rivet. It worked but fatigue set in and it would break.

Later I was told the correct way to do it is to slide it onto the rivets. Since I started doing it this way I have only broken one clip. It does stretch the clip some so it is loose on the rivet but it won't come off.

This may seem really basic but at one time I didn't know it until someone told.
To remove:
Remove1.JPG

Install:
Install1.JPG

Notched pliers and having the master link on the sprocket help a lot. The sprocket gives it support so you can lean on it.
Notch.JPG
 

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I used to break clips fairly regularly. I would install or remove them by spreading one leg out and lifting it over the rivet. It worked but fatigue set in and it would break.

Later I was told the correct way to do it is to slide it onto the rivets. Since I started doing it this way I have only broken one clip. It does stretch the clip some so it is loose on the rivet but it won't come off.

This may seem really basic but at one time I didn't know it until someone told.
To remove:
View attachment 115274

Install:
View attachment 115290

Notched pliers and having the master link on the sprocket help a lot. The sprocket gives it support so you can lean on it.
View attachment 115298


I learnt sump'in today. I used a FT screwdriver to tap the clip on and off. I feel so stupid I never thought to use pliers or something similar. Thanks for posting this.
 

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I learnt sump'in today. I used a FT screwdriver to tap the clip on and off. I feel so stupid I never thought to use pliers or something similar. Thanks for posting this.
I can do it with just a small, flat bladed screwdriver, but I usually use a screwdriver and some needlenosed pliers. The pliers give me more control and I am less likely to send the clip flying somewhere I'll never find it :eek:.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I have found the O-Rings are what hold the press-on plate back when trying to expose the grooves on the ends. If the plate is not really pressed all the way the pin grooves look like they are exposed, but not quite enough, and when I try to slide the clip over the grooves, it causes the clip to expand too much and that tempered steel clip can't handle too much stress and either cracks or breaks completely.

I have modified a Chain breaker tool to function correctly with the pin sizes that are on the O Ring chain so it can be used as a press.

I still hate the idea of breaking a chain link in the woods again. I'll replace it every few thousand miles regardless of riding. It'll put my mind at ease.

EDIT: I am extremely familiar with many types of steels and alloys. This clip material is untrustworthy beyond just one installation. It's really a one-shot-get-it-right-the-first-time-or-else kind of spring steel. I haven't tested how corrosion resistant it is, but I think this is a regular blue tempered spring steel, with an oxide coat to prevent corrosion. Blue temper hates being bent beyond it's elastic limit. These clips are very thin near the through hole radius, and they get spread quite a bit. I would not feel comfortable riding a clip that was on-off-on again.
 

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If one slides the clip on and off properly as elime demonstrates in post #14 there is minimal stress imparted to the clip thus resulting in ability to have many troubler free on/off cycles without damage to the clip or balance of master link.
Try not to bend, pry, or lever the clip. It should slide right on with minimal squeezing of the pliers.
 
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