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Found this 89 w/10k miles after running a "WTB" on craigslist for about 6 months. I wasnt able to give it the once over before purchase though as the guy lives far away and offered to deliver when he was passing through. I figure $200, for a bike that appears to all be there and has a title is an ok gamble.

Anyway, the story is that PO bought it about 10 years ago to ride during college. Never put it on the road though and just ended up riding as a dirt bike for a bit. It has been in shed now for 8 years. PO's PO swapped the front end out with, he believes, a RM 80 and also swapped the stock front wheel to the back.

With that, what do you guys think? Any ID on the front end? Should I go back to stock, stay or upgrade to something else? What of the swingarm, is it stock? I dont know enough about them to tell.

I bought an old one as my state allows for antique vehicle registration, thus no annual inspection or registration fees.

http://i.imgur.com/MCbuGqI.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/r3D4CxI.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/jE7y9ft.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/skYjAwK.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/faDrM3k.jpg
 

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At least he didn't fib to ya.

Swinger appears to be stock.

It appears that he has moved the front brake drum to the rear, then laced to the drum. The TW front drum provides a much better rear brake than stock.

Front end is indeed early RM. But the drum is much bigger than my RM80's front end. Possibly 125?

Nice score. I'd rock it as-is. looks like you've got the stock rear rim if you ever want to go back.
 

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If you need a winter project, there ya go. A frame with a title is worth $200.00. And, that's about all I would gamble on this one.
 

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If you need a winter project, there ya go. A frame with a title is worth $200.00. And, that's about all I would gamble on this one.
IF it runs and the cylinder walls haven't pitted the only dealbreaker I can see are the pitted fork tubes, which you could probably eBay for 10 bucks. The rest is "sweat equity" and makeup. I wouldn't be too quick to put it back to stock. There are worse things than the changes the PO has made. All he's done is XT-ize a TW.

Give me that thing for two days and its own mommy won't recognize it:p.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah my plan is to get it running first (oil, check/adjust vlaves, clean carb, clean tank, new fuel line) and then get it moving. The front tire is completely shot though so I will need new rubber. Not sure what to do about the front end in general hence my post. Like lizard said the tubes are pitted so maybe I should just go back to stock with them now? I will prob keep it pretty rough otherwise and just use it as a dirtbike for a bit. One that will let me shake it down and two it will give me time to decide what I want to do with it. I was drawn to the TW b/c of the reliability, community and aftermarket support. But I need time in the saddle to determine what path is right for my machine.
 

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Good find, the kickstarter assembly alone is worth almost what you paid for the bike.

I will defer to Lizrdbrth's knowledge of the front end. The swingarm is stock, however it looks like an extension piece has been welded onto the tab that engages the slot on the rear brake mounting plate. Also, I can't quite figure out how he was able to mount and lace the rear wheel/hub/brake to the TW rear hub and end up with unused spoke holes on the sprocket side hub?

Oh well, as long as it works . . .

Keep us posted, and welcome to the forum.
 

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Brian, take a look at the rear hub on his. The front brake drum on a stock TW bolts on to the hub, just like the rear. Same 3-bolt pattern. Except normally the rear drum does not hold spokes as it does up front.

All that was done here was to lace the larger diameter front brake into the rear in the same manner as the front. Pretty slick, actually.

You're correct, the engagement tab has to be shortened and the axle hole in the front backing plate needs to be bored to the same diameter as the rear axle. I'd be doing the same thing if I hadn't gone lazy mid-project:p. This pic shows a front drum bolted to the rear and the "normal" location of the rear spoke holes:




Of course you wouldn't need to do this if you wanted to keep the stock rear rim. You could just bolt it on as I have in the pic. But it's a pretty good way of dealing with the different front/rear spoke count issue when swapping rims.
 

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Hi Russ,

I understand the what he did on the brake side.

However, as you know, the stock TW rear wheel has a different spoke count than most wheels (fewer - maybe 32?) Take a close look at both the inside and outside views of the sprocket-side hub. There appears to be a regular spacing of open spoke holes. A regular TW hub on that side should have too few spoke holes or at least be filled up. Why would there be extra spoke holes and how would he have gotten a non stock hub on?

What am I missing?

Brian
 

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Wow. Good call on that. The math calls for a 34 spoke rim.

I thought I'd just killed a fat rat for the LSR bike.

Now I gots to know. Maybe Dubya can count some stuff for us.
 

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Brian, take a look at the rear hub on his. The front brake drum on a stock TW bolts on to the hub, just like the rear. Same 3-bolt pattern. Except normally the rear drum does not hold spokes as it does up front.

All that was done here was to lace the larger diameter front brake into the rear in the same manner as the front. Pretty slick, actually.

You're correct, the engagement tab has to be shortened and the axle hole in the front backing plate needs to be bored to the same diameter as the rear axle. I'd be doing the same thing if I hadn't gone lazy mid-project:p. This pic shows a front drum bolted to the rear and the "normal" location of the rear spoke holes:




Of course you wouldn't need to do this if you wanted to keep the stock rear rim. You could just bolt it on as I have in the pic. But it's a pretty good way of dealing with the different front/rear spoke count issue when swapping rims.
That is exactly what I did with my wide front wheel. I used a BW200 front brake on a modified TW rear wheel, leaving the TW spokes intact.

100_3560.JPG

100_3547.JPG

(Sorry about the thread hijack . . .)
 

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I don't consider it a hijack. Hope Dubya doesn't. I'm stumped. This makes his barn find all the more interesting.

How often does a guy get an opportunity to make such a contribution to TW swap-ology on his second post?
 

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Those look like interesting mods on the 89. I bet they rode it pretty hard off-road. My best friend jumped my Tw at least 5ft this weekend. The mighty t-dub can do just bout anything, I swear!
 

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I dont mind. What exact info are you looking for? I have worked on a number of bikes, but never once did anything with spokes or lacing or related.
When you have time can you count the number of spoke holes in the rim and the number of spokes coming from the left side of the hub vs. the right? That should unravel the mystery.

What you have there is some pretty creative parts swapping which could be of use to us all if the numbers add up.

Right now the combo isn't making much sense and we're trying to figure out how it was done. A stock TW uses 36 spokes up front and 32 in the rear. On paper and without the missing piece of the puzzle your hardware combo adds up to 34 spokes, yet that clearly appears to be a 36 hole TW front rim on the back of your bike.

36-hole rims of various widths are as common as rocks compared with 32-hole. The info could open up a lot of rim swap possibilities.

Some members are trying to keep a TW alive in countries where 14" tires are Unobtainium. Some would like to use rims from another bike like a cruiser just for looks or for better road tire availability and some prefer maneuverability over al-out traction and would kill for a $50 18" out back. I talked to a lot of folks at a recent HUBB meeting and the only drawback to the TW as a "world beater" RTW bike is that 14" rear tire. You can get an 18" dirt tire anywhere on the planet and have the equivalent of an XT225 with a much lower seat height, lower center of gravity, better low speed handling and weight carrying ability, etc..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ok, will do this evening.

What about the front end? What is the suggestion there? seals are long gone and the tubes are pitted. I figure my options are

1. replace just the tubes.
2. replace the whole works with stock or some other recommended upgrade.
3. other
 

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Others will chime in on that. Here's my .02 strictly from a cost standpoint.

The swap is already done. As long as the PO has done it correctly, the steering stops are in place and the forks don't bash the tank and if he had to do a bearing swap and everything works properly I'd try to swap the legs for unpitted ones and call it good. If I'm not mistaken RM tubes are 35 or 36mm compared to the TW's 33mm tubes, so they're a bit stiffer. I'm not quite as certain about the brake, but it oughtta get the job done for now.

RM front ends are a nickle.98 relative to a complete TW front end with wheel. Odds are that there was a bearing or steering stem swap involved and steering stop modifications to get the RM front end on there. Factor in the cost of swapping back to TW neck bearings and races and undoing any steering stop mods and take it from there.

For now I'd just stay on track with sorting out the motor to see just how well you've scored. We can help you undo the stuff you don't like later. SOME guys (not many) are actually looking at mods similar to yours for various reasons, so don't be too quick to undo them just yet.
 

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The gizmo you were pointing at is where the old front brake cable was anchored. It has been ground off the backing plate because it's no longer needed on the rear.

Mystery solved. Looks like he's grafted the right side spoke flange from the front to the left side of the rear hub. Tricky work because it has to be welded and indexed perfectly with the other side, but clever.

It's hard to see the quality of work with all the rust but if it was done right someone had some skills. You can see the welds best at around 00:25, then again from the outside at about 1:15.
 

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Mystery solved. Looks like he's grafted the right side spoke flange from the front to the left side of the rear hub. Tricky work because it has to be welded and indexed perfectly with the other side, but clever.
It is getting close to my bedtime and my eyes are blurry from watching that video, but I still have two questions:

1) I may be wrong, but it sure looks to me that there is one empty spoke hole for every two spokes on the sprocket side (as opposed to an elongated hole that is shared by two spokes like the non brake drum side of a stock TW front hub). Is this an optical illusion?

2) How did he get the grafted spoke flange onto the rear hub? He probably had to grind the old one off, but how did he get the new one on without splitting and rewelding it?

I am tired and going to bed now.
 

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Ok, you busted me again. What the heck other bike has a 36 hole wheel with STEEL spoke flanges? The skipped holes look a bit large to hold spokes, but like you say it's late...

What a lot of work. Danged impressive.
 
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