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I saw a terrific Ural gathering last summer in Rasar State Park, in beautiful WA State. It was really cool to chat with the Uralists, and learn about their unique machines. The bikes are somewhat more evolved than the Chinese CJ750, which is based on the same platform.
 

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A buddy near Lime Rock, Conn had the basic 1990's olive drab Ural/ sidecar combo. When it was running it was a real eye-catcher. Wasn't running when I visited so I never got a ride.:(
 

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Been there, done that. Had a Dnepr with a machinegun on the sidecar, and a 2002 patrol bought brand new.
A Ural is a project bike from the day it rolls away from the dealer. If you don't enjoy working on it , (a lot), don't buy one.
I hear the above statements all the time, mostly from people who have owned the older models find it hard to believe, but she has been extremely reliable. So has the five other Urals in our group.

"A Ural is a project bike from the day it rolls away from the dealer" Not so much on the newer bikes, yes you still wrench yourself, but in 48,000 abusive miles I have never been stranded anywhere, she always got me home. The only wrenching was either routine oil, brakes, valve adj. etc.. Other work that needed to be done was induced from sinking her in a river, road salt, mud holes, rocks, etc. human causes. If you maintain them they will just keep going and going.
There is a huge difference from pre-2009 to 2010, 2011 and newer bikes. Dnepr and Changs are a whole diff. animals.
 

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Flatfender Willys jeeps are like that, too. Bent folks like me love them, happily pull the requisite maintenance, and revel in the fact that you can fix anything anywhere with basic tools. Normal folks put a small block Chevy or Ford in it, still aren't happy, and end up selling it and buying a late model, throwaway piece of garbage.
 

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P1000798.JPG I grew up with a 42 ford flat fender. It is what I learned to drive with. Was the precursor to a rock crawler. It had no shocks and would crawl around the woods most anywhere. It would lug down to nothing with the 75hp hurricane engine. I do miss it and picked up a CJ7 a couple years ago and yes, I put a 350 chev in it. Hasn't been off the road, I am not into taking it out and bashing it.
 

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That's a nice CJ7. I have one too, that I have had for about 25 years. I also have 3 flatfender jeeps. Only one currently runs, though. I would like to put a little diesel engine in one of the others.
 

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That's a nice CJ7. I have one too, that I have had for about 25 years. I also have 3 flatfender jeeps. Only one currently runs, though. I would like to put a little diesel engine in one of the others.
Just a thought on the old flat-fender CJs. You might explore putting the Jeep 2.5 four with fuel injection in one...it would triple your power and be not much heavier. If you have the high-hood CJ3B, it should fit under there.

They ought to be plentiful - the Jeep community looked down on those, all the years it was used in XJs and Wranglers. Don't know why...I had a YJ with that four and it was plenty strong. More power than the 1970s AMC 304s and 360s...everything is relative, but you don't want to pull stumps with an old Willys-spec Jeep.

A great way to get more power and sweet running, while keeping it "All Jeep" - that 2.5 was the last engine designed by Jeep. And the most involved. The Go-Devil fours were pre-Jeep Willys engines. The Hurricane F-heads were just modded Go-Devils. The OHC Six was an overhead-cam mod on a Continental Engine Company design that Kaiser-Willys purchased the rights to. And the 1960s V-6 was Buick design, and the tooling sold back to Buick once AMC took over the operation.

Just a little trivia on that one. But I did like that four.
 
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