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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Sawed up a 18" dia. 7 1/2' long Maple log this morning. Ended up with some 1" boards and 5, 2" thick beauties that are hard to find locally. Need to think of a project to build.....when they are dry in a few years.


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Discussion Starter #4
Neat set-up. You pull the saw to the wood?
I've got a rope and pulley system that is run by a crank that pulls the saw through the log. If you look at the top pic, you can see the crank on the left side. Return is manual, roll saw to other end of track. I have an ATV winch that raises or lowers the saw for board thickness adjustment.
 

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I must admit. I'm quite jealous. I wanted to buy or build a saw mill a few years ago and decided it wasnt worth it for the small amount I would use it. You can make some pretty neat slabs with a little mill like that. Ill provide a few pics just for fun. I really like metal work and combining the two seems to be my thing.

slabs cut from a beam removed from a local warehouse built around 1900 you can see a table frame in the right back ground
Furniture by dolphaxel, on Flickr
I learned from a local builder about using epoxy to fill imperfections and make the surface smooth. I like the way knots look and I think the epoxy has a neat effect. So I ran the boards through the planer after milling and put masking tape on the bottom over the various holes. The epoxy will run all the way through.
Furniture by dolphaxel, on Flickr
once im done with the epoxy I remove the tape and finish sand the entire board. I like the way oils look so I just finish them with danish oil. I know these tops will suffer some abuse over the years, but I like the patina that creates. the knot in this photo is solid, yet you can see through it like glass.
Furniture by dolphaxel, on Flickr
here is a hall way table that I made am am fairly happy with. the steel work and powder coat came out pretty well.
Furniture by dolphaxel, on Flickr
coffee table and sofa table (5') from another set. the glass under shelf is unobtrusive and very useful
Furniture by dolphaxel, on Flickr
Furniture by dolphaxel, on Flickr

Im currently working on a couple more pieces and hope to make many more. That one beam has provided 5 pieces of furniture and I have some smaller pieces for future stuff. I also know where there are about 100 more of those beams so I better get to work!

I hope that walnut finds a great project that you can enjoy for years to come!
 

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Very very nice work. It's amazing how much talent is out there.

Maybe you should have gotten some of those planks and replaced Littletommy's floors..

My woodworking skill involves cutting the logs into 18" lengths and sending them into the stove. I did just finish a shed in which I'm going to setup a little wood carving bench. I'd like to try my hand at wood carving this winter.
 

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haha I wish he would have!! Do you know those clowns just finished late Sunday. After they left, I found out they broke my toilet which had to be replaced, but is still not working right due to another problem ( I am flushing it with a bucket of water from the tub) and then I found out I had no TV...they drilled two screws through the cable!!! Sheeeees :mad: But I like it, it's a whole lot better than the floor that was in this 100+ year old house.
Very very nice work. It's amazing how much talent is out there.

Maybe you should have gotten some of those planks and replaced Littletommy's floors..

My woodworking skill involves cutting the logs into 18" lengths and sending them into the stove. I did just finish a shed in which I'm going to setup a little wood carving bench. I'd like to try my hand at wood carving this winter.
 

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Beautiful pieces you have there, I am very jealous. How do you dry them? And if not, have you had any warping problems?

I have seen chainsaw mills that look pretty neat and I have thought about trying one out, they aren't too expensive either, a couple hundred bucks.

And I have seen the epoxy before and it's a great idea and works beautifully, what epoxy do you use? Did you have any problems with bubbles?
 

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This is an awesome thread. I love to see the work you guys do on your TW's and the other areas. Your skills are to be admired. I too have thought about the chainsaw mill thing. I have quite a few cedar trees that could be used to make some beautiful furniture. I, however, would not have the skill or patience to "gitterdone". I have a Stihl and Husqvarna saws, both about twenty inch bars. I sometimes think the bars might be a little too big for the power supplied. Kinda like a flea crawling up an elephant's leg with rape on his mind. lol Sorry ladies, that was just locker room talk.
 

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Back in the day I ran a 60in bar on my 2100 homelight for cutting cedar. I am down to a 32in now on my 066 stihl. I use it for the sawmill and when felling larger trees. When cutting lumber it is slow as the chain isn't made for ripping so much as crosscut. Even so by filing the teeth more straight across rather than an angle helps. Is a slow process though. Thought about putting an arbor on with a circular blade driven with a saw head, but I thing the chatter from a light system wouldn't work.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
,,does it say property of noa on the under side...lol
I think you meant "Noah", the fella in the Bible that built the ark.:D Actually, I built it about 3 yrs. ago. All that lumber for the saw carrier and the track system was from lumber they were throwing away at work, old shipping crates for machinery.. The 18hp B&S engine was from a lawn mower with a bad tranny that the neighbor gave me. The 29" bar and chain came from my old Homelite Super XL that gave up its life while bolted to an Alaskan Mill. Bought some pillow block bearings, pulleys, shafts, the steel that the motor and bar are mounted to, and other misc hardware. A lot of time but not a lot of $ invested. A bandsaw mill is faster and more efficient, but for sawing up 5 or 6 logs a year that I acquire, this set up is perfect. When I'm done with it for the year, I'll tear it down, store the track in the shed and the saw carriage in the garage.
 
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