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New 2010 TW200 owner. I am wanting to add additional lights, maybe driving or off-road lights and was wondering if I can add them without needing an additional voltage regulator. I am considering two 55 watt halogen type. Any info on this would be appreciated, thanks!
 

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Lot's have tried, many batteries have died.





http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/2103-h4-bulb-question-what-headlight-setup-do-you-have/





http://tw200forum.co...1/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...5/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...7/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...5/ShowPost.aspx





I saw these figure awhile back on the forum not sure if it was for the early or later models. Both have limited output.



19.5 watts or less at 1500 rpm

143 watts or more at 5000 rpm

260watts or less at 8000rpm





The wise Qwerty once said



"I've crunched the numbers for both new and old TWs. The secret to a healthy electrical system on a bike like the TW is to maintain the factory balance of charging system outlet vs. power draw. There is no regulator per se like on a car or truck. Generally speaking, such systems put out just a little more than the bike needs to run. Once the battery is charged there is just a bit of overload going into the battery that is disipated as heat.



On those TWs 2000 and older fit the new H4 headlight housing and a "bi-xenon" H4-to-HID conversion. It will probably be necessary to add a regulator and small second battery to provide enough voltage at idle to maintain the plasma arc of an HID at idle since the headlight runs directly off the stator on the early models. If the other lights are converted to LED either use resistors or add auxilary LEDs to match the total draw of the original bulbs. Failure to do so would likely result in an over-charged and ruined battery.



On the 2001 and newer there are two options. The first is to switch to a "bi-xenon" H4-to-HID and add 35 watts worth of incandescent auxilary lighting. Most incandescent clearance lights draw about 3 watts. The second option is to mount dual headlights that accept "bi-xenon" HID conversions and convert all other lights to LED of equal effective luminousity to the originals. There will still be enough watts for a few extra LED brake/stop/tail lights. With the 2nd option one headlight can be switched to provide an additional 35-40 watts for electronics or heated gear.



On "bi-xenon" HID conversions: Cheap HID conversions are HID on either high or low bean and conventional halogens on the other. It is impossible to maintain electrical balance when flipping the dimmer causes a 20-25 watt change in current draw, or more. Also, with some of these conversions it takes a second or two for the HID to put out light. Hit the dimmer, and the halogen dies a second or two before the HID makes light. Kind of scary in traffic at night. "Bi-xenon" HID conversions use a single HID plasma arc to generate light output and use a servo to change the position of the plasma arc to replicate the position of the two filaments in an H4 bulb. If you are going to do the H4 conversion bi-xenon is the way to go."
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Lot's have tried, many batteries have died.





http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/2103-h4-bulb-question-what-headlight-setup-do-you-have/





http://tw200forum.co...1/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...5/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...7/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...5/ShowPost.aspx





I saw these figure awhile back on the forum not sure if it was for the early or later models. Both have limited output.



19.5 watts or less at 1500 rpm

143 watts or more at 5000 rpm

260watts or less at 8000rpm





The wise Qwerty once said



"I've crunched the numbers for both new and old TWs. The secret to a healthy electrical system on a bike like the TW is to maintain the factory balance of charging system outlet vs. power draw. There is no regulator per se like on a car or truck. Generally speaking, such systems put out just a little more than the bike needs to run. Once the battery is charged there is just a bit of overload going into the battery that is disipated as heat.



On those TWs 2000 and older fit the new H4 headlight housing and a "bi-xenon" H4-to-HID conversion. It will probably be necessary to add a regulator and small second battery to provide enough voltage at idle to maintain the plasma arc of an HID at idle since the headlight runs directly off the stator on the early models. If the other lights are converted to LED either use resistors or add auxilary LEDs to match the total draw of the original bulbs. Failure to do so would likely result in an over-charged and ruined battery.



On the 2001 and newer there are two options. The first is to switch to a "bi-xenon" H4-to-HID and add 35 watts worth of incandescent auxilary lighting. Most incandescent clearance lights draw about 3 watts. The second option is to mount dual headlights that accept "bi-xenon" HID conversions and convert all other lights to LED of equal effective luminousity to the originals. There will still be enough watts for a few extra LED brake/stop/tail lights. With the 2nd option one headlight can be switched to provide an additional 35-40 watts for electronics or heated gear.



On "bi-xenon" HID conversions: Cheap HID conversions are HID on either high or low bean and conventional halogens on the other. It is impossible to maintain electrical balance when flipping the dimmer causes a 20-25 watt change in current draw, or more. Also, with some of these conversions it takes a second or two for the HID to put out light. Hit the dimmer, and the halogen dies a second or two before the HID makes light. Kind of scary in traffic at night. "Bi-xenon" HID conversions use a single HID plasma arc to generate light output and use a servo to change the position of the plasma arc to replicate the position of the two filaments in an H4 bulb. If you are going to do the H4 conversion bi-xenon is the way to go."
Appreciate all the info! Guess I'll keep what I've got!! Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Lot's have tried, many batteries have died.





http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/2103-h4-bulb-question-what-headlight-setup-do-you-have/





http://tw200forum.co...1/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...5/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...7/ShowPost.aspx





http://tw200forum.co...5/ShowPost.aspx





I saw these figure awhile back on the forum not sure if it was for the early or later models. Both have limited output.



19.5 watts or less at 1500 rpm

143 watts or more at 5000 rpm

260watts or less at 8000rpm





The wise Qwerty once said



"I've crunched the numbers for both new and old TWs. The secret to a healthy electrical system on a bike like the TW is to maintain the factory balance of charging system outlet vs. power draw. There is no regulator per se like on a car or truck. Generally speaking, such systems put out just a little more than the bike needs to run. Once the battery is charged there is just a bit of overload going into the battery that is disipated as heat.



On those TWs 2000 and older fit the new H4 headlight housing and a "bi-xenon" H4-to-HID conversion. It will probably be necessary to add a regulator and small second battery to provide enough voltage at idle to maintain the plasma arc of an HID at idle since the headlight runs directly off the stator on the early models. If the other lights are converted to LED either use resistors or add auxilary LEDs to match the total draw of the original bulbs. Failure to do so would likely result in an over-charged and ruined battery.



On the 2001 and newer there are two options. The first is to switch to a "bi-xenon" H4-to-HID and add 35 watts worth of incandescent auxilary lighting. Most incandescent clearance lights draw about 3 watts. The second option is to mount dual headlights that accept "bi-xenon" HID conversions and convert all other lights to LED of equal effective luminousity to the originals. There will still be enough watts for a few extra LED brake/stop/tail lights. With the 2nd option one headlight can be switched to provide an additional 35-40 watts for electronics or heated gear.



On "bi-xenon" HID conversions: Cheap HID conversions are HID on either high or low bean and conventional halogens on the other. It is impossible to maintain electrical balance when flipping the dimmer causes a 20-25 watt change in current draw, or more. Also, with some of these conversions it takes a second or two for the HID to put out light. Hit the dimmer, and the halogen dies a second or two before the HID makes light. Kind of scary in traffic at night. "Bi-xenon" HID conversions use a single HID plasma arc to generate light output and use a servo to change the position of the plasma arc to replicate the position of the two filaments in an H4 bulb. If you are going to do the H4 conversion bi-xenon is the way to go."
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info! Appreciate the assistance to all. Guess I'll keep what I've got!
 

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I'm assuming by your screen name you have military experience, which is the only reason I'm responding to your question. The Sylvania Silverstar Ultra H4 replacement provides a significantly better headlight than the stock H4 bulb, even though it is about the same current draw. I was pleasantly surprised when my dual H4 conversion was damaged and I re-installed the stock headlight with a SilverStar Ultra bulb. The improvement is well worth the $20 cost of the better bulb, and a very simple upgrade to do. Since the SilverStar ultra is not a high-power bulb, it will not overload the stock wiring circuit and will not have the short life of typical high-output halogens. Also, it is 100% legal, and the high-ouput bulbs will get you a ticket around here.
 

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Ok so no modification is needed to install the silverstar ultra H4 bulb? Thanks for any info
 

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Will it work on 87's?

looks like no, pre-2001 are 35w.

Key Features:


  • The whitest and brightest headlight currently available.
  • Up to 40% increased down-road visibility.
  • Increases side-road (peripheral) visibility by approximately 50%.
  • Up to 50% brighter light.
  • "Plug and play" orientation means that SilverStar Ultra bulbs can be installed as easily as standard halogen bulbs.
  • Includes 2 Sylvania 9003HB2/SU BP 12.8V, 60/55W SilverStar Ultra High Performance halogen headlights. (Also meets H4 requirements)
Sylvania 9003/HB2/H4 SU SilverStar Ultra Halogen Headlight Bulb (Low/High Beam), (Pack of 2) : Amazon.com : Automotive
 

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Will it work on 87's?
In case you missed it in small's linked thread, a PIAA 70473 Super Plasma GT-X HS1 Bulb is an easy, but not real inexpensive, improvement for a 35W replacement bulb. It's 5000K which makes it a little "whiter" than the stock bulb and it is noticeably brighter. Not blinding bright but definitely an easy improvement. I run one on my '95.

I really like small's Advmonster model 44's light output but they're a little pricey (prolly worth it) and we have to keep in mind the balance of the electrical system by cutting usage somewhere else. Someday....:rolleyes:
 

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10 watt 700 lumen cree T-6 KL6.6LM IP67 miner's headlamps with Li-ion battery packs for $70 on e-bay for off-road helmet mounting. 10 degree lens I think.
 

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I was comparing the 98 tw with the super plasma gtx and the 07 tw with the hid and leds. The hid is 35w once its up and running and I believe the leds are 20-22 watts a piece. . So I should only be about 20 watts over the stock setup when running the leds. I dont run them all the time.. just at night when theres no traffic or offroad. They are also dimmable so you can run them in traffic if they are dimmed down. I also run heated grips but not with the leds on.
 

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I was comparing the 98 tw with the super plasma gtx and the 07 tw with the hid and leds. The hid is 35w once its up and running and I believe the leds are 20-22 watts a piece. . So I should only be about 20 watts over the stock setup when running the leds. I dont run them all the time.. just at night when theres no traffic or offroad. They are also dimmable so you can run them in traffic if they are dimmed down. I also run heated grips but not with the leds on.
I didn't know for sure what the watts rating is on the HID's but was going to take an amp reading with a meter (giving me watts) and if it falls within the range I need for my '95, I'll use it there. I didn't see a power consumption rating in the paperwork.

I've cut 8 watts out by using LED tail and speedo lights... 29W if I count the brake element. So if I switch out the headlight I can safely go up to 40-43W. If I use LED's in the front running lights I save another 11 watts. Most of my night riding is on back roads and we have tons of deer that I want to see. I'm thinking about add-on spot lights for whichever bike I don't use the HID on.

Now if the weather would just warm up....I'm saving all my wood to heat the house instead of the shop.
 
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