TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am back.
We spent 3 weeks in Africa. The first 5 days were spent doing a van trip down to Sossusvlei Namibia to visit the sand dune and watch the total Lunar eclipse.
After that, we spent 14 days riding a BMW 1200 R GS through Namibia and Botswana with a van trip to Victoria Fall in Zimbabwe.
The trip also included a few safaris where we were in trucks and a few river cruises.

If anyone is interested in going to Africa, I highly recommend Renedian Adventures. We did the Wildlife and Waterfalls tour which was 99% pavement with a couple gravel roads and some sand.
Lorie - I was the only one in our group that was able to ride the bike through the sand standing on the pegs - enjoying riding sand has its benefits.

I will post some pictures later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
Yeah cuz I hear that Moab just sucks...:rolleyes: Couldn't keep a straight face typing that. Would it help if we painted a couple donkeys to look like zebra.
I went on an African adventure once. I don't think Somalia really captures all the essence and beauty the continent has to offer. Unless messin' your trousers is what you're after, then I give it 5 stars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Motorcycle pictures


Getting the bike and checking it out.


Some of the riders and bikes before we head out.


At a rest stop with support vehicle - All roadside rest areas have no toilets so we use the "bush" - ladies to the right ( you know as ladies are always right )


Another rest area, ladies used the rest room ($2 south african rand or around $0.20) Men just used the bush.


A view from the bike or AKA Linda's perspective


Maun - one of the places we stayed


Leaving a fueling station. The attendants were so happy to get a $10 Rand tip. It cost ~ $220 Rand when the bike had 1 bar left on the fuel gauge.


The last 2 riders. The last rider, Cliff, has a orange cover on his head lamp and drove most of the trip in the oncoming lane so that the lead rider new we were all accounted for. Cliff always joked that riding was the same as in Canada for him as he was always in the right lane while the rest of us were in the left lane - Purple you would have been at home on these roads.


The distance and average fuel consumption for the trip.

Top speed I hit on paved roads was 180 KMPH while passing some lorries (Linda was not with me at that time, but we did get up to 170 passing lorries, which she did not like) On a gravel road - no pinions allowed - I did get up to 140, but dropped backed to 110 as you never know when a Warthog might decide to cross the road.

Next set of pictures will be of some of the wildlife we saw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
More Random Pictures

Kris, we only spent 1 night in a tent; I will need to load those to share latter. We did not see any Lions, the cobras we saw were in an enclosure and the Giraffes, well we saw a fair number of them.


A nature walk with locals from a small village - We had an interpreter to translate.


A Kalahari Ferrari - that is what our guide, Mike, called them. They came in 1, 2 or 3 "donkey" power


Sun setting on one of our safaris


Guinea fowl


Water buck and Impala


Baboon - we saw lots of these along the roads


Africa's fast food - notice the M on the butt; AKA McDonalds - Impalas


A hippo still feeding in the morning. They spend their days in the water and their nights feeding on land.


Elephant having a drink - We saw hundreds of elephants


Painted dogs (endangered) we search for them for some time.


Linda on the putting green at Victoria Falls Hotel with one of the locals in the back ground - note: tail is down so it is relaxed


Part of Victoria Falls


Some entertainment at Victoria Falls Hotel


The shadow of us riding an African Elephant. These are rescued elephants from a draught that were taken in by locals and then released. They started to seek out humans for food so were moved to a reserve and were trained via a reward system to allow humans to ride them. 1/2 the fee to ride them goes to their upkeep.


Getting to feed and interact with the Elephant after our ride


Group Photo


Sunset from the deck of our "hut"


Bull Elephant on his way to a watering hole
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Cool trip. Thanks for sharing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Some more pictures - Linda did take over 1200.


Having a local treat - dried worm - tasted like wood


More treats in the "Singles" market in Windhoek - I did try some of the BBQ


Our Bush Camp - note wooden structure on the left under construction


That building under construction is to replace these - One scoop of sand when you have finish your business please.


Our tent for the night - The hyenas wondered through the camp during the night and the hippos were foraging on the outskirts of the camp.


The other tour vehicle in our Safari


Riding through a small town


Watch out for donkeys, cows, goats, horses and dogs along with the wild animals such as warthogs, elephants, giraffes and ostriches that want to cross the road.


A good stretch of highway in Botswana - the bad stretches had us down to 60 kmph and not only dodging potholes, but other cars dodging the potholes and then throw in animals on the side of the road - kept you on your toes.


Most of the roads are straight


Some gravel - Many of the rider were not comfortable on this.


In many rural areas the locals (especially the children) would run to the road waving. Many passing cars would also flash their light with excitement on seeing the motorcycles. We saw 2 other couples touring on motorcycles.


More Road


A curve in the road! We did hit a curvy section on our way home - but were stuck behind a lorry:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
GRAVEL ROADS!! Now there's something I am also very uncomfortable on. My anxiety level jumps way up on the curves, regardless of how much of a turn it is. The motorcycle tends to wander over towards the edge of the road (woods, ditch) and if I chop the throttle in fear, it makes it worse. I was told to "steer the bike with the rear wheel - ie throttle" but I have almost went down several times trying. I can't imagine what it's like on a big adventure bike with street tires!! My method is watch out, slow way down for the turn, and survive.

That country looks beautiful, and it's great you had the opportunity to see all that wildlife and a different way of living. Don't know if I could have eaten a dried worm. I swear it looks like you are holding something that came out a litter box LOL!. Sorry but that's just me LOL!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
The dried worms have to be better than the ones they give you still wigglin'. Those are quite unpleasant. Any bug still squishy is nasty, had to try a bunch of different ones in woodland survival school when I was in the Corps. Even today, when they ask at Subway if I want it toasted, instinctively YES!!!
Even at the Mariners game they run out of toasted crickets or grasshoppers or whatever it is before the 7IS. Still I go with the Ivar's chowder bread bowl instead.
Beautiful pictures. Thanks for sharing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
Wow, coastal BC and Haida Gwaii last year, and now an African adventure ride! Very cool. You and Linda are getting some quality miles under your tires. Thanks for the pics and stories. And add me to the jealous reader list! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
very, very cool!! Glad you were able to get over and had a great time. Thanks for posting and letting us experience it thru your pics and words!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
Very cool. What was the weather like? Cool that time of year?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Very cool. What was the weather like? Cool that time of year?
On the first day and on the second last day of riding I used the heated grips on the bike and had my wind breaker, but we were up early and in the southern part near Windhoek which is also at a higher elevation. As we travelled North (closer to the equator) it got warmer. Most days I started out with a motocross jersey under my vented jacket for the first hour of riding and then I took it off and wore a short sleeve shirt only under the jacket. I had brought my summer riding gear. We were in shorts and T-shirts during the day then long sleeves and pants at night or on some of the safaris. Two of the days were very warm (35 celsius) and I was soaking my T-shirt in water every time we stopped to keep cool. The swimming pools at all the resorts were very cold, but after a hot day of riding they felt refreshing. I would not want to be in this part of the world during their summer.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top