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At a random poster's recommendation from a while back, I decided to go ahead and grab the ~$30 stainless allen head engine bolt kit off ebay.

My case has some of the OEM phillips head screw-bolts stripping and I'd rather not have a repeat of that later if possible. I'm not much for the 'bling' as the kids call it, but my jeeps manage to grow enough rust to keep me busy: don't need the tdub adding to the piles on the garage floor. Stainless is a nice option.



Disclaimer: I'm in no way related to or vouching for "alloyboltz" on ebay or elsewhere, but I figured I'd toss some pictures of the kit as I got it. Looks like fairly nice quality stuff. I haven't installed a single one of the bolts yet, and can't verify that they fit or anything else yet.. I'm sure you'll all hear from me if they don't (and so will the vendor)






 

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That seems like a great deal. Let us know how they go in, I may spring for a set as well based on a good recommendation.
 

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I can give one opinion already: the "oil filter cover" set includes 2 bolts.. ours certainly has 3 bolts.



Now: what I don't know yet is if the stainless ones replace the two phillips heads, and the existing allen head stays. If your goal is to replace the original stripped screws with bolts, this is fine.. if your goal is shiny stuff, maybe some irritation to be found here.



I remember whomever posted about them before said that since it was a multi-purpose set, there would possibly be leftovers, as well. I don't argue with extra bolts unless they were in it when I took it apart. I have a few nice piles of them for later use!
 

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Jontow: I don't want to hijack your thread, but I ordered a stainless bolt kit from a different company off of ebay, also based on a member's recommendation here, and also in the $30 range. If you think it would be interesting to compare kits let me know, and I can post pics of the kit in this thread.
 

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I bought the alloyboltz kit via ebay and it works great for me. None have loosened and that was over a year ago. Make sure you use some anti-seize or locktite and don't over tighten. Correct, the kit only includes two screws for the oil filter cover, as the shoulder bolt is not included. The only discrepancy in the kit is the screws for the timing chain cover either are too long, or they don't come with the kit. I'm sure the long ones will work.









 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hijack away, I'm certainly interested in seeing the options. I've obviously bought mine already, but my brother has one with a bunch of phillips screws all over still, and I'm sure he'd like to know, too
Not to mention anyone else that finds themselves in this position...



Jontow: I don't want to hijack your thread, but I ordered a stainless bolt kit from a different company off of ebay, also based on a member's recommendation here, and also in the $30 range. If you think it would be interesting to compare kits let me know, and I can post pics of the kit in this thread.
 

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I'm definitely interested to in how the kits compare, it seems like a great low-cost upgrade. Just got a job offer so I might actually be buying things again.
 

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Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with the company described below. Okay, now that you know I am not a corporate shill...



I ordered a stainless engine bolt replacement kit from Stainless Cycle. They don't specifically list a TW200 kit on their main website, but they do list one via ebay, which right now is $28.12 with free shipping, which is a couple of dollars less than what I paid. (Just my luck, right?) Anyway, it appears that their prices vary a little bit, presumably based on the cost of the raw materials. Also, the shipping time from Stainless Cycle was not fast. My guess is that these "kits" are not pre-made and just sitting in bins, but rather are "built" to order which may mean slow shipping as they hunt down an odd bolt length or size.



BTW, my kit also only comes with two (2) bolts for the oil filter cover, a long bolt and a short bolt.



Here is how it comes:





And here is how it is broken down, 6 bags labeled A-F that correspond to engine areas:









Close up of bolt face and sides (Best I could get…):





Stainless Cycle recommends the use of Loctite Product Number LT-37230SP Anti-Seize Stick C5-A Silver Grade.



I have not installed mine yet, but as soon as I do will post photos and give my opinion on fit and finish.



Thanks again to Jontow for letting me add this product comparison to his thread.
 

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Just noticed that the Alloyboltz kit includes washers. The Stainless Cycle kit I ordered is bolts only, no washers were included.
 

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Be sure to use antiseize. I use Permatex Anti-Seize Lubricant. Otherwise the stainless steel "welds" itself to the aluminum casing and can become rather permanent. Its an electrolytic reaction between the two metals that creates a oxide, which in turn freezes the bolt in.
 

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Do you know what grade the ss bolts are? I attach a long post made by a local (South Africa) good bike mechanic. He is German but EXTREMELY opinionated & rather arrogant & his technical advice is sometimes plain WRONG but usually very good. I don't know about his technical specs on stainless. i do know that his technical specs for steel is 100% accurate (grade 12.9 & 8.8 etc.) Note that he says stainless never seizes in aluminum yet one of the packaging slips explicitly states that anti-seize should be used.



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Be careful with hardware store bolts! Very often they come from China or Italy (worse) and are cheap quality. Easy to recognize by the marking 4.6 or similar on the head.

4.6 means the bolt is made from an alloy consisting of 90% cardboard and 10% zinc which only looks like steel and is as soft as chocolate.





Decent automotive bolts should be at least of quality 8.8

Anything that is subjected to higher loads or even shockload like footpeg bracket bolts, handlebar risers & clamps are better chosen from high tensile qualities like 10.9 or even better 12.9



Do NOT use stainless steel bolts for anything that has not been stainless steel from the factory or anything that has to hold a lot. In general QUALITY SS is fine for engine covers (actually to prefer as they don't seize in aluminium), switches and bodywork.

Be very careful not to overtighten SS bolts. Although the nominal shear load of an A4-80 bolt is the same of an 8.8 the A4-80 is much more ductile and goes into plastic (permanent) deformatioon much earlier than the 8.8

Needless to say please only buy quality SS bolts at least A2-70 and use a torque wrench.



In steel bolts the first digit(s) indicate the shear load in N/mm^2 and the digit after the decimal point indicates the percentage of the shear load at which the bolt goes from elastic into plastic deformation.

Means a 12.9 breaks at 1200N/mm^2 and permanently stretches above 1080N/mm^2. An 8.8 breaks at 800N/mm^2 and stretches permanently above 640N/mm^2.

A stainless steel bolt gives two different values. A1 to A5 stands for the quality of the steel increasing from 1 to 5 with A2 (corrosion resistant in normal environments) and A4 (corrosion resiststant in acidic environments) being the commonly available qualities. Don't give a fart about "Sea water resistant", "Marine Grade", or "Surgical Steel".

The number gives the shear load. An A2-70 will snap at a tension of 700N/mm^2

Common qualities of SS bolts are A2-70 and A4-80

Stainless steel bolts don't give a value for the max. elastic load like the steel ones but it is typically as low as 50% of the tension where it snaps. Means an A2-70 which you used to replace a standard 8.8 starts to stretch permanently at about 350N/mm^2 whilst the OEM bolt would only stretch at more than 640N/mm^2



Most allen bolts (especially the high tensile steel ones) will only come in black and rust like s**t when exposed to moisture. Bring them to the next galvaniser and get them Cadmium plated.



Torx is a child of automated manufacture as they allow fully automated fitment with a much lower failure rate than allen or hex heads. That's why they are quite difficult to get from a fasteners shop unless you are willing to buy a truckload.

You sometimes hear the argument that Torx is superior to Allen and Hex due to lower pressure exerted onto the bolt by the tool. This is rubbish as a bolt head no matter what shape is way oversized and as long as you use decent tools and work professionally and as long as the head is not damaged. You will easily snap a bolt or strip the threads no matter what shape of head.

If you need to replace Torx ideally replace with Allen.
 

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Stainless Cycle states their bolts are Grade A-2.



"[W]hy not grade 5 or 8? Metric stainless is not graded in the same way. A-2 is similar to 18-8 and is somewhere between grade 5 and 8 in shear strength. A-2 stainless has a much higher tensile strength than other standard fasteners."
 

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I've ordered from StainlessCycle numerous times and always had very good service. In fact this last order I got to Texas in 3 days from them on regular shipping. Quite impressed. All of their hardware is quality too.
 
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