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Discussion Starter #1
My 2001 has 750 miles. OEM tires are in excellent shape, have never sat flat. The OEM tubes hold air great, never varying more than +/- 1lb over 3 months timeframe. But I've heard tubed tires can create catastrophic wipeouts at speed. And I have no idea if age (at 10 years) is a big deal. It's not trivial to change them out, so I'd take comments and especially appreciate real stories if it's happened to you. Do these things go BLAM! and flat in microseconds? Or do they let out air slowly?
 

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all I can say- thats 10 year old rubber.. Tire work is one of the few things I have a bike shop do. If I take in the rim and tire they charge less than $20 each to dismount, mount and balance...
 

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I've had plenty of blowouts. The tube types do go BLAM. It is very difficult to slow down/maneuver safely off of the road.
 

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First off I would like to say this a good and valid question, so why did someone give you a -1. It's a pet hate of mine, it just seems spiteful.



I would say if the tyres are not showing any signs of deteriation and you only ride on trails and slow quiet roads you could renew the tubes and keep your current tyres.

It's ultimately your decision but a blow out at speed will scare and probably hurt you.



I would not use 10 year old tubeless tyres.
 

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Having grown up on a farm where we kept over 100 tires inflated at any one time, driven junker cars with tires borrowed off the family sedan after they were balding, and driven everything from grain trucks to motorhomes, I'm no professional tire man, but I have had some experience. Cardinal rule among RVs (read heavy vehicles, high tire pressure, high speeds, and low mileage so tires accumulate age - note the last two characteristics could apply to motorcycles) always change a tire thats 6+ years of age no matter how good the side wall looks. Yes the tw is different in that pressures are lower, speeds are moderate and slow for some of us, but a two wheel vehicle is terribly unstable with only one inflated tire. I'll bet that most mc riders would say change an old set of tires for safety (unless you can't afford the tires). Most importantly if you see any checkering on sidewall change the tires. I had a 7 or 8 year old tire blow in a parking lot while driving 30 mph or so, but before I could get the vehicle (a 4x4) stopped the entire sidewall had disintegrated and what remained didn't resemble anything I would have wanted to ridden even for a short time at 70 mph. Old rubber deteriorates and gives way under normal conditions.

If you inflate your tires properly (maintain proper pressure and check often) you will have less chance of this happening, but old is old. Tires not subjected to UV age slower than those sunbaked tires.

I know lots of folks are running old rubber, but I don't want to have a blowout at highway speeds to save $300. I'd probably change them if I had the cash. Oh, BTW, my tires on my 2002 are ten years old and I guess I should follow my own advice. Just my preference. Tom
 

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I put on new tires & tubes when I got my '89 TW. The rear tire was the original one (21 years old) and had major weather checking around every lug on the tire. The tube may have been original and was somehow rusted/corroded to the wheel and tire at the bead area! The front tire had been replaced at some point and the tube was newer but had at least one patch in it.

It's definitely good peace of mind to spend the money on tires and tubes so you know their maintained and safe. And like it was said before, its not too expensive to just have them mounted and balanced in a tired shop...
 

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I'll hazard a guess the -1 was because he already asked the same tire question in the tech section.



http://tw200forum.co...h__1#entry21629



I myself change change tire, tube & rimstrip as a set. I'm going to try a bottle of rideon at my next tire change



http://www.ride-on.com/



I had a blowout on a Triumph Bonneville rear tire many moons ago. I let off the throttle and coasted safely to a stop. It was like riding with the back tire on smooth ice.
 

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I had a blowout on a front at 160mph on a roadrace bike. Not fun. Then there was the blowout on the rear of a CB750. Not fun. Learned my lesson--no old tires, replace tires, tubes, and rimstrips as sets, check air pressure weekly, inspect tires daily.



New tires sitting in a warehouse can dryrot on the inside from chemical reactions with components of smog, making the tire dangerous while still looking fine on the outside. I always check the date code on the sidewall to see how old a new tire really is. http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=11

I won't mount a tire over 3 years old, and won't keep a tire on a vehicle for over 3 years, no matter who good it looks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the comments - ultimately what this seems to come down to is "tires and tubes are cheap / broken bones not so". As always, I am appreciative. And Qwerty I don't know where you find the time guy - but kudos for the other help too.



Oh hey thanks for the negative rate for whatever reason. Stoked on that. And yeah - I posed a similar question about age a week ago and no one addressed it, Rich.
 

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it just all depends and how much you wanna push your luck. I bought my 2001 TW back in june '10, and it had 1950 miles with the original tires. I ran them on-road at speeds up to 60 mph until 8500 miles, no problems and the air pressure stayed consistent for the 10 months I ran them. I changed them out at 8500 miles because the front knobs were unevenly worn (probably from hard braking practice) and I wanted street tires so I got new tubes and some nice TW203/204's.



I'm not recommending to run old tires like this, I'm just stating that I was able to with no problems at all, just depends on what the environment the tire was in it's whole life, and just plain luck I suppose.
 

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Thanks to the thread and some pondering it provoked, I ordered a set of stockers from Motorcycle Superstore. $163 with free shipping. They were shipped the next day but have yet to see the vistas of NM. Ride safely - the rubber is the contact point between your butt and reality. Tom
 

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Thanks to the thread and some pondering it provoked, I ordered a set of stockers from Motorcycle Superstore. $163 with free shipping. They were shipped the next day but have yet to see the vistas of NM. Ride safely - the rubber is the contact point between your butt and reality. Tom
I just got mine from there too! I ordered tubes from them as well. Got the rim strips on the way from Yamaha at the moment... I have an original front tire, and a 2001 rear tire. Time to upgrade.
 

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I don't worry about folks willing to invest in their own safety. It's a habit of mind that keepd them well.
 

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10 years old!....change it all out....bands,tubes and tires!. You may not see anything on the outside,but, you definetly are not going to see anything that is going on in the inside of a tire!!!...change them.
 

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Just what kind of riding are you doing? Are you on Highway 17 or 1 a lot? I would change them. If you are only doing casual riding I would not. This just me and you do what makes you feel safe.

I have a 1993 Tw200 with original tires and only 1000 miles on them. The tires look very good. I do mostly casual riding about 35 to 45 miles per hour. I just had the Yamaha dealer look at them and he said for the riding I do I did not need to change them unless I wanted to.

I had a Honda Trail 90,1969 and the tires went over 20 years with only one time I had flat and it was at home.(Mostly use the Honda on hunting trips)

I am from northern Ca and I know your area somewhat. I know you will have fun on the TW. Now for the fun things. Do you like sea food? If you do my wife and I would fly in to Half Moon Bay airport and eat at Barbara's Fish Trap. That was always a fun day for us. Barbara's is next to the harbor.
 

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Front tire went flat while going 70 mph on my last bike (91’ XT350) but I only noticed a wobble when I took the exit for work from the interstate. The front tire on the bike was so narrow and the sidewalls were pretty thick and it never went completely flat. I thought it just had a slow leak and when I tried to put air in it I noticed a pretty big crack in the sidewall. I learned from that experience because the tire was also 8+ years old and apparently had begun to break down. I was just lucky it did not happen while ridding a larger bike with normal tires. Always keep good tires on everything now, even my bycicles.
 

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I'm going to try a bottle of rideon at my next tire change

http://www.ride-on.com/




I'll be putting this in my TW as well. I've already got it in all my other bikes. My wife and I rode the Continental Divide Trail a few years back, me on a DR650 and her on a DRZ400. There were 4 of us on the trip, and three if us used Ride-On TPS. The fourth got multiple flats throughout the trip. The other three got none. I was running a Kenda K270 rear tire with TPS, and when I got home that tire had 4500 miles on it, and at least 1,400 of those miles was 70mph+ highway speed in the heat, fully over-loaded, and non stop for three days. By the time I got home the tread was just more than half gone. TPS is a flat proofer, but also works well to lengthen tire life, keep the tires better balanced, and they don't lose air pressure over time.



Full Disclaimer - I work at a shop that sells TPS, but I'd be using it even if we didn't sell it.
 

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RideOn rocks! I was at a dualsport event and RideOn was a sponsor. About half the 125 bikes in attendance chose to partake of the free RideOn. After the ride, 6 people admitted to having flats. Only one had RideOn, but he didn't put the RideOn in until after he had the flat. RideOn stopped the leak and he rode the bike home after the ride with no further repair.



RideOn is water based and is easy to clean off a tire or tube if a more "permanent" repair is desired.



If you use RideOn, be sure to check your tires regularly for stuff stuck in them. RideOn can stop the leak, but if you let the object stay in the tire it will wallow out the hole to the point nothing can stop the leak, not even a patch.
 
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