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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody know if there are aluminum wheel rims available for TDubs andif anyone has made that switch?
I'm telling ya, those steel truck rims we have are heav-y!
Yesterday was the first time I've had the wheels off my bike...damn!
I had a dealer mount them with my new Dunlop K180 "Flat Track" tires and I could have gotten a hernia putting those in the truck.
It would be a miracle to find aluminum rears but possibly a front. What a difference it would make.
I haven't checked with any of the wheel suppliers, thought I'd check & see if anybody had done this.

I'll have a ride report on the K180s soon. Initial impression is "A-". 80% street or improved road, 20% trail...just what I need.
 

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Anybody know if there are aluminum wheel rims available for TDubs andif anyone has made that switch?
I'm telling ya, those steel truck rims we have are heav-y!
Yesterday was the first time I've had the wheels off my bike...damn!
I had a dealer mount them with my new Dunlop K180 "Flat Track" tires and I could have gotten a hernia putting those in the truck.
It would be a miracle to find aluminum rears but possibly a front. What a difference it would make.
I haven't checked with any of the wheel suppliers, thought I'd check & see if anybody had done this.

I'll have a ride report on the K180s soon. Initial impression is "A-". 80% street or improved road, 20% trail...just what I need.
Your front rim is already aluminum, only the rear rim is steel.

Due to the unusual spoke count of the TW's rear rim, there are only two options for finding an aluminum rear rim that I am aware of. One would be a custom drilled rim to match the TW's spoke count. The other is that someone on this forum reported that there is a KTM rim with the proper spoke count that could be laced to the TW's rear hub. Sorry, but I don't know what model KTM that it was.
 

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Work backwards from tire diameter that works for you, then decide what tire you really want back there, required rim width for that tire, then start looking for undrilled rims, then custom spoke lengths likely, and a custom wheel build.

It's not impossible, it's just going to take some time and money. It would be nice to go to a Tubliss system on the rear tire (You can on the front already), for the benefit of extremely low off road pressures. It makes a HUGE difference in comfort and hookup on climbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the ideas boys!
Am really glad to hear the front is already aluminum. Just assumed it was "cast iron" like the rear.
Wonder how many of our few little HP that monster rotating mass uses up, just getting across the intersection?
 

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Aluminum trailer wheel mod has been researched and is a feasible if somewhat pricey way to save some weight.
Sealing the spokes to go tubeless is another proven way to save a few pounds of rotating unsprung mass.
Then again by the time one goes with the heavy hub, trailer wheel and ATV tire the benefit of shedding a few pounds seems questionable. Why not go with, rather than fight, the strengths available and maximize the rotational inertia benefits of that giant steel and rubber gyroscope spinning back there? After all the OEM rear wheel/tire physics goes out the window as soon as a taller, wider, heavier ATV tire gets spooned on.
Embrace that added rotational momentum...sure it takes more time to spin up but once spun up it really demonstrates ol' Charlie Newton's First Law of Motion that a body in motion tends to stay in motion until acted upon by an outside force. This means that while you may not be able to loft that front tire over a log you may well be just pushed over it by sufficient forward momentum imparted by that rubbery rear gyroscope.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
So you're suggesting the brakes will be (more) useless ?

:rolleyes:
Uh...no.
Actually, the brakes would be better!
The poor brakes (front & rear) would not have to work as hard as now, not having to slow down that big, heavy rear wheel/flywheel.
Then they would be free to better slow down or stop the forward momentum of the motorcycle...better brakes!
And the poor little motor would have a little more (available) TQ and not struggle so much to accelerate the bike...quicker/faster!
Or...you could drop a coupla teeth or so from the rear sprocket for a little more top end & easier cruising effort, while keeping the same acceleration as stock. A little easier on the motor...fewer RPM for any given speed. A bit better MPG.
And less wheel weight means less work for the poor shock without all that rear wheel scrap-iron bangin' up & down back there...better suspension & handling! A smoother ride.
And easier to pick up the bike when it falls over!

A win/win/win/win situation...except for the cost!

Two old Racer Axioms that apply:
"If it breaks, make it stronger. If it doesn't break, make it lighter."
And, "Speed costs money...how fast do you want to go?"

It's too bad folks think all that "race-stuff" is only for racin'!
:rolleyes:

PS - Speaking of brakes...Yesterday I got my first ride with the new EBC "Double H" pads.
Imagine a TW that will stop when and where you want to - need to - have to!
HOOCHIE MAMA!
 

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:confused:
Or...you could add a coupla teeth or so to the rear sprocket for a little more top end & easier cruising effort, while keeping the same acceleration as stock. A little easier on the motor...fewer RPM for any given speed. A bit better MPG.
And less work for the poor shock without all that rear wheel scrap-iron bangin' up & down back there...better suspension & handling! A smoother ride.
And easier to pick up the bike when it falls over!
Adding "a coupla teeth or so" to the rear sprocket will actually have the opposite effect. I can't see how that affects the suspension and handling.:confused:
 

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Less unsprung weight is always a sporty improvement for handling, suspension has to work less hard.
That is unless you want a steam-roller like gyroscope pushing you in back like me.:p

Thanks for the sintered made in 'merica brake pad referral. Reviews say: "Stops on a dime" . pads.jpg
 
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