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Discussion Starter #1
Scientists in Papua New Guinea have discovered a new Viscoplastic mineral compound that has amazing uprightness retention properties. This substance is capable of easily holding your motorcycle securely no matter how hard gravity (or you) tries to move it.







Actually we did manage to get her back out with the help of a half a dozen locals.



My friend asked me if I posed this shot, and the answer to that was no. This was totally a product of over optimism, and not giving it enough gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
the brake lever doesn't look like that in real life, it is just foreshortened in the picture.
 

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I hope you didn't get your boots dirty, or lose one in that muck.

What were you thinking when you rode in there? I guess you had no idea how deep that was, you could have been gone forever.

Glad you got it out OK.
 

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I've stuck Tdub like that a couple times. I usually just shut it off and take a break to allow the engine to cool a few minutes, then crank her up, give her 15 seconds to build oil pressure, 2nd gear, wide open and dumped the clutch to get the rear tire spinning enough to sling the mud out of the knobs, then jumped on the pegs, yanked hard, and held weight back as far as possible on the seat, and she came right out. Every time. No pushing involved.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've stuck Tdub like that a couple times. I usually just shut it off and take a break to allow the engine to cool a few minutes, then crank her up, give her 15 seconds to build oil pressure, 2nd gear, wide open and dumped the clutch to get the rear tire spinning enough to sling the mud out of the knobs, then jumped on the pegs, yanked hard, and held weight back as far as possible on the seat, and she came right out. Every time. No pushing involved.


I will have to try that next time, as I am sure there will be a next time.
 

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I think the keys are to spin the tire fast enough to sling the mud out of the tread AND keep the weight back so the front tire planes across the top of the mud.
 

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I've stuck Tdub like that a couple times. I usually just shut it off and take a break to allow the engine to cool a few minutes, then crank her up, give her 15 seconds to build oil pressure, 2nd gear, wide open and dumped the clutch to get the rear tire spinning enough to sling the mud out of the knobs, then jumped on the pegs, yanked hard, and held weight back as far as possible on the seat, and she came right out. Every time. No pushing involved.




Absolutly worthless without pics..........



Bag
 

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After sinking several of my bikes in Southern Maryland clay I learned a trick. Find a log or strong tree branch.Lift the front wheel up and place the branch under the skid plate. Then using it as a fulcrum lever the rear wheel out of the mud and slide the bike to a better place to get going again. This trick helped me finish several Hare Scrambles that left other riders stuck in the woods.
 

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After sinking several of my bikes in Southern Maryland clay I learned a trick. Find a log or strong tree branch.Lift the front wheel up and place the branch under the skid plate. Then using it as a fulcrum lever the rear wheel out of the mud and slide the bike to a better place to get going again. This trick helped me finish several Hare Scrambles that left other riders stuck in the woods.




I've done that to a KLR on a dualsport ride in Arkansas. 3-4 650 riders yanking on a KLR, and it won't budge. Walk up with a 2-foot X 1-foot chunk of wood and drop it by the rear wheel. Come back a few minutes later with an 8-foot chunk of wood, and lift the bike up with 2 fingers to the point others had to jump to catch it before it fell. Levers are great.
 
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