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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a 1998 TW200 last December with plans to modify it Japanese-style for the street. There have been some really nice builds documented here, such as Catamount's Build, Fleshwound135's Build, Francois' TW125, Boret's Build, so, you get the idea.



This is my first motorcycle rebuild, and based on some of the work demonstrated above and by others such as ZombieStomper and Grant, I have a lot to live up to. I doubt my build breaks any new ground, as I freely admit that many of the ideas and solutions to problems were blatantly copied from the builds documented above or "reverse engineered" through photographs from builds from Japan.



It is said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so here we go.



This is how she looked when I brought her home:













I promptly began stripping off the plastics and getting down to the bare frame.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am not going to remount any plastic pieces, so I removed all the plastic mounting tabs on the frame. I decided to run a low header and muffler, so I removed the muffler mounting brackets. I have no desire to ride the TW 2-up so I pulled the passenger foot rests and removed all but one passenger foot rest bracket. (The right bottom passenger foot rest bracket will be used to mount the low exhaust hanger.)



I agonized over cutting on the frame. It is hard to bring yourself to do it, as there is no going back. Plus, I am a complete newb at this stuff. Eventually I girded my loins and got to it.



I have no pictures of me actually cutting, grinding and sanding the tabs and brackets off the frame, but it may prove useful to describe the tools I used. For cutting I used your standard 4-1/2 inch angle grinder with metal cut off wheels. I found that the DeWalt branded wheels lasted twice as long as the Harbor Freight Chicago branded wheels. I made all of my cuts very conservatively leaving a good bit to grind or sand down to the frame. I mainly utilized 120-grit flap wheel sanding discs on the angle grinder for the sanding. These flap wheels can also be used on edge as a cutter for fine control cutting.



In certain areas on the frame the tubing angles do not permit the angle grinder access. A Dremel tool will fit, but I found that their sanding discs and wheels just wear out too fast and their costs quickly add up. So in those areas I hand sanded with 80-grit sandpaper then smoothed with 120-grit by hand. Hand sanding the frame will work up a sweat, but the results are very satisfying when you look at the frame and can't tell a bracket or tab was ever there.



A note on safety. I wore a eye protection when cutting, grinding and sanding along with a 3M N95 & Organic Vapor Cartridge Respirator.



Here is the end result:



















That left only two plastic mounting tabs left to cut and sand. On the gas tank. I just measured, marked, cut conservatively and sanded. Only I used a Random Orbit sander with 120-grit paper to sand and smooth the tabs off the tank.



Here's the tank:





 

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Discussion Starter #6
At the same time that I was cutting and sanding the frame, I was also ordering parts and practically living on this forum (and many others) trying to decide in which direction I wanted to go on numerous things.



For instance, I have over 350 bookmarks related to TW200 posts from all over the web. I have also compiled a Word document that is 9 pages, single space, full of what I have dubbed 'TW Tips'. Basically I just pulled the key quotes or nuggets of information from tons of threads and compiled then in a Word document. This stuff gets addictive, fast.



Anyway, a big part of the Japanese-style custom is the extended swingarm. I documented here my failed attempt at extending it myself.



That led me to figuring out how I was going to import an extended swingarm (and a couple other goodies) from Japan which I documented here.



I plan to add photos of each of the parts/modifications (where applicable) when I get to the point of actually installing them on the bike and will include the part numbers then in case you like these parts too.



At present, I received the frame, swingarm, and other bits back from the powdercoater yesterday. Everything is still shrink wrapped, but as I get going soon I will post photos of the powdercoated parts and the progress as it proceeds.
 

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In Japan its called Naked or tracker style. I lived in japan for 31 years and just moved to the states last month. I will tell you now I can help you through it and save you alot of money. First of all you don't have to order stuff from japan period if you want to save money. All can be done locally at a local machine shop for cheap and it will be done faster than you get your stuff if you ordered. If the machine shop started the day you gave it to them it could be done by the next day. I can help you with relocation of your electrical(including battery and headlight),muffler,gas tank,bars and swingarm.
 

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I will be anxiously watching this thread for updates! Keep up the good work.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Coming soon. Tourist season keeps me busy on the job. It handles a bit different than the TW...



 

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In Japan its called Naked or tracker style. I lived in japan for 31 years and just moved to the states last month. I will tell you now I can help you through it and save you alot of money. First of all you don't have to order stuff from japan period if you want to save money. All can be done locally at a local machine shop for cheap and it will be done faster than you get your stuff if you ordered. If the machine shop started the day you gave it to them it could be done by the next day. I can help you with relocation of your electrical(including battery and headlight),muffler,gas tank,bars and swingarm.
Hi

I'm sorry but I disagree, you can save money buying parts that are already made except if you own your own workshop of course.

There's also a bunch of used parts sold on Yahoo auctions and you can get them for very cheap prices, some will need to be repainted but it will remain less expensive than asking somebody to make your own part on demand

the other problem is that many parts are impossible to find out of Japan (Kijima FRP fenders for example) you could made them by yourself but it would be more expensive

This project seems to be very interesting, please keep us informed


cheers
 

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Hi

I'm sorry but I disagree, you can save money buying parts that are already made except if you own your own workshop of course.

There's also a bunch of used parts sold on Yahoo auctions and you can get them for very cheap prices, some will need to be repainted but it will remain less expensive than asking somebody to make your own part on demand

the other problem is that many parts are impossible to find out of Japan (Kijima FRP fenders for example) you could made them by yourself but it would be more expensive

This project seems to be very interesting, please keep us informed


cheers
Ding Ding Ding wrong again. Unlike you and me everyone else does not have access to JAPAN Yahoo auction. Second unlike Japan there are a abundance of machine shops in the U.S. that do things for cheap also its also rather cheaper to get tools and welders in the U.S. I already found a couple of places that make FPR fenders for cheap. You could also just get a fender from Drag Specialties and cut it or go on ebay for one to cut that is steel. Only if you wanted something specifically from a Japanese company is where you run into problems. 79yen to the dollar and ridiculous Japanese shipping also puts things into my favor of having it made locally.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The engine was of course very dirty from years of trail riding by the PO. Parts of the engine looked as if they had never been washed. I spent a good deal of time washing and degreasing the engine, employing several old toothbrushes for the job as well.



I agonized over whether to repaint the entire engine or not. In the end I decided the stock grey would actually look good with my color scheme and that most of the existing scratches and nicks on the engine are where my feet do the riding, braking and shifting.



But the jug was a different story. It was in need of a makeover. Here we see the jug masked and ready for paint:







I used 3M 400 grit sandpaper to rough up all the surfaces. I then cleaned the sanded surfaces with wax and grease remover. The jug was then primed with Dupli-Color Engine Enamel with Ceramic (DE1612 Primer Grey). The primer was applied in two very light misting coats followed by one wet coat, with ten minutes between coats. Here is the primed jug:







I used Dupli-Color Engine Enamel with Ceramic (DE1635 Semi-Gloss Black) for the jug. Again, two light mist coats followed by one wet coat, with ten minutes between coats. Here is the results:



 

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+1 on the Duplicolor Ceramic. Best engine paint I've found. My entire engine was painted with it when I built the bike, still looks like new, including the barrels. I use the 500F variety.



Mine is unprimed. I'm not sure it's necessary but I "cure" the paint by allowing it to dry overnight, then running the bike at idle for 15 minutes, allowing it to cool for an hour, then repeating a few times. I keep the first few rides short, mostly local errands until I no longer smell the paint after riding it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I like the Dupli-Color too, and am glad to hear that you are having great long term results with it. I also primed and painted my kick-arm and shift lever. I used the 500F stuff too. I have been told the primer isn't necessary (my brother has restored his 1929 Model T Truck without it), but I decided for a belt and suspenders approach.



The cans don't call for a heat cure, but the VHT product (also made by Dupli-Color) does. As you can see my engine is frame free so a heat cure is not possible right now. Your advice is well taken, though, and I should probably run a few idle cycles as you describe once it meets the frame again.



This stuff is easy to spray and I really like the nozzle on the cans. The directions say to spray in temps under 92F AND under 60% humidity. That doesn't happen here until late October! I had no issues spraying in my garage with outside temps near 100F and above 95% humidity.



Finding this product has been hard though. I have found it only at local Advance Auto Parts stores. My local AutoZone only stocks the Rustoleum engine paint.
 
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