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Im planing on adding some rear baggage and something to the front so I can go on some overhights in the Cascades. Has anyone done the front fork and rear shock upgrades you can get from Pro-Cycle?

They offer 20-40% stiffer front forks and stiffer rear shock based on your carrying weight. Looks like some good stuff to me, but Im a newbie. Also the few times Ive ridden a dub the front end did DIVE
pretty easily during breaking. I wondered about that.


Tom
 

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Welcome. I'm close to 250 lbs. and put the stiffest springs on front and back from procycle. Some say putting the front fork emulators are better than just the bigger spring but I have no experience with that. For me, the springs are better than stock but this is very subjective according to your use and riding style. For me, the TW does ride more rigid or stiffer but I don't get the bouncy bouncy pogo rear end bounce I got with the stock rear spring (as much).

Here is the procycle spring (left) versus the stock spring and spacer (right).


Here is the stock rear spring (yellow) compared to the stiffer red spring. (Note: My TW is a 2015 and I've heard the newer TW's, 2017/2018? maybe have a different style rear shock).



Red stiffer spring installed on the shock with a DIY spring compressor. Extreme caution should be used when using any DIY spring compressor. I've never had a problem but some people lose a finger, toe, or other body parts just walking across the street so I thought I'd better include the caution statement. :D

 

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Im planing on adding some rear baggage and something to the front so I can go on some overhights in the Cascades. Has anyone done the front fork and rear shock upgrades you can get from Pro-Cycle?

They offer 20-40% stiffer front forks and stiffer rear shock based on your carrying weight. Looks like some good stuff to me, but Im a newbie. Also the few times Ive ridden a dub the front end did DIVE
pretty easily during breaking. I wondered about that.


Tom
Your fork springs are preloaded... Added washers just over an inch stack, Took the dive when braking out of it anyway.
Tom P
 

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i'm 190+/- lbs and i went with the .6kg/mm front springs and the 15kg/mm rear spring and been happy with that. not like i ride motocross, but i beat it harder than just gravel roads and known to hit a jump or two and it made a big difference.

mine's a '94 but i replaced the rear shock with a 2001+ reinforced one
 

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How big of a pain was it to do the front springs?
not much pof a big deal... i did it with tw-brian's excellent service garage.

1. suspend or lift up the front end to remove weight.
2. remove end caps from fork tubes. (careful they still have some tension)
3. remove the old springs and spacers.
4. put in new springs.
5. reverse steps 2 and 1.

you can check and change the fork oil too depending on what you know about the current level.

(brian did i forget anything?)
 

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Easy to do a JB just stated. I would recommend changing out the oil. I did, the bike (a 2015) had about 5,000 miles - mostly dirt rides. Th oil was getting darker and had sediment on bottom of forks that took a few flushes to get out. Still pretty easy - just raise front end, take off the speedometer insert, pull front bolt, take off tire, loosen the fork clamps and remove forks, take out springs, dump oil from top of forks, flush with fresh oil, add (I think) it was 8 oz fresh oil, put in new springs and put together. Good to go!

I'll be doing all the above soon except replacing oil and springs - need to pull forks to put new fork books on. My boots are starting to split - using clear silicone right now to keep gunk out.

Any suggestions for good quality boots anyone?
 

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not much of a big deal... i did it with tw-brian's excellent service garage.

1. suspend or lift up the front end to remove weight.
2. remove end caps from fork tubes. (careful they still have some tension)
3. remove the old springs and spacers.
4. put in new springs.
5. reverse steps 2 and 1.

you can check and change the fork oil too depending on what you know about the current level.

(brian did i forget anything?)
That just about covers it, Joe!

Here's a thread that shows the internals of the forks, nothing scary is inside there.

https://www.tw200forum.com/forum/technical-help/18353-tw-forks-de-mystified.html
 

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I have used Daystar fork boots.

If I recall correctly, the bottoms are a little large so it helps to just trim off the bottom ends of your stockers and leave them in place to take up some of the slop.
Just ordered a pair from Amazon - here Tuesday. Perfect day because its a cold rainy day, good for shop stuff. Thanks for the suggestion/info Brian!. They got very good reviews from many bikes - 2 were from TWs.
 

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If your picky, you can also look over the recent years and see if a particular color is available from Yamaha. For instance, 4CS-23191-20-00 is for the black boots. They run more than the Daystars but the fit will be perfect.

I went with the heavy springs front and rear. Though I'm only ~155lbs I don't feel like they are absurdly stiff, and of course they are great for two up/luggage. Handling was greatly improved on and off road.
 

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My OEM fork boots cracked and failed within two years. Replacement Daystars are lasting over a dozen years.
If changing springs I would invest another hour to be proactive... pull & flush forks then install new Daystar boots with fresh oil set to proper level. Too much oil blows out seals, too little oil and no rebound dampening occurs. Tw's often come from factory with inadequate volumes of fork oil installed. This likely contributes to the reports of poor fork performance.
 

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My OEM fork boots cracked and failed within two years. Replacement Daystars are lasting over a dozen years.
If changing springs I would invest another hour to be proactive... pull & flush forks then install new Daystar boots with fresh oil set to proper level. Too much oil blows out seals, too little oil and no rebound dampening occurs. Tw's often come from factory with inadequate volumes of fork oil installed. This likely contributes to the reports of poor fork performance.
Yup! One of the first things I did with my new 2017 was to fill my fork oil to the recommended 130 mm from top. From the factory it was about 5mm low. Made a definite difference in the pre load and just a more secure feel.
 
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