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I am planning a vacation to the park and bringing my dog. She is Brittany and constantly on the hunt for mice, chipmunks and any other vermin that live in ground holes. We will be there the first week of March and I have some concern about snakes and scorpions with her stuffing her snout down every hole. I need to know if I need to be all that concerned in early March and what you all do with your dogs who do the same. She won't bother with a snake above ground but has never been around rattlers/scorpions that might be down a hole.

Would a bite in the snout from either kill the dog? Is there precautions I should take other than leashing her 24/7?

Thanks

GaryL
 

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I'm no expert but the most rattlers I've ever encountered were on a hillock just NW of Big Bend park boundary. Now this was height of summer in 110 degree heat and I foolishly was seeking shade and shelter along a limestone shelf after a long hike. One buzz was followed by another and soon I seemed to be sharing the blocky outcrop with dozens of them. They would certainly have attracted a curious dog. Marfa might be the closest vet which might be too far.
The amount of venom injected varies quite a bit on snake age and mood at the time with the older snakes husbanding their venom supply a bit more in defensive situations. They need that to secure meals.
Big Bend scorpions I have no experience with.
If you take your dog I would try to keep her leashed or supervised as much as practical.
 

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Gonna depend on the temps if they are out and about, but yes, there are boatloads of snakes there, including rattlers for sure!!
 

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Diamond back rattler VS dog, Well, You will be very sad,
I would not worry about scorpions as their sting is like a wasp and my dog has run into plenty of bee stings in the schnozzle but I would ask you vet about a sting remedy,
The diamond back rattlers can get pretty big and pump a good amount of venom swiftly, A 5 to 6' can dump a couple ounces into you in one swift bite,
Ide ve very concerned about them in that area as its so far south the rattlers will be active all rear round,
So,
Please be careful,
Ide keep my beloved beagle on a leash there for sure,
 

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I know that dogs can survive bites from Various snakes but I think that a Rattler would be too much for a dog, especially a smaller one. Some vets will sell you the shots (at least one here did for us because we couldn't afford an office visit) when Jake got Bit. Not sure what kind got him though, prolly a Copperhead. You might check with your vet and see if they could/would do something similar for you that way if the situation arises, you will be prepared
 

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I have no idea about rattle snakes. I would say make sure your dog avoids them. I have always had more issues with copperheads or water moccasins in my area. My brother lives near Austin and they have dog training to teach the dogs to leave them alone, they have some rattlesnakes around there. I have never been to Big Bend. I am more accustomed to the piney woods.
 

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National parks are not particularly pet friendly. Go to the Big Bend website and under "info" there is a section on their pet policy. (Couldn't post a link as this is my first post)

I visited two years ago in January, in the park my dog is either in the rv, car or on leash.

There is a rattlesnake vaccine that your vet can give prior to your trip.
 

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Snake aversion classes for your dog supposedly have a high success rate; the instructors basically terrify your dog with real and/or simulated snakes. Graduates then want nothing to do with snakes.

Indeed National parks are not pet friendly. Canyonland's Needles District actually will deny access at times to those with dogs supposedly due to concerns of heat stress. This happened to me once so dogs and I legally camped and romped off-leash perhaps 3 miles away on BLM land. Same temperature, same environment, same risks but just a different jurisdiction.
Not sure if Big Bend will permit you to leave a pet un-attended in a vehicle while you go riding. I would suggest calling the Park for clarification on dog rules and risks before doing extensive planning to take your four footed companion. If they have prohibitions perhaps they can recommend a boarding facility.
 

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Critters we encountered last March at Big "Not in South Texas" Bend....included Coyotes, Road Runners, and senile Old Farts in RVs.....now we know that there are Snakes of all kinds, and biting critters, but with lows expected in the 30s and highs usually in the 70s {give or take 10 degrees} we had Zero problems....but if we run into BIG Critters this time around I have instructed Montezuma to kill em, and add them to our Campfire Chili...:D
 

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Snake aversion classes for your dog supposedly have a high success rate; the instructors basically terrify your dog with real and/or simulated snakes. Graduates then want nothing to do with snakes.

Indeed National parks are not pet friendly. Canyonland's Needles District actually will deny access at times to those with dogs supposedly due to concerns of heat stress. This happened to me once so dogs and I legally camped and romped off-leash perhaps 3 miles away on BLM land. Same temperature, same environment, same risks but just a different jurisdiction.
Not sure if Big Bend will permit you to leave a pet un-attended in a vehicle while you go riding. I would suggest calling the Park for clarification on dog rules and risks before doing extensive planning to take your four footed companion. If they have prohibitions perhaps they can recommend a boarding facility.

Gary will be taking his Dog "Riding" with him...no TW for him, he is driving the "Rescue" 4 Runner to help out if Montezuma, Hoot, or Paul, crash and need carted back to civilization ... :eek:
 

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I am planning a vacation to the park and bringing my dog. She is Brittany and constantly on the hunt for mice, chipmunks and any other vermin that live in ground holes. We will be there the first week of March and I have some concern about snakes and scorpions with her stuffing her snout down every hole. I need to know if I need to be all that concerned in early March and what you all do with your dogs who do the same. She won't bother with a snake above ground but has never been around rattlers/scorpions that might be down a hole.

Would a bite in the snout from either kill the dog? Is there precautions I should take other than leashing her 24/7?

Thanks

GaryL

Here is the scoop on Dogs and other Pets in Big "Not in South Texas" Bend National Park: Since your pal will be with you at all times you will not have a problem since she will go where your vehicle can go....

https://www.nps.gov/bibe/planyourvisit/pets.htm
 

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I'd be more worried about these guys making a meal of little Muffy.....



These are at Castolon Campground in Big Bend

 

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I just spent the day with Mississippi Larry we did about 60 miles of dirt and 60 miles of asphalt in my new Tundra. I showed him my desert camping spot I have been going to for 20 years and had a nice lunch. Now on scorpions do not come out in daytime and snakes will be stretched out getting sun in the day bring some antihistamine allergy medicine so if the dog gets stung.
 

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I'd be more worried about these guys making a meal of little Muffy.....



These are at Castolon Campground in Big Bend

We were hoping to see some of these last March and some Bear, if lucky a Panther...but aside from a few Coyotes, these guys played host to us at Montezuma and my site, and snacked on our chips and water....:rolleyes:

Big Bend Motorcycle Run 2016 062.JPG
 
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Hoot, it was the water in the campground that was bringing them out. There was a drought that year and all the wildlife was very stressed. They closed the hiking trails in the Chisos Mtns because of cat attacks...and they had to put one down that was too aggressive. I think a water supply line had broken and part of the campground was flooded as you can see in the picture.
 
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