TW200 Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
With 7K miles on the TW it's time for a new front tire. I think I am going to try the Bridgestone TW302. I probably ride more than 99% on the street, but I don't want strictly street tires. To me this tire is kind of similar to the stock TW34 rear with larger knobs that are somewhat staggered. I'm hoping it won't howl as much as the TW31. Also as best as I can tell this tire is not heavy like the Kenda K270 or IRC GP-1. Has anyone here tried this tire on the front?



Bridgestone TW302 Trail Wing Dual Sport Rear Tire



I've never changed a motorcycle tire myself but since I'm doing all the maintenance I want to try it. Searching the forum people have made some general comments about tire irons, mostly that they like the old ones they've used for years. I am wondering if you experienced folks could give me specific recommendations on the different types I see on the Motorcycle Superstore website.



Is this a good way to get started?



Motion Pro Assorted Tire Iron Set



In the reviews, people complain that these tend to damage the wheels and mine are the black ones. They also say the smallest one is not very useful, but I am thinking about modifying it to hook onto a spoke like qwerty described.



Or would these be better?



Motion Pro Spoon Tire Iron



The reviewers mention these are less likely to damage the wheels or pinch the tubes. 3 of them would cost more than the above set, and they would all be the same size.



So what do you guys think? Are there other options I should be looking at? I hope you guys don't think these are dumb questions because I have zero experience with this.



Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
If you are not going to carry them with you, I prefer the longer, heavier tire irons.



Seems like I have collected a few over the years.







I use three and prefer the spoon ends.



On my bikes that have fancy cast wheels, I use rim protectors under the tire irons.







jb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,223 Posts
Motion Pro Spoon Tire Iron



The reviewers mention these are less likely to damage the wheels or pinch the tubes. 3 of them would cost more than the above set, and they would all be the same size.



So what do you guys think? Are there other options I should be looking at? I hope you guys don't think these are dumb questions because I have zero experience with this.



Mark

[/quote]





I have these and I love them. It takes some muscle to put on the back tire, but its doable. The rounded (spoon) end is awesome and even though I've pinched my tube, I have yet to cut one. I bought three and they have paid for themselves already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
i used two cheap red handled tire irons a few weeks ago to swap out my stock tires with the 203/204's.



they are like these:







it was a piece of cake. i had both tires off and the new ones on in about an hour to an hour and a half. the front one was really easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
JC whitney has some tire tools. Low price. I got a bead breaker from them also. Front tire balancing is important. I mounted my Fat Shinko 428's front and back then I had the front balanced after riding it about 100 miles-was needed. Usually new tires have a yellow mark on the side wall to indicate location of valve stem when mounted it should line up to. Never hurts to ride it first to see if you need a balance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
Not to thread jack, but do you have to get the wheels balanced once you get the new tires installed?
Yes, since I have a tire balancer. Some people don't and have no problems.



IMO, if you are going to travel at highway speeds, and not slow trail riding, it's a good idea to balance the tires.



I use one like this:



http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/productDetail.do?navType=type&webTypeId=168&navTitle=Dirt+Bike+Parts&webCatId=19&keyword=wheel+balancer&prodFamilyId=26856



A similar one from Harbor Freight at a lower price:



http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-balancing-stand-98488.html



jb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,345 Posts
Being a complete NOVICE...if that. I had my tires changed at the local shop. They scratched up the front rim because they used tire irons carelessly. One of the forum members said that he uses little squares from milk containers to use as a shield/guard on the rim to protect the rim from the irons.



Keep it simple stupid...KISS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
Being a complete NOVICE...if that. I had my tires changed at the local shop. They scratched up the front rim because they used tire irons carelessly. One of the forum members said that he uses little squares from milk containers to use as a shield/guard on the rim to protect the rim from the irons.



Keep it simple stupid...KISS


lol Brock, I just go ahead and scratch the heck out of my rims on the first tire change. After that it doesn't matter any more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
The first set you have listed work best in my opinion. They have a little bend in the end that really grabs the bead and keeps it from slipping off like regular spoons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I haven't changed tires on the TW yet but I have changed them on a number of other bikes. I've changed just enough to know that the particular irons don't matter as much as these 2 very important things: HEAT and LUBE (ha, that sounds a little dirty!)



Seriously, if I lay the tire in the sun for an hour or so or even stuff it in the dryer for about 10 minutes the lubed tire slips on without too much fuss. Admittedly, I have more experience with tubeless street bike tires, but I would use the same method for TW tubed tires. If all else fails, go to ADVrider or Youtube and look up how some guys are changing their tires using big zip ties or ratchet straps. It looks like a slick way to do it if someone didn't want to fool with tire irons.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top