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Discussion Starter #1
The TW and the DT share the same gas cap.
The one on the TW is tight, I struggle to get it off and my Daughter, well some time she can and some times she can't get the cap off.
The DT seal broke, but still worked, but at Admiral's it broke again and did not work anymore.
Yamaha only wants to sell you a whole new gas cap at a ridicules price - Seal not sold separately.

So, I have not researched if a heavy duty inner tube is gas/petrol resistant (maybe someone here knows), but I did see I could buy 12" X 12" fuel resistant rubber sheets ranging from $6 to $20+ CND depending on thickness.

Anyway I found some old inner tubes and cut myself 2 new gaskets from one of the heavy duty ones. The TW gas cap now goes on much easier and I did a splish splash test and saw no fuel come out. I need to wait and see if it works on the DT as my gas cap is in Idaho - Another camp fire story.


Kindergarden, if only I had gone... I could have probably done a better job tracing




1 of 2 gaskets/seals made.

Has anybody else had to deal with a failed gas cap gasket? and what did you do?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Well
(Isobutylene-isoprene copolymer) rubber is predominately used for inner tubes of pneumatic tires and in vacuum and high pressure applications. It has excellent resistance to weathering, oxygen, heat and ozone. ... This rubber has excellent resistance to uv / ozone and most chemicals, but has poor fuel resistance.
 

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On my ’98 (old style larger gas cap), getting it off was always a two handed job, but sometimes getting it back on to release the key was nigh on impossible. I learned to lick my thumb, and run it over the rubber seal – works a treat

I often wonder if that was why they reduced the size of the gas cap on later models ….
 

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A spritz of aerosol silicone on the rubber gasket (homemade or store-bought) will really help reduce gasket-against-metal friction .
It will eliminate friction and galling...better seal and longer life.

Spray silicone is useful in many places on our bikes...anti-friction & weather protection for most all "soft" areas, like wiring, rubber, electrical connections, tire sidewalls (NOT tread) and most everywhere you can't see.
Never on any brake system pads/drums/calipers, etc.
Or seating surfaces!

It will also make a passable "polish/protectant" for paint, plastics, etc.
Even a temporary "lube" for chains & sprockets...in a pinch!
Clean & shine the outside of your helmet with it...but not the visor or interior.

Spray it on your brother...
 
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