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So it seems like I am doing 50% off road and 50% on road with my tw. I need new tires bad ! Should I stick with the bridgestone rear tire or get a atv tire? benefits of a atv tire? drawback?
my gearing is 14/47 so I can rip a bit faster on the highway and I am A lightish guy 170 lbs so ya any thoughts.

There was a dude that was from Squamish/ Vancouver maybe that was in ripping in my town (rossland BC) that had a tire from a Polaris ATV that what he said. It was sweet kinda a taller looking tw34. he had a stock swingarm, i just don't what the tire was.

I need a new front tire also thinking of a shinko 244 5.10

any way your all knowing input would be sweet!
this is was a sample of riding I did yesterday also
IMG_1951.jpg
 

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That looks like ATV tire territory to me :).

I am running a 26x8x14 Duro Power Grip on the rear and love it. Drawbacks are that it can be dangerous to get mounted and is probably impossible to remove and remount in the field. I have myself convinced that it has such a stiff sidewall that I should be to limp home even with a complete loss of air - although I have never actually tried to do this.

For that type of terrain I would not feel comfortable with a 47 tooth rear sprocket. I am currently running a dual rear sprocket setup with 47 and 55 tooth sprockets and have a 65 tooth sprocket that I plan to install as soon as I get a longer chain.

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I run a Maxxis Ceros, 26x9x14. It's not as aggressive or big as the Bighorn, Terracross, or Power Grip. I look at the Ceros as a compromise between the Bighorn, Terracross, or Power Grip and the stock tire. I like the rounded profile when it is mounted on the TW rim. It's enough bigger and more aggressive than the stock tire that it does make a difference. My experience is mostly in sand. The only thing that concerns me about my Ceros, is the consequences of a flat out on the trail. I carry Slime and an air compressor with me, but there is little chance I could make a trailside repair. It hasn't been a problem in over 6,000 miles of mostly dirt, though. Like Brian, I feel the sidewalls are stiff enough I could limp back to civilization if necessary.

The upside: Better flotation and traction in mud and sand. It's like having a winch on your 4x4, you don't often need it, but when you do you really need it. On my recent attempt to reach the mail drop I rode a few miles through deep sand. I never had a problem with traction, just with steering and trying to stay upright. When I rode the White Rim Trail last year there were a few steep places where the soil was like flour. I was glad to have the old Ceros. ATV tires also look cool, and based on my experience I believe will outlast the stock tire.

The downside: Difficulty and hazards of mounting the tire. No chance of a trailside flat repair. The larger diameter, if you choose to go that way, will make your gearing higher. The larger diameter can also affect the steering geometry. The heavier tire will absorb some of your power. Also, the more popular ATV tires that are being run on the TW are not DOT approved. That may or may not be a concern depending on the laws of your state. There are more DOT approved ATV tires available now than when the ATV tire mod became popular, though.

I think it really depends on the kind of riding you do. Do you often find yourself struggling through mud or deep sand? If so, I think you would be happy with an ATV tire. If most of your riding is on paved or dirt roads you would probably be just as happy with the stock tire.

There's a lot of good reading on the subject. Here's the sticky about ATV tires in the Performance and Customization forum, if you haven't seen it already. More good reading, if you're so inclined.
 

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Alot of stock atv tires off of side by sides are softer and rounder and easier to mount, though less aggressive traction wise. Really anything is better than the stock tw tire. It will make a noticeable difference on nearly any terrain. In the next few weeks im going to fab up a 12 inch rear hub rim combo that will alleviate alot of the mounting issues.
 

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I have a duro mounted up on one of mine and if traction is what you need it will deliver the goods. Is your terrain mostly hard packed and rocky or is there soft dirt and mud mixed in too? The reason i ask is the duro really shines in the mud and slippery goop. I personally prefer the stock tw34 aired down for anything hard packed/rocky. I have a rim for each so its an easy swap when i want to.
My duro didn't go on too bad. I documented it in this forum, a bead trim and some "intimate" lubricant got it on there pretty drama free

With an ATV tire a 47 tooth is not going to work very well. The tire is taller and heavier so you will need more gear. I run a 55t on my wheel with the duro and gearing wise it feels similar to the stock tire w a 50t.

the Shinko 244 is a good proven choice for the front a lot of us here run that same tire and like it, myself included. I run that on both of my tw's
 

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I figured it out once with the gearing calculator, but it's been awhile now. As I remember the larger tire size combined with a 55t sprocket put me back pretty close to stock gearing, which is a good compromise in my opinion.
 

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I run a Duro w/ 13 & 55 tooth sprockets. my riding buddy has stock tire and gearing. We ride mostly hardpack, rocks and sandy soils together, he also puts on a lot of slab miles.While I love the looks and machismo of the ATV tire I must honestly say only two or three times has my ATV tire made a big difference. For my riding style and location it is a toss-up; like the looks, miss the fuel milage. Traction is great but wider tire wants to eat my muffler. A law enforcement officer may not think it is as cool as I do. The greater tire weight and associated rotational momentum give a big flywheel effect; harder to accelerate but harder to stall. That additional momentum really helps on technical trail riding making bike more likely to pop over obstacle rather than stall
 

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I am currently running a dual rear sprocket setup with 47 and 55 tooth sprockets and have a 65 tooth sprocket that I plan to install as soon as I get a longer chain.

View attachment 7308
Dual sprockets!? Do tell..?
Do you just simply slap on two sprockets? Is there a spacer, or any extra hardware?
Im also basically looking for the 'ultimate' tire for central Oregon off-road riding... (light-medium sandy/dirt mixture, snow, lava rock, etc.)
(Its also got to fit on the stock rim/frame..)
 

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+1 on the Duro Powergrip with 55t rear sprocked and o-ring chain. I would do it again in a heartbeat! I was one of the early adopters and have no regrets. Also consider a Shinko 241 trials tire for the front... also a big, big improvement.
 
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That looks like ATV tire territory to me :).

I am running a 26x8x14 Duro Power Grip on the rear and love it. Drawbacks are that it can be dangerous to get mounted and is probably impossible to remove and remount in the field. I have myself convinced that it has such a stiff sidewall that I should be to limp home even with a complete loss of air - although I have never actually tried to do this.

For that type of terrain I would not feel comfortable with a 47 tooth rear sprocket. I am currently running a dual rear sprocket setup with 47 and 55 tooth sprockets and have a 65 tooth sprocket that I plan to install as soon as I get a longer chain.

View attachment 7308
Does a 26x8x14 simply mount n the stock rim, and fit without any mod's to be done?
Thanks,
Johann
 

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The Duro usually requires a little bead trimming in order to mount up, A little research here using the "search" feature shall reveal many older posts that will likely answer all your questions in greater detail than I could possibly repeat.
 

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The Duro usually requires a little bead trimming in order to mount up, A little research here using the "search" feature shall reveal many older posts that will likely answer all your questions in greater detail than I could possibly repeat.
+1... When i did my duro i didnt need to mod the bike in any way to get it to clear. The only trick is you need to move the adjusters to #5 or 6 to get it to clear on the front so you may need a longer chain.
 
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