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I posted these for MHM. I can't be trusted to narrate them but if he doesn't do it fairly immediately feel free to add your own captions
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We always have alot of those at our county fair. I like checking them out along with vintage spark plugs, tractors and such.
 

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First, thank you Russ for posting my picks, they look great!!



Every September we here in the Boont region put on the "Mendocino County Apple Fair", and yes, there are many apples, & other delights!



I belong to a group called the Kimmies of the Codgy Mosh (Boys of the old machines) and every year at fair time we drag out our old and dusty equipment, take a bath, and then we gather up a selected group of old machines & dust them off & give them a bath too! We have various tractors, stationary power equipment, a 1920 Mac Flat-bed truck, a nice selection of old chain saws, and some other curious old hand tools, and even a few gopher traps that operated by inserting a .38 cal. blank shell into the contraption, & then inserting it into the gopher hole... Apparently they were effective! Anyway, on to the pictures.



The big green thing you see there is a 1920 Fairbanks Morise six hoarse power hit-or-miss type engine, with a wide belt powering a pump-jack, & water squirting out of an old pitcher pump borrowed from my wife's garden art collection. Most "Bright-Lighters" don't have a clue as to how a pitcher pump actually works, but when they see water running out of the blue thing, it helps draw attention to the other things we have on display. It has really helped in that way. (I just stuck it on there two days before the fair opened, to the semi-objections & snickers of a few of the club members, but now they all love it!!)



The magneto on the 1920 F.M. has been the bane of my existence for about the last six years, so last year I really got brave & ripped it all apart. After some tricky repairs & stuffing a pair of the nearest to value capacitors I had in it, I was able to make it run OK for about a day before the capacitors fried, & no more go. This year I did the same thing, with the correct capacitor, put a couple of extra metal blocks around the magnet when I zapped it with the magnetizer, and now it throws a 1/4" bolt" That's the best anyone there has ever seen it go! And it's been running like a top for the whole fair now. WHEW!!



The codgy Kimmie in the pictures is our director Frank, & the Apple in the pictures is the first gal that they actually let join our group, her name is Jill, She's great! I'm glad the codgy's finally dropped their sex est attitudes, but that's another story I don't want to go into here. Let's just say things are MUCH better now, & I hope we get more members because of it!



I'm off to the Fair now, last day today, & I'm going to treat myself to a BIG piece of the best apple pie you've ever had, excluding mom's of course! Have a bahl dee ya'll!!
m.
 

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I have always been intrigued with those big-ol-engines. I realize the displacement of the engine is likely a lot, but then the rpm seems really low. When listening to them run, it almost seems like they fire randomly. I suspect this is not the case. Guess my question is, how's the fuel consumption? Lots of momentum, low r.p.m. then again, many CC's.



Apart from the bulk of the cast Iron, were/are these reasonably efficient machines or can we get a 160 pound Honda 12hp motor to do the same work on a lot less fuel? Kind-of curious. Thanks, Gerry
 

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That's cool. Love that old equipment. Looks like some interesting stuff on the board behind the pitcher pump, too. Thanks guys!
 

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OK, sorry this took so long, but a little more info from what I've experienced with these engines.



They are generally referred to as "Hit-or-Miss" engines, that's why they sound like they are running or "Hitting" un-evenly. There are many variations on the theme, but generally the way it works is the engine "Hits" when the rpm's drop & more power is required. When the governor reads the correct high range of the rpm's, usually between 400-to-450 rpm's, the governor activates a rod that holds the exhaust valve open, and allows the engine to free-wheel, or "Miss". When the rpm's drop to the low end of the set range, the governor disengages the rod holding the exhaust valve open, and allows the engine to run as a 4-cycle, the rod now actuating as an exhaust push rod on the exhaust stroke. There is no push-rod / rocker arm actuating the intake valve, the valve has a light spring that allows the low pressure in the cylinder on the intake stroke to pull it open & allow for the intake of air-fuel mixture via the mixing valve. (A somewhat crude type of carburettor.)



These are large displacement, low compression engines, running at low rpm's. Under a load such as the pump in the pictures, the engine will balance out & pretty much hit every time, therefor running as a large 4-cycle stationary engine / power plant. All manner of contraptions were & could be run off of these engines, & they came in many sizes.



The economy of this type of engine was that it could run off of very inexpensive fuel, as a matter of fact the engine in the pictures has a carb that is a dual-fuel carb, this allowed the engine to be started with a hot fuel such as gasoline, ect. & then switched over to kerosene, or other motor fuel once the engine was warmed up. These engines could run off of all kinds of fuels, and did, if you can think of it, someone most likely was using it to run their engine, and that kept it affordable, as well as having a long service life.



We have lots of old tools, chain saws, drag saws, and a running 1920 Mac Truck in our collection, tractors too, other stuff I'm forgetting, etc.



A wee deek on codgy mosh's!! m.
 
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