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Discussion Starter #1
I have some knowledge of maintaining batteries from a previous job but want to confirm since I read so much contradiction online regarding motorcycle batteries.

My motor wouldn't start and after charging and trying it again the battery metered at 10v so I checked the water levels and they range from dried enough to not see water (small holes don't want to tip it over too far), to flush with the plates. In my experience you fill with distilled water to the top of the plates (not too much or you reduce potency) and then charge it. But popular mechanics say to fill it to the spout of the chamber and others say to the minimal line marked on the side of the cell and not to over fill it...both seem inaccurate to me so I wanted to confirm with those more experienced.

Also in other batteries once the levels started to drop the battery was on a decline and would need to be replaced in less then 6 month...what's your prognosis?
 

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You seem to know more than most about these things !

Fill to just above the top of the plates. Overfilling a little won't really hurt or help. Charge it and see what the voltage is. If battery more than 5 years old prepare to get a new one in the near future.

That's my story..
 

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Almost all lithium here.

When I have to deal with a wet cell, I cover the plates with distilled water and trickle charge it for 24 hrs. No more than 750 milliamps.

If it comes back to life, I consider myself lucky and never trust that battery again.
 

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I have some knowledge of maintaining batteries from a previous job but want to confirm since I read so much contradiction online regarding motorcycle batteries.

My motor wouldn't start and after charging and trying it again the battery metered at 10v so I checked the water levels and they range from dried enough to not see water (small holes don't want to tip it over too far), to flush with the plates. In my experience you fill with distilled water to the top of the plates (not too much or you reduce potency) and then charge it. But popular mechanics say to fill it to the spout of the chamber and others say to the minimal line marked on the side of the cell and not to over fill it...both seem inaccurate to me so I wanted to confirm with those more experienced.

Also in other batteries once the levels started to drop the battery was on a decline and would need to be replaced in less then 6 month...what's your prognosis?
Before you spend too much time on your old battery test each cell inside the battery with a multimeter. Fill each cell with enough distilled water to cover each plate then trickle charge the battery overnight. Let the battery stand for an hour or so then remove the fill caps. Set your meter to DC and place the black lead from your meter to the - terminal on your battery then insert the red lead into each cell chamber and make contact with the plate. You should read 3 volts or higher "assuming you have 4 cells". If all cells are working properly then your battery should be salvageable for another season. Hope this helps.



Tom
 

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I have worked with dry batteries that have been on the shelf since the 70's (oddball sizes needed for correct judging, where the bike needs to start), batteries taken off of my "pile-o-batteries" to test circuits, lights or run my Honda diagnostic equipment.

Not really dependent on age, but more related to the amount of care the battery received during its life. It is a crapshoot as to whether you can revive one.

If this is your only bike, and you need to rely on it, why not change the battery? In some bikes (I am not that familiar with the TW's charging system), having a weak or failing battery can cause issues (more expensive issues, ie Murphy's Law) with other portions of the electrical system.

I know I sound like a broken record, but Battery Tender batteries have all but removed a large part of maintaining my bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Before you spend too much time on your old battery test each cell inside the battery with a multimeter. Fill each cell with enough distilled water to cover each cell then trickle charge the battery overnight. Let the battery stand for an hour or so then remove the fill caps. Set your meter to DC and place the black lead from your meter to the - terminal on your battery then insert the red lead into each cell chamber and make contact with the plate. You should read 3 volts or higher "assuming you have 4 cells". If all cells are working properly then your battery should be salvageable for another season. Hope this helps.




Tom

That is great advice Tom. It has 6 chambers I believe. Stock battery 2015.
 

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Depends.

1. If the kill switch turns off everything or just the ignition.

2. If the ignition switch has positive shutoff.

3. Where the drain is on the system.

I've been toying with a battery cutoff switch for the negative wire.



Awesome...I'll follow up with the results.

Another battery question...could using the kill switch reduce system drain from your battery when idle?
 

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On both of my bikes I hooked up a 2 prong pigtail connector to the battery. I hooked the other half of the pigtail connector to my 1.5 amp automatic trickle charger. Occasionally I just plug the trickle charger up and let it charge. It keeps the batteries topped up and ready to go with no seat removal. Also a light coat of Vaseline keeps the terminals from corroding.
 
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