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Speaking of Batteries

I had offhand asked on my "Still Alive..." thread about the WPS Featherweight Lithium Battery. Does anybody own one? Are they worth the cost? Amazon has them for about $100 and my wife keeps bugging me about what I want for Christmas? "Really Nothing" has been my stock answer, but that's not flying....so instead of asking for 2 bottles of Drambuie and a Cigar International Gift Card {which would be great} I'm wondering if I should just show her this....I've already got her a nice .357 lightweight snub nose handgun....so I don't want her to feel cheated on buying me a gift:rolleyes:
 

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Well,
Here's my take on this, for whatever it's worth. Take a stock, standard TW with no electrical add-ons and, just EXACTLY what, in wattage or amperage, is needed to run and supply all standard features on it, on a regular running basis? That is, in amperage or wattage, what does it take to actually run the engine? Then, what dose it take to actually run the low beam of the headlight? Now, I have no idea what those demands are but, let's just say for the sake of argument, it takes say, oh, about 3 amps to run the engine and power up the headlight. Again, just throwing out numbers. Now, if that stator is putting out, ANYTHING above that 3 amps, at say medium operating RPMs, then the battery *SHOULD* be receiving at least SOME form of charging, correct? I mean, it sure seems that Yamaha would ensure that, it's little T-dub can be self supporting for any and all riding conditions, both higher and lower operating RPMs, correct?

As with any and all electrically started engines for the past 100 years, it takes a bit of juice out of the battery, to start the engine. Once the engine is running, the generator or, alternator or, in our case, the stator, is now working to put back, what energy was used, to start the engine. I have no idea just how long, our stators take to replenish the battery, to a *topped off state* after the bike was started and, with just the engine running and, say cruising at oh, maybe 30-45 mph for oh, maybe say, 10-20 minutes, using the low beam as the standard day-time runner. I'm speaking from experience here. I put a brand new lead-acid battery (Yuasa something or other) in my '07 a few months ago when I bought the bike. It's been working flawlessly. I have no electrical add-ons. It's completely stock. If I start the bike in the morning, it may take a few cranks 'cause it's cold and it's a carbureted bike. Fuel injected bikes like my Goldwing, start before the engine turns over one full revolution. Anyway, once it's warmed up a bit, I'm off and riding.

If I ride for say, about 15-20 minutes, then shut it down for a few minutes while I take a break for some reason, when it comes to start it again, that little dub motor spins like I've got a 24v battery. It fires right up. So, this is my thoughts here. The Dubs charging system is appropriate for the most part. I have no clue about AGM batteries or, the "feather light ones" but, if there's any difference in their requirements for charging, once they've started even a little dub engine, then maybe the dubs charging system has a hard time with those demands, heck, I don't know, just guessing.
Scott
 

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I haven’t used the WPS battery but have used other Li-po and agm’s and I recently had one fail in the weirdest way. While riding in the middle of no where, I hit the starter and got nada. Trail trouble shooting show’s 12volts but won’t even tickle the starter relay. I kick started it and got back to camp.
Using a meter I show 12vdc but won’t carry a load and running it was throwing a charge. I checked the regulator and battery temps. Then continued to ride the rest of the day.
This was really stupid after reading about lithium batts. going Chernobyl it could have gone really bad.
I have 4 of these batteries and really like them, my favorite feature is their long term storage ability, I used to keep these on battery tenders. Now just drain the carbs and Park them w/out worries about charge levels and discharge rates.
 

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My 2000 bike with the kickstarter will run without a battery connected to it, so it's hard to see how low rpms can run down a battery.
My bike ran fine and the headlight low beam was on too, when I rode 6 miles home with a disconnected battery that I discovered when I got home. I took a short trip to the store, the bike was dead when I went to start it to ride home, then I used the kickstarter, it started right up and I rode home. Once home I took the seat off and found the neg. cable had disconnected from the battery. Once reconnecting it, all was back to normal.
You do not need the battery to run and ride the bike. I never tried it at really slow rpms but it idled just fine and that's about as low as the rpms get.
I may be wrong but I would still bet the problem is with the battery, not the bike or the charging system.
Just put a voltmeter across the battery terminals and see what it reads at rest, then see what you get starting it (how low it drops), and see what you get at idle and at varying rpms. And get the battery load tested as that's the only way to see if it's any good. Any battery place or parts store will do that for free, because they want to sell you another one.
 

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Willys714 - A fully charged battery will read 12.6-12.8V. 12V is a battery which is only about 45% charged and may not have enough amps to start your bike. Get it tested or get a new one, and charge it before you use it.
 

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Thanks for posting the discharge chart, I use the same one for my camper batts.
The TW battery was toast, even though it metered 12 +vdc off and 13+ running, very normal. I have no way of load testing a battery with a multimeter but It would carry the neutral light till you stabbed the starter and then go flat, then come right back with 12+. Normally with bad batts. I can see dead cells with a voltage drop but these agm’s are different.
The battery was fairly new and gave no hint of failing, Just quit w/out warning.
After reading about Lithium batteries internally shorting, I’m glad my t-dub didn’t light up like a vape pen.
Oh, and I too am really glad to find out the t-dub does not need a battery to get home
 

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Lithium batteries should be OK, they have over charge protection these days. This was not always the case in the past, but things have improved significantly in recent years

Looking on the bright side, if one does start to head back to China, all you have to do is to stop the bike while the battery is going off like a firework between your legs, remove two bolts under the seat, then remove the fuel tank - couldn't be easier .....
 

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Willys714 - That's what I said way back in post #17, that your battery was the problem. Just make sure you fully charge up the new AGM battery before you use it. You can get a really good AGM for less than 1/3-1/2 the cost of a lithium and be just as happy with it.
 

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So basically any at speed there is plenty of current to put charge into the battery. The regular chargers for this size battery put out 1.5-2.0 A and the "tenders" or "maintainers" put out ~0.75 A.
 

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I put an undersized AGM battery in mine and never had another issue with batteries. I bought about 3 Yuasas in my bike. Added acid, charged as stated exactly and none would last over about 6 months. I would then kick start for years before replacement. I bought an AGM which weighs about 1 pound or so, really light and it is rated less than the stock yuasa battery on amps. I have been pushing the button for over 2 years now with no issue. The name and type of battery is under a past post somewhere. That battery also was cheaper than the Yuasa that I had ever bought.
 

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YTZ7S Scorpion 12v 130 CCA AGM ATV & Motorcycle Battery
YTZ7S Scorpion 12v 130 CCA AGM ATV & Motorcycle BatteryLength: 4 7/16
Width: 2 3/4
Height: 4 1/8
Weight: 5.2
Shipping Weight (lb.): 6
DC Output Voltage: 12 V
relatedproduct1: 327,749
$43.95
Part # sYTZ7S

This one shows 6 lbs there is another showing 4.6 lbs. I know mine is way lighter than stock. The battery is smaller so you have to put spacers around it to fill the void. Someone else used a small canister, put tools in it to fill the space. I need to do that, a wise use of space. This is off of the BatteryStuff.com web site.
 
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