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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

What is the best break in oil to use?

And when should I switch to synthetic?


Thanks

-Alexander
 

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Any regular dino oil but change frequently when new
I do
50, 150, 500, 1500 with cheapo Walmart Oil

It is often said NOT to go to synthetic until 2500

In the TW I Use real synthetic either Redline, Amzoil. Motul either ester or PAO as she's air cooled
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What is Dino oil?

Is it different than ordinary non synthetic 10 40?

Sorry if my questions seem stupid :/. I love learning about all of this though
 

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There are no stupid questions

Oil Synopsis

dino is conventional non synthetic oil, from when the science fad of the day thought it was rendered dinosaurs
Synthetic like at Walmart Movil1 etc are NOT REAL SYNTHETIC just highly refined conventional dino oil not bad just not a synthesized molecule

Real synthetic are PAO's or Ester based oils which exhibit truly superior performance then the above Amzoil is pao, redline is ester oil, motul has ester oil
These are expensive like $15 a qt but hey it is only a qt and its air cooled and run wfo all the time
 

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Discussion Starter #8
and what about the special break in oil i have heard about here and there?

not worth the hassle?

man do i love the TW. they are such cool bikes
 

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There are no stupid questions

Oil Synopsis

dino is conventional non synthetic oil, from when the science fad of the day thought it was rendered dinosaurs
Synthetic like at Walmart Movil1 etc are NOT REAL SYNTHETIC just highly refined conventional dino oil not bad just not a synthesized molecule

Real synthetic are PAO's or Ester based oils which exhibit truly superior performance then the above Amzoil is pao, redline is ester oil, motul has ester oil
These are expensive like $15 a qt but hey it is only a qt and its air cooled and run wfo all the time
Stomper...a mild criticism:
When replying to someone who has admitted to possessing limited knowledge concerning a particular subject, please ensure that your spelling and capitalization regarding the same are correct and/or consistent. Since you misspelled "Mobil 1" in "Walmart Movil1", I first thought that "motul" referred to the same product. But that statement was contradictory to the previous passage so I had to research it further. Apparently Motul has oils which are either PAO or Ester based; indeed at least one of its products includes both! Also please explain the meaning of any less-than-obvious acronyms. Not all of us know that "PAO" equates to "Polyalphaolefin".
 

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I would suggest you use an oil compatible with wet clutches. To begin with I just used the motorcycle specific Valvoline oil available at my local Wal-Mart.
 

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Break-in oil: Motorcycle specific engine oil (non-synthetic) 10w-40. Yamaha,Hond,Suzuki and Kawasaki all have there labeled brand....who really refines their oil....who knows,but it will be wet clutch compatable (read the back of the bottle).
I've read after 1000 miles your fine (others will argue this ) to switch to full synthetic, I use Amsoil,others have their preference also. Read,read,read,you'll learn alot from this forum!!!,the folks here are outstanding!.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So it would be best to go with a motorcycle specific Dino oil?

I shall do that.

I really appreciate all of your input guys. I so enjoy learning from you all :)
 

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I would love to discuss and I am not interested at all in arguing, what exactly is the wisdom behind all this talk about when or when not to switch to full synthetic oil?

Some say use regular fossil oil for the first 1,000 or more miles while breaking in the engine. Others say wait until 2,500 before switching to full synthetic and then there are many who tout the "Superior lubricating properties" of synthetic oils.

We all know that a new motor has to be broken in which is basically a period where the rings are seating to the cylinder walls and other moving parts and bearings are all learning how to work with one another. There is also some metal particles shedding or left over from the machining process that are working their way through and depositing in the oil filter. Changing the oil during break in is essential and should be done often and there is no argument about that.

My question is two fold. If the engine is breaking in and all parts are taking a set to one another, what is the wisdom about sticking with regular fossil oil?

It seems to me if synthetic oil is in fact a "superior lubricant" it would make more sense to switch to synthetic at the first oil change and keep the engine as well lubricated as possible during this critical break in process. How could this NOT be beneficial? What wisdom says it is bad to break in with synthetic?

In the auto industry there are many brand new vehicles coming off the assembly line with full synthetic oils in them! Many of these vehicles require the use of ONLY synthetic oils from day one on.

How is it even possible that breaking in a new engine with a synthetic "superior lubricants" could be a bad thing?

In my humble opinion, new TWs come from the factory with fossil oil simply as a cost savings for Yamaha and our engines are less likely to show seepage around gaskets with it. As far as I know, Yamaha does not refine their own oils and instead they contract out to the oil refiners, most often to the lowest bidder, to put a Yamaha label on the bottle. It would not surprise me at all if the Yamalube oil that sells for $10/Qt at a dealer comes from the same vat as the oil in a bottle at Walmart that sells for under $2. I honestly have my doubts that scientific testing would prove any superiority of Yamalube over another off brand oil of the same classification. It is a well kept secret where Yamaha buys the oil in their containers and who refined it for them and you will never find the actual chemical break down of it.

Like I said above, I don't want to argue but if anyone here has real scientific proof, based on real factual testing that synthetic oil should not be used during a break in period, I would love to hear it! Personal opinions are just that! Show me the evidence.

BTW, my bike has well under 1,000 miles and is doing just fine with full synthetic, Mobil 1, Racing 4T in 10W40.

GaryL
 

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I've heard that full syn is just to slippery for good metal to metal break in on our air cooled motors....... The cars you are talking about are high quality with very close engine specs. Almost broke in from the factory...... If anyone puts at least 100 miles on an engine and wants to go with full syn....... Just go with it..... I didn't and now have over 11,000 trouble free miles and "0" oil loss between changes. OMM.
 

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I've heard that full syn is just to slippery for good metal to metal break in on our air cooled motors....... The cars you are talking about are high quality with very close engine specs. Almost broke in from the factory...... If anyone puts at least 100 miles on an engine and wants to go with full syn....... Just go with it..... I didn't and now have over 11,000 trouble free miles and "0" oil loss between changes. OMM.
That is one of the things I am getting at Max. We have all "heard" some wives tale but from who and with what actual evidence? I might agree that for the first 100 miles or so to use fossil oil. It might promote a quicker seating and shorter break in since it is not as slick.
 

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That is one of the things I am getting at Max. We have all "heard" some wives tale but from who and with what actual evidence? I might agree that for the first 100 miles or so to use fossil oil. It might promote a quicker seating and shorter break in since it is not as slick.
See post #11 :)
 

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Now wait a minute guys! I admit I am getting older, but I'm nobody's wife, nor do I tell old wives' tales!:)

Maybe I should clarify what I meant in Post #11. There's some good insight given to the OP in this thread, but I was concerned nobody had made the distinction between automotive oils and those used in motorcycles with wet clutches. While it's certainly true a few have successively used automotive oils in their TW it's also true that more than a few have used automotive oils only to find their clutch start slipping soon thereafter. This is caused by the friction modifiers found in many automotive oils. I can provide anecdotal evidence if you like. So, I felt it important to make that point for the OP, and to make it easier for the OP I provided a specific example that I've had good success with. The oil I'm referring to is Valvoline 4-Stroke Motorcycle Oil. The packaging states this oil is designed specifically for motorcycles which is important because the operating parameters for an air cooled engine that is routinely revved over 7k rpm are very different from a liquid cooled engine designed to run at lower revs for economy. The labeling also says this oil provides superior wet clutch protection. I believe Valvoline is a quality oil, and have no reservation in recommending it to the OP.

I should've known better than to get mixed up in an oil thread.:D
 

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I was just referring to the "compatible with wet clutches" and "motorcycle specific" parts.;)
 
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