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Discussion Starter #1
Getting ready to replace the clutch. I know of 2 aftermarket and then the stock Yamaha clutch. Is aftermarket better? If so, which one? Not worried about the cost. If I open the engine, I want only the best stuff going back in.
 

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I've had pretty good luck with E.B.C. Also Barnett makes a good one too. I have found Barnett's need care full set up so they won't drag and the springs make for a stiff clutch pull. That said they are tough and take lots of abuse. Either way make sure you soak the plates in clean oil before installing them.
 

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In my opinion the factory Yamaha friction plates are pretty darn good.
Lots of people have racked up lots of hard mileage on them.
I think there factory clutch springs are very useable but weak..
I replaced mine with. Barnett's springs ( 20% more spring pressure )
I have less then 1500 miles on my T-dub so I didn't replace my friction plates...
I've changed clutches in many bikes , tried lots of the aftermarket stuff...
And always had the best results with using factory friction plates and steel plates..
In conjunction with a good set of aftermarket springs.
This I'd definitely not the cheapest way to go but it works for me...
In my old dinosaur Yamaha drag bike ( Yamaha genesis ) nothing comes close to the factory
Clutch plates..( and this bike has had every clutch under the sun in it )
All of this info is just my opinion and what works best for me..
Your milage may vary
Mike from NC
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I've had pretty good luck with E.B.C. Also Barnett makes a good one too. I have found Barnett's need care full set up so they won't drag and the springs make for a stiff clutch pull. That said they are tough and take lots of abuse. Either way make sure you soak the plates in clean oil before installing them.
When you say careful setup, what do you mean? I've only done a couple of clutches and that was 30 years ago. Thanks for the info.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In my opinion the factory Yamaha friction plates are pretty darn good.
Lots of people have racked up lots of hard mileage on them.
I think there factory clutch springs are very useable but weak..
I replaced mine with. Barnett's springs ( 20% more spring pressure )
I have less then 1500 miles on my T-dub so I didn't replace my friction plates...
I've changed clutches in many bikes , tried lots of the aftermarket stuff...
And always had the best results with using factory friction plates and steel plates..
In conjunction with a good set of aftermarket springs.
This I'd definitely not the cheapest way to go but it works for me...
In my old dinosaur Yamaha drag bike ( Yamaha genesis ) nothing comes close to the factory
Clutch plates..( and this bike has had every clutch under the sun in it )
All of this info is just my opinion and what works best for me..
Your milage may vary
Mike from NC
I know the factory spends tons of time and money on clutches. They have to be able to at least last through the warranty. All kinds of riders and situations too. Of all the motorcycles I've ridden, the TW has the shortest engagement zone. I can ride it but I have to think about it too much. I want a regular feeling clutch. I just don't know if I just need springs or the whole combination. I'm gonna break it open to do the kickstarter so I might as well fix the annoying clutch too. Thanks for your input.
 
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I don't
I know the factory spends tons of time and money on clutches. They have to be able to at least last through the warranty. All kinds of riders and situations too. Of all the motorcycles I've ridden, the TW has the shortest engagement zone. I can ride it but I have to think about it too much. I want a regular feeling clutch. I just don't know if I just need springs or the whole combination. I'm gonna break it open to do the kickstarter so I might as well fix the annoying clutch too. Thanks for your input.
I don't think you will ever get a real clutch feel on a T-dub.
It's more in the design then the quality of the parts.
The performance clutch springs did make it feel a little better.
I don't think you will ever make it feel like other bikes.
It's more of an off / on switch..
It is what it is.
 
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Sorry I replied a little too soon. The Barnett plates are often times thicker than stock so if you install them without first checking the push rod free play they will drag. It's a real P.I.T.A.because you have to pull the clutch cover back off,set the push rod free play and hope the gasket is still good. EBC's on the other hand have never needed an adjustment from stock. At least for me.
 

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I have done two Barnett Kevlar clutches in my TW's and it is no big deal.

There is a pointer on the lever the cable attaches to and a line cast into the case. Adjust the screw in the center of the clutch basket until the pointer points to the line, lock the lock nut, and you are done. Everything else is cable adjustment. Very easy.

BTW, as I have said many times before, Barnett Kevlar Clutches cost twice as much as cork clutches and are worth it! And Barnett HD springs make the clutch lever just a little bit harder to squeeze. A little bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks to all of you for responding. Lots of great info. You guys have me wanting to try all kinds of stuff. Sounds like there is no bad way to go.

Has anyone tried to "fix" the on/off clutch engagement? Just wondering if a longer arm at shaft might do it? Or a shorter arm?
 

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In my opinion the factory Yamaha friction plates are pretty darn good.
Lots of people have racked up lots of hard mileage on them.
I think there factory clutch springs are very useable but weak..
I replaced mine with. Barnett's springs ( 20% more spring pressure )
I have less then 1500 miles on my T-dub so I didn't replace my friction plates...
I've changed clutches in many bikes , tried lots of the aftermarket stuff...
And always had the best results with using factory friction plates and steel plates..
In conjunction with a good set of aftermarket springs.
This I'd definitely not the cheapest way to go but it works for me...
In my old dinosaur Yamaha drag bike ( Yamaha genesis ) nothing comes close to the factory
Clutch plates..( and this bike has had every clutch under the sun in it )
All of this info is just my opinion and what works best for me..
Your milage may vary
Mike from NC
I did replace mine with Barnett friction plates and springs. You are correct about the stock clutches being very good though. I think it was around 40,000 miles when I replaced my stock clutch plates. That said I did everything wrong according to the forum. I always ran 20w/50w Valvoline, the same stuff you would use in your car. I got a light slip so I added a couple of ounces of Lucas Heavy duty oil stabilizer. I did this for years. Needless to say but I just decided to change my clutches out because they were so old. Odd enough the stock clutch plates still were in spec. I changed them out and used the motorcycle spec'd oil. No great difference in my opinion. No great clutch difference. I have never had slippage with the Barnetts but I blame me on the stock plates slipping with non-MC oil. With the Lucas I never had an issue of the stock clutches slipping.
 

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I think the Yamaha friction plates are about $50 including tax and shipping for all five
The Barnett springs should be about another $20 for four.
If your steel plates aren't blued or warped and still in spec I would just reuse them.
I don't know what the Barnett Kevlar kit cost
Never been a fan of the ebc clutch plates
 
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