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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure in what year Yamaha added the odometer to the TW, but my '93 has just the speedometer, no odometer. Trying to figure out about how much fuel I've used is a matter of having to peer into the tank and guess. It would also be nice to have one when calculating distances on rides.



If I find one from a newer TW, will it work on the older bike? Or, is there an third-party solution that might be a better option? I know Mr. Gizmo will know the answer to this one as he has every gadget known to man on his bike...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not inclined to use a bicycle speedo/odometer. I would doubt they go to 60 mph or more and they are not likely to be lighted. Newer TWs have the speedometer with a resettable "trip meter" as a device under that. That is what I'm after. Can the older system be retrofitted with this newer equipment?
 

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I had a trailtech vapor speedo on my DR650. It worked well. I don't think it would be entirely to hard to adapt a newer TW speedo to your bike though.
 

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Bicycle computers have proven to be dead nuts accurate to 200 mph. Even cheap ones. I have one on my Goldwing and have had it on two or three bikes before that. Batteries literally last for years.



You could use one as a trip odometer and it would prolly cost less than 20 bucks, however they aren't backlit and most of the solutions for lighting them up at night are pretty hinky.



The Vapor is hands-down the way to go, but if you want the late model TW setup with the resettable analog trip meter it's also identical to the analog XT250/350/500/550/600 speedo from the early '80's up.



Even the wiring pigtail will plug right into your early TW. Late Tw's had different connectors, but the same speedo.



In fact any Yamaha product that had a 21" front wheel will probly interchange with a TW.
 

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Ahhh, so you have the odometer but want the tripometer also? Would be handy. I just use my gps to see how many miles I've gone or remember where the odometer was at. Would be cool if you could get the newer odometer/tripometer combo (used?) and it bolted right up. Has anyone out here done that?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm beginning to research the bicycle "computer" as they call them idea. I can get something that will do the job for about $20 locally. I saw this online that was very informative. Should I undertake this, I will post how-to photos and report on my success, or lack there-of. Thanks...
 

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lizrdbrth said:
I have an early BC800 and it works great. Not just great for the money, but I'm talking as accurate as GPS.



I used it for a backup odometer when doing Iron Butts because my analog stuff was always so far off.



If you decide to go that route the trick is in the setup. You can use the wheel radius calculaion method for ballpark, but if you really want it to be accurate use the rolling circumnerence method. But don't just wrap a measuring tape around the tire or it will be ballpark, too. The BC800 allows for both methods. It's a sophisticated little booger for what it costs and Sigma's more expensive models have features which mostly pertain to bicyclists, so there's really not much point in buying those. I think there's a backlit one now but the backlight is only momentary and you have to push a button to see it. I may be wrong, things get better every day..



Tie a string around the front tire and rim very tightly. Roll the bike forward til the string marker is on the ground. Make a mark on the floor. Then roll the bike forward one revolution of the tire until the string hits the ground again and mark the floor again. Measure ACCURATELY the distance between the two marks on the foor, enter it into the bike computer and your speedo will be dead on at any MPH.



If you want to get really anal about it write the number down, then go for a ride with a good GPS unit running alongside the bike speedo. If the numbers don't totally agree you can go up or down from your original number by as by as little as 1/4", re-enter that number until it's as accurate as your GPS.



The author of your link was correct. Those rare earth magnets will stay on a brake disc bolt head through Armageddon, but I'd still epoxy them on if you do any offroading.


Note: This also the best way to calibrate the TrailTech Vapor, et al, if anyone is interested. You can also calibrate them to a gnat's posterior using the radius method but it requires too much guesstimation and mental gymnastics for my remaining brain cells.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
>>Those rare earth magnets will stay on a brake disc bolt head through Armageddon<<<



Which would be great IF I had a disc brake...
This is a '93 with a front drum brake. If I had a newer bike, it would probably have a trip meter and I'd not be doing this.



Looking at the TW, I see a good mounting location so as to get the pickup and magnet in close proximity might be to mount the magnet on the rear sprocket and the pickup on the swingarm. Any reason this should not work if the rig was mounted on the back wheel??
 

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Drums do require some creativity. The same problem exists with the Trailtech units.



The ideal place I'm seeing on the rear would be to mount the reed switch on the backing plate and the magnet in the groove on the drum, but it would require making a bracket for the switch and tapping a couple of holes in the backing plate for the pickup mount. Lotta work, but it wouldn't go out of alignment out of with chain adjustments.



Next best would be your method using either the sprocket bolt hesds or the sprocket itself for the magnet. You could probably do the usual double-sided tape and a couple of zipties to hold the switch inside the swingarm. This lasts for years on the front, but chain lube may soften the glue in the tape over time on that side of the swingarm. A more secure way might be to mount the pickup to a "U" shaped piece of light sheet metal shaped to grip the swingarm. That way you could use zipties and be able to "side" the switch anywhere along the inner side of the swingarm then ziptie it in place.



The one easily accessible spot I'm seeing up front is the brake cable adjuster lug. You could probably make a simple bracket that would be retained by the jam nuts for the brake cable and mount the pickup on that.



The ultimate would be to sink the magnet into the brass speedometer drive gear ih the hub and stuff the pickup in the speedo cable hole. Protected and permanent, but I've never got around to that.



I dunno. Just thinking out loud. The internet used to have tons of discussions on the subject and I'm prolly overthinking it. I'm sure someone out there has put either a Vapor or a bicycle computer on a drum in a simpler manor.
 

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Won't those bicycle computer sensors just tie into the fork leg? I had to rig a bracket for the sensor Trailtech recommended, but I think a bicycle sensor (or other Trailtech sensors, for that matter) would mount easier.







The magnet was easy, I just epoxied it onto one of the spoke ends:







As far as the Vapor and drum braked TW's go, a Trailtech sensor like this would probably be a better idea than what they recommend:



 

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I changed out my 97's speedometer for a newer one with an odometer, it came off a junked XT225. It fits and works perfectly.
 
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