TW200 Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I typically detour on way to or from Moab, sometimes overnighting at a desert hot springs. Turns out there are numerous abandoned mines and ghost tons worth exploring in the adjacent mountains between Austin, NV and the Arc Dome Wilderness. Roads look generally smooth and endless.
I may just have to spend a few days exploring.
Anyone wishing to have an mini adventure on their way to the major adventure is welcome to join me if traversing HWY 50 to MOAB2018.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Mine workings and ruins are simple, nothing special but they have a sparse beauty and make worthwhile destinations. 115571881.jpg 73144020.jpg
........
70299276.jpg
Mostly rolling basin and range terrain with what looks like many a tank full of TW wandering potential. 103692941.jpg
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Mel knows of a similar region next valley to the east, Monitor Valley with it's famous Belmont Ghost Town. 6946087.jpg
I have to pick Mel's brain for details on finding the campsite and hot springs he discovered in Monitor Valley.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,814 Posts
there must be 100's of chimney's through out Nevada. while we were traveling along the Loneliest highway in America this spring, we stopped for a few day at Illipah Reservoir. the wife and i jumped on the TW and headed up into the mountains to check out the remains of an old mining area and the old town of Hamilton. not much 516.JPG left, but one thing caught my interest and that was an old chimney. it was well built, but the thing of interest was that there were no openings in the thing, except at the top. can't figure out how they used it


517.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Really nice chimney photo green.
Lots of the gold and silver ores in the region were refractory meaning they required roasting before processing, or total smelting to recover the metal content. As such charcoal production was a major industry that de-nuded many a forested slope. A great example off HWY 50 outside of Ely,NV are the Ward charcoal ovens. Only about 8 miles off the highway and accessible for travel trailers. Site is an historic landmark, protected, and in very good shape. Another nice place to overnight on an extended trip. tom_mcewan_kilns.jpg

ward-charcoal-ovens-1[6].jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,544 Posts
View attachment 146266
......we stopped for a few day at Illipah Reservoir. the wife and i jumped on the TW and headed up into the mountains to check out the remains of an old mining area and the old town of Hamilton. not much left, but one thing caught my interest and that was an old chimney. it was well built, but the thing of interest was that there were no openings in the thing, except at the top. can't figure out how they used it
Interesting article in the 1941 Desert Magazine about Hamilton: Publication Name:

12,000 folks there in summer of 1869!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Nelson is another relic of Nevada's boom-an-bust past with some interesting leftovers: 1167_nelson_abandoned-car.jpg
wrecked plane.jpg
Rather than the aftermath of a bad take-off after too many beers this plane was actually staged as a prop for a movie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Irregardless White Pine County, Nevada offers many a ghost town worth visiting. They typically give the visitor a sense of discovery and thus special memories that a more touristic site like Tombstone could ever give. More likely to see antelope or wild burros than other humans, much less another TW. 349fd5e34b7520220952d7204b38d0ab--white-pines-ghost-towns.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
And if you don't like mines greewn perhaps found the true treasure of the region, the Northern Nevada Steam Train out of Ely.
While you can still get a tourist ride at times this remains an honest railroad. Seeing any steam engine pulling it's weight these days is a treat from the past. Pause in Ely and visit the museum, look at the schedule and maybe you can ride, or see the train pull out of town and climb the grade out of the canyon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Moab in the spring means cold weather in Ely. All the better to see the condensation from the steam locomotives. Any train fans would get a kick out of this, I sure did. Not my video, but wife and I gleefully chased the steam engine out of Ely one morning on way home from Great Basin National Park.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
...and if you pay attention to the train schedules it is amazing what you can get away with in Nevada.;)

Shows you can have fun with even less horsepower than a TW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Damn nice pictures Fred. I have the time, if warm enough, might just have to detour thru the silver state coming or going from Utah.
Had never seen that rail riding, looks like a hoot!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top