TW200 Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need some warmer gear to extend my riding season, and have noticed that Cycle Gear has a new line of adventure gear out. It looks real good but am wondering how warm it is and if anybody knows if this brand is durable. Here is a link to the new gear: http://www.cyclegear.com/eng/product/bilt_explorer_waterproof_adventure_jacket/web1011534

Thanks for any help, everybody. I am not looking to layer clothes or anything, just want to put something on over a long sleeve shirt and ride in 40 degree weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
It's a pretty good looking jacket(very European); but I don't think it'll be warm enough at 40*F. Most quality coats/jackets will give a temp. range to work with; but I didn't see one on this link. Email 'em and ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,369 Posts
The Bilt stuff is kinda case-by-case. Some of it's as good as the big names, some of it is adequate entry level stuff and minus a few features that you may not at first notice, etc.. None of it totally sucks, but IMO it's best viewed in their stores rather than sight unseen.



We own a lot of their stuff but we have a physical location near us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
I agree with lizrdbrth, The cyclegear branded stuff has some real values and some real stinkers.



I have a Bilt offroad helmet that I got at 50% off for $50, and I love it. I also have a pair of Sedici (their step-up from bilt marque) gloves that have been great, but after about 4000mi of riding they're starting to fall apart.



The good news is that all of their stuff has a lifetime guarantee, so the next time I ride by their store across town I can swap out the gloves for a fresh pair.



All in all I'm partial to alpinestars gear myself, but I think their Durban adventure jacket, while doubtlessly more durable, is a little overpriced at $700.



I'd rethink you're aversion to layering and save some serious dough if I were you though. A $12 thermal long sleeve shirt from target under a t-shirt and my armored textile jacket keeps me toasty warm on the 40 degree ride to work, and I can take it off to stay cooler on the 75 degree ride home in the afternoon. Best of both worlds without having to spring for a new jacket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
For those who care a little less about style and a little more about warmth, and are not concerned with a little bulk ...

My solution is simple: Carhart apparel. When I'm winter riding (which here can mean down into the 20s pretty easily), or riding any length of slab at <50F, I usually can be found in an entirely attractive setup consisting of:



* good warm boots (surprising how much difference this makes)

* good warm gloves (unsurprising, but still a big difference), look for some less bulky snowmobiling gloves, not mittens.

* jeans, and possibly long underwear depending on how long I'm planning to stay out

* carhart mechanic / agriculture style insulated overalls (brown duck material): my wife calls these my "lady getters" (got her, didn't I?
)

* long sleeve shirt

* hooded sweatshirt (hood makes a difference here, roll it to form a bundle around the back of your neck)

* carhart jacket, 3/4 length, not the standard short length. Mine is an insulated type meant for winter, not the normal brown thin one.



The jacket is pretty well windproof up to 50mph, and with all the padding up top, I feel a lot better about the idea of dumping the bike: it's no substitution for proper armor, but I don't have the money for that and a good windproof jacket that'll fit over it.



This setup is quite bulky, but the ticket is to avoid letting air hit any part of your exposed flesh: 1 square inch of which will chill you faster than anything else.



Food for thought, at least. I'd rather be warm and ridiculous than just ridiculous.



I also put a homemade lexan windshield and made some large coverage rubber extensions to fit over my handguards, these help immensely, but the windshield isn't very hardcore offroad friendly.



EDIT: Oh yeah, you should wear underwear too, for the sake of completeness. Every bit helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
For those who care a little less about style and a little more about warmth, and are not concerned with a little bulk ...

My solution is simple: Carhart apparel. When I'm winter riding (which here can mean down into the 20s pretty easily), or riding any length of slab at <50F, I usually can be found in an entirely attractive setup consisting of:



* good warm boots (surprising how much difference this makes)

* good warm gloves (unsurprising, but still a big difference), look for some less bulky snowmobiling gloves, not mittens.

* jeans, and possibly long underwear depending on how long I'm planning to stay out

* carhart mechanic / agriculture style insulated overalls (brown duck material): my wife calls these my "lady getters" (got her, didn't I?
)

* long sleeve shirt

* hooded sweatshirt (hood makes a difference here, roll it to form a bundle around the back of your neck)

* carhart jacket, 3/4 length, not the standard short length. Mine is an insulated type meant for winter, not the normal brown thin one.



The jacket is pretty well windproof up to 50mph, and with all the padding up top, I feel a lot better about the idea of dumping the bike: it's no substitution for proper armor, but I don't have the money for that and a good windproof jacket that'll fit over it.



This setup is quite bulky, but the ticket is to avoid letting air hit any part of your exposed flesh: 1 square inch of which will chill you faster than anything else.



Food for thought, at least. I'd rather be warm and ridiculous than just ridiculous.



I also put a homemade lexan windshield and made some large coverage rubber extensions to fit over my handguards, these help immensely, but the windshield isn't very hardcore offroad friendly.



EDIT: Oh yeah, you should wear underwear too, for the sake of completeness. Every bit helps.


This sounds very similar to my old "uniform" back when I sold Christmas trees and spent 14-18 hours a day outside in the cold, rain, snow, etc. for 6 weeks straight every year for many years.



Warm, yes. Protective? Not so much. A little bit of CE armor goes a long way in the event of a crash.



Natural fibers like denim and canvas grip the rough surface of asphalt and tear apart. That's why protective gear is made of leather or slick synthetic textiles that slide over the surface of the road. Less friction means the jacket actually stays put together long enough to keep your skin from touching the pavement while you slide to a stop. A moto magazine did a comparison test a little while back where they dropped 50lbs bags of sand wrapped in various materials off the back of a pickup truck going 55mph. Denim blew apart almost instantly, and despite popular opinion synthetic MC jacket textile held up even better than leather.



If you're wearing a jacket with CE elbow armor, you can throw your elbow into a block wall as hard as you can and barely feel it. I've done it! I love Carhartt, but their stuff doesn't do that.



High quality protective gear isn't as much fun to spend money on as motorcycles and accessories, but if you ever need it it's definitely the best money a motorcyclist can spend.



Here's hoping that none of us ever have a chance to seriously field-test our riding gear!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
I'll admit to not spending much on accessories or motorcycles, and similarly little on riding gear, and also that carhart gear is no match for real protection. My effectively 1-season protective riding jacket doesn't fit under my carharts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Right now cycle gear has cold weather underwear on sale. I bought the full jump suit for fifty bucks. Has not gotten cold yet in fresno so i can't review performance..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
I don't know about Bilt, but I have an Olympia AST 2 that is warm at 40, only problem for me is that I don't have any pants too keep my other half as warm when riding is that cold. With the liner out and all the vents it isn't too oppressive in the summer either given that it is a more winter jacket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
I have had good and bad luck with Bilt stuff. The only real bad luck I had was there winter pants. They do have a 5 year warranty and my local Cycle Gear is really good about returns.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top