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Funny, the only time I drowned my TW was in the Desert! Crossed a steam of unknown depth(I know) and got up to the tank in water. After dragging the bike to dry land and sitting in the Utah sun for 15 minutes, it started right up and we continued on our way. After 5000 miles the bike just keeps getting better!

As I side note, when a lot younger and crazier, my friend rode his TS 185 into a lake. We pulled it out and removed the head of that little two stroke with the bike's tool kit, pumped the water out of it, reassembled and rode off. He swears the bike ran better after that!

Not sure if I have a point to make with these stories but drowning an engine is not necessarily a death sentance.
 

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The air intake on a TW is under the seat behind the battery. If you have the carb lines set right with the overflow tube Y connected and up under the tank the bike should be able to cross short streams going slow just about up to the tank. This of course depends upon if your air filter cover is sealed properly. I would not recommend jerking around in deep crossings for very long and I also don't recommend dunking a very hot engine quickly into cold water. I would have more concern over electrical connectors shorting out as long as the engine, carb and air systems are all properly functioning. Those who have owned and towed boats any long distances for fishing trips should be well aware to allow the wheel bearings to cool prior to submerging them. If they go under while warm or hot they tend to suck water in, hence the use of spring loaded Bearing Buddies on boat trailers.

GaryL
 

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Best thing to do after dunking one is pull the plug and crank it over a bit, and pull the side cover on the air filter and tilt it left or pop the little drain under the airbox. Only takes a moment doing it this way and you won't run the risk of a hydrolock. Even if you sat in the sun for a long time, if by chance the point the engine died was right at the end of the intake stroke and the cylinder is full of water, the damage occurs as soon as you turn the key or kick it over right at the beginning of the compression stroke, so removing the plug just lets it come out the spark plug hole and avoids disaster. The remaining little amounts of water in the system for a short duration doesn't hurt anything, but you can't compress liquid which is what causes all that destruction in the top end and possibly to the main bearing/connecting rod.
 

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The first thing you did when you bought a used bike was change the tires. Good idea, but you should have changed the old too. Its the first thing I do when I buy anything with an engine. I don't care if it came from a dealer with paperwork showing a recent oil change, I still change it.
 

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That might not have achieved anything if the owner had just changed it and cleaned out all the rust particles in the filter. :mad: The only engine I ever saw with that much rust in the bottom end came out of the ocean where it had sat for 6 months. :nightmare:
 

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I was going to stay out of this but after another look at the pictures I'm sure by now the bearing races have pitted. No amount of flushing is going to solve that. It's time for a complete rebuild or as others have said replacement and yes I've been in the motorcycle biz. for a very long time.:p
 

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Best thing to do after dunking one is pull the plug and crank it over a bit, and pull the side cover on the air filter and tilt it left or pop the little drain under the airbox. Only takes a moment doing it this way and you won't run the risk of a hydrolock. Even if you sat in the sun for a long time, if by chance the point the engine died was right at the end of the intake stroke and the cylinder is full of water, the damage occurs as soon as you turn the key or kick it over right at the beginning of the compression stroke, so removing the plug just lets it come out the spark plug hole and avoids disaster. The remaining little amounts of water in the system for a short duration doesn't hurt anything, but you can't compress liquid which is what causes all that destruction in the top end and possibly to the main bearing/connecting rod.
This reminds me of a hydrolock I had on an old Honda I had. I tried to turn the engine over slowly with the kickstarter and it wouldn't move. I pulled out the plugs, squirted wd-40 down the sparkplug holes thinking the rings were rusted. The next day I kicked it and a big blob of oil shot all the way across the garage and SPLATTTTTTT all over my wall. Anyway, after that I had it running really quick.
 

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The first thing you did when you bought a used bike was change the tires. Good idea, but you should have changed the old too. Its the first thing I do when I buy anything with an engine. I don't care if it came from a dealer with paperwork showing a recent oil change, I still change it.
Yup...it's the FIRST thing I do when I get a new (to me) bike (or any vehicle) home...out with the old and in with the new. That way you have a new baseline to work from.
Whenever I buy a truck or car, it gets an oil and filter change...new air and fuel filters...then a trip to the Transmission shop for new fluid. If there is documentation to show work done recently, I may forgo some of this but definitely new engine oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Hello all, just wanted to say thanks for all the responses. Unfortunately this project got put on hold for awhile but I'm back to it.

I have found a few complete bottom ends here and there. Does anyone know if there were any changes to the bottom end pre 2001 and post? For instance, if I bought a 98' bottom end, would I have any issues in mounting it in the frame/bolting up the cylinder, etc?

Also, just to clarify, the oil, air filter, and plug were all changed immediately after purchase. Oil was dark but otherwise fine. AI didn't mention, my brother did put an hour or so on this bike before delivery (It was purchased as a gift for our mom). I think where I went wrong was not immediately draining the crankcase oil after the water incident. I did drain the airbox and carb float, and added fogging oil to the top end, but to no avail, as obviously there was a ton of water in the bottom end. Shit happens I guess.
 

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I'm pretty sure a pre 2001 would work there without mods. I think the only difference is that pre 2001 it had a kick starter as well.
 

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I know this is an old thread but you could fill it up with vinegar and let it sit for about a week. It would clean and loosen most of the rust. Heat and an oil change would remove any vinegar left over.
 

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Lot's of good stories and advice. What's the latest prognosis?
? erm! , well I think it’s a full strip/ rebuild job, I would not trust a second hand motor that I had no history of, and I would personally want to strip it and check it out before trusting it in case of it exploding at speed and high rpm,s
As I have already said in a previous post “ why do bike manufacturers not provide refurbed spare engines the same as car manufacturers do ? The generic forum answers were on the lines of ....... they make more money out of you by You buying spare parts to rebuild than fit a refurbed motor !
The other answers were pretty much , “plenty parts out there to rebuild “
 

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I'm pretty sure a pre 2001 would work there without mods. I think the only difference is that pre 2001 it had a kick starter as well.
Amongst the many differences, is that the pre-2k stator only produced 35W, the 2k+ upped that to over 55w - expect various connector differences as well, otherwise - play on ....
 

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Hello,
I repaired a TW125 engine (same 200) that stayed in water for 4 days.
I repaired the crankshaft kit new connecting rod,
Clean each part of the gearbox with a wire brush,
Replace the cylinder and piston,
All the bearings have been cleaned with petroleum then oiled,
The cylinder head after cleaning (no damage), I rectified the valves,
Photo
HPIM0623.JPG HPIM0627.JPG HPIM0628.JPG HPIM0632.JPG
 
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