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Hey guys just bought a brand new 2019 TW. Got a great deal buying it in 2020. First things first I’m super stoked to finally have my own TW and looking forward to talking to you guys about the bike.
I’d like to know if you guys recommend any must do accessory add-ons or aftermarket parts that are positively recommend for safety or bike reliability. I will be riding the bike around town and off-road in the UP of Michigan.
 

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Bigger pegs are a nice low cost upgrade. The stock front tire has been known to cause troubles for some off road. Use caution as you see if it’s ok for you. Lots of options if you want to upgrade it. The stock skid plate is somewhat weak if you’re navigating big rocks. There are a few aftermarket pieces that offer better protection. Enjoy your new bike!
 

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Tusk handlebar lever/hand protectors. One little drop w/o them and your clutch or brake lever could be toast. Larger pegs, new front tire - Kenda 241 are good. SO many others lol! But this would be a good start - plemty of toys to add on are readily available. Procycle is a good place to see what's available
Enjoy!
 

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I think the bike is fine as it comes off the showroom floor....assuming they have prepped it correctly..... the only changes I would make would be the addition of a rear rack and a kick starter....I will add that I have not added a kick started but I ride it in a manner that would allow a compression start if necessary and I keep the battery charged
 

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Big welcome & congradulations!

I feel nothing is really "MUST DO" for safety nor reliability. However the above suggestions summarize well the more common add-ons based on rider experience.
Maybe ride a bit before major changes.

It really is not too hard to ride beyond the capabilities of the stock front tire. Hate to see you crash on your early wet strong cornering attempts or sandy pavement but it would allow you to later really appreciate any subsequent purchase of a better tire ( something like a Shinko 241 or 244). While many will say the stock tire is fine but I think this is from lack of experience with anything else. Put another way I know of no one who claims to have gone back to a TrailWing tire in the front after experimenting with an alternative tire.

Next is handguards to protect your investment. Broken levers or perches after a minor tip over, even in the garage, are not uncommon. Brushguards like the popular ~$55 D-flex model can protect bars as well as your hands. Depending on personal budget one can spend twice, or half that amount.

With a few miles under your belt you may realize the stock suspension could be better. Usually TWs come with inadequate amount of fork oil for adequate rebound dampening and husky Americans. Probably OK if you weigh 140 pounds though.

Much of the rest is ergonomics, but a more comfortable posture allows greater control and comfort which translates into both safer at normal speeds and the ability to push the bike harder. Thus the ever popular wider foot pegs, handlebar risers and superior seat foam.

Once comfy, capable and competent on the new bike you'll likely want to range further afield thus the cargo rack. Might find yourself wanting to go moto-camping or simply use the TW haul home beer and a pizza and the mail using the rack.

Above all go have fun and learn to interface well with the new bike. They are different but lots of fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah!
Love the support. I will defiantly be getting a few of these... Never heard of the front tire being an issue (please elaborate).
 

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It all depends on the kind of riding you do and the surfaces encountered. The stock tire is fine on dry pavement or reasonably hard dirt surfaces. It gets progressively more likely to let go without warning as the surfaces get wetter and softer. It also doesn't do well on small to large gravel. The tread design just doesn't have the grip on these surfaces that a trials tire like the Shinko 241 has. That tire will still let go, but it gives a little warning by skidding instead of instant loss of traction. A significant difference also occurs on downhill braking and turning. The end result is that the Shinko just feels more planted and controllable in all those types of riding, leading to more confidence. Having your front tire wash out suddenly without warning is not confidence building! Most of us out in the West have switched because we have lots of hills, lots of gravel, lots of wet rocks, etc.
 

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Hey guys just bought a brand new 2019 TW. Got a great deal buying it in 2020. First things first I’m super stoked to finally have my own TW and looking forward to talking to you guys about the bike.
I’d like to know if you guys recommend any must do accessory add-ons or aftermarket parts that are positively recommend for safety or bike reliability. I will be riding the bike around town and off-road in the UP of Michigan.
i absolutely CANNOT believe they still make the TW. Wait, i got it. Yamaha is going for it, they want to beat Volkswagens record. Go Yamaha!
 

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Brand-new, ride it as it is for a few weeks. What worked for others doesn't mean it's a need for you. Yamaha got it pretty good in the start. You just finish for yourself.
I've done a bunch of stuff that other have or will mention, some necessary and others not-so-much if you know what I mean.
My first mod was changing the stock footpegs to adult size. I actually didn't let anyone see the bike until I did that. Too ridiculous but it didn't make the bike go faster or perform better, ha.
 

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The first thing I add to any bike I ride off road is a skid plate and handguards. As mentioned in the posts above, a simple tip over in the garage (or anywhere for that matter) can result in at least a bent lever; worse case scenario being a broken master cylinder. As far as skid plates go, the stock one can be folded in half with your hands. Don't let this happen to you! :cry:

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The first thing I add to any bike I ride off road is a skid plate and handguards. As mentioned in the posts above, a simple tip over in the garage (or anywhere for that matter) can result in at least a bent lever; worse case scenario being a broken master cylinder. As far as skid plates go, the stock one can be folded in half with your hands. Don't let this happen to you! :cry:

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Ouchie!
 

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If I were to buy a brand new TW the very first thing I would do before leaving the dealer is have a good O or X ring chain installed and stash the stock one in a box so you can laugh at it for an easy 10,000 miles of near maintenance free riding. It might cost you between $70- $100 to buy and have installed but it will save you countless hours of constant adjustments and your chain and sprockets will last 2-3 times as long. Clean and re use the original oil filter at every change and if or when you or any shop does change/replace the oil filter make absolutely sure it has 4 tiny holes on the engine side. Oil is cheap but engines are costly so change it often and do it right from instructions you can find here. All the rest up above are basic add on farkles that make the TW yours and help to avoid catastrophic bumps and bruises. Creature comforts is what I call them but none are needed unless you want them.

GaryL
 

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When I joined the forum, your question was the exact same question in my first post, just to cover all your bases and the some, here's the link with some awesome input from the forum members!

 

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I think a new TW is great as it is and there are no “requirements”. Of course there are plenty of options - my first was a Jimbo shield.
 

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I think bike protection is an absolute requirement. I snapped and replaced both levers before I installed the Tusk handguards. They have saved my levers during a fall a few times, but more importantly - my hands! I mostly ride pretty rough jeep trails and have only knocked my crankcase one time with no damage. But, as soon as that happened, I installed a Ricochet skid plate. Think of those two things as riding boots and a helmet for the TW.
 

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I will say what I have done/wish I have done...

LED headlight (the oem bulb runs on a ton of power)
Heated grips are nice but not needed if you are riding slow, I would rather have wind blocking....
Bark busters/other reinforced bar protector. Remember you will drop this bike (off a cliff) and the factory levers break/bend.
beadrider seat is the best bang for you buck seating upgrade
Get an SAE quick disconnect for charging, this way you don't have to take the seat off each time you need to get to the battery.
RAM mirrors double ball folding mirrors. They are expensive but man are they nice, 30 seconds your mirrors are folded down. Very high quality mirrors/little vibration.
Skid plate is a must.
I have the cheap rack on the back that bolts to the turn signals...its fine for a tent/sleeping roll. However if you want to haul a deer our spend the extra $50 bucks and get the rack that bolts on to the pegs at the frame.
I bought the IMS foot pegs for $45...but you could easily find a knock off for less than half that. This is a must, falling off a peg is not safe.
I like the clean look of a fender eliminator kit/small rear turn signals.

In terms of reliability upgrades: the battery connector is helpful. These bikes are build a s#it house of brick. They keep chugging away no matter what. I put 1,500 miles of grueling Alaskan trails and it still keeps chugging away.
In terms of safety: Skid plate/bark busters/larger pegs... the rest are comfort upgrades because with this bike, you will want to ride it 24-7 so get comfy because you will see more amazing stuff on a TW than any other bike.

binge watch tdubskid on youtube and you will learn a few things about the bike.
 

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Here's what I did to the old bike and now to the new one:

Jimbo shield, cycleracks, led insturment lights, gel seat cover, 15/47 sprockets, 0-ring chain, JNS engineering LED headlight (on the new bike)
 
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