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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a new 2018 as I could not find a used one that I liked. I wish I could say that I'm ecstatic but I'm not. Long story short I cannot shift the thing...and never mind finding Neutral. I can stomp down on the shift lever and jam it into first but going up the gears just does not happen most of the time, on occasion I can get it into second and third but with a lot of force. I know it's not the way it's supposed to be. The dealership sent over a mechanic (good kid) who readjusted the clutch to perfection, stood next to the bike, pulled the clutch and with his right foot shifted seamlessly up and down thru the gears and found Neutral every time. I get on the bike, pull the clutch, shift into first, tried for second and just could not do it no matter how much force I applied, that lever just would not click into second. I am convinced there is nothing wrong with the bike or the mechanic would have trailered it back to the dealership if there was. I cannot think about what I could be doing wrong. I know it's a new bike and things have to break in but a shift lever should move every time you apply up or down pressure. Any of you gentlemen have some suggestions for me? Getting used to the shift lever? As the mechanic very gently suggested? He could tell I was frustrated, hahaha. Thanks for any suggestions.
 

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Try shifting the bike with the motor off. Put it on a box so the rear tire is off the ground as that is easiest. Then kneel down next to the bike on the shifter side and see if you can shift it. You may need to rotate the rear tire in the forward direction, which is why I recommend putting the bike on a stand so the rear tire is off the ground. You should easily be able to go through the gears with your hand and maybe a little rear tire rotation. Once that's proven to be functional, try sitting on the bike and doing the same thing with your foot. If successful, then start the bike's motor and let it warm up. Repeat trying the shifting by hand, but this time use the clutch with each shift. If that all works, then straddle the bike and try it with your foot. And finally, take the bike off the stand and ride for effect.
Some bikes are harder shifting until the oil is warmed up.
Good luck.
 

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Check this clutch return spring. It should be connected as shown and is often not.

 

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Try pulling in the clutch and rolling the bike slightly forward as you try to shift.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Welcome. Have you ridden other motorcycles before or is this your first bike?
To answer your question a little better: my first and only motorcycle was 50 years ago so consider me a complete novice. Would that make a difference to the functionality of the shift lever?
 

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If you are moving, you've got it in gear. :D I was talking about sitting on a stationary running bike such as in the driveway or at a light or something and struggling to put it in gear.
Thank you but maybe I misunderstood you. How am I going to do that while I'm moving, when the motorcycle is moving?
 

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Update your signature line so we can at least tell your general location. Someone giving you internet advice or even just reading this thread might be right by you.
If my clutch cable needs adjustment I'd do what Tommy said and obviously from a standing/stopped position, roll it forward until it catches or slips into gear.
But you say you have no problem getting into 1st gear, just upshifting into 2nd and higher, right?

I was having almost the same problem a few weeks ago when I was riding off-road. Turns out the boots I was wearing was the issue. The foot shifter was too far "up" so I pulled it off and relocated it just a couple teeth "downward". No further problems. Funny thing is if I was just riding around town wearing sneakers... no problem.
 

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When you pull in the clutch lever, do you feel resistance right away, or is there free play?
 

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Check that the chain is not too tight when you have your full weight on the bike. An over tightened chain can make shifting very difficult. As the chain will tighten as the swing arm rotates when you sit on the bike and loosen when it's on the sidestand or with no weight on it, that could explain why it shifted easily for the mechanic.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Update your signature line so we can at least tell your general location. Someone giving you internet advice or even just reading this thread might be right by you.
If my clutch cable needs adjustment I'd do what Tommy said and obviously from a standing/stopped position, roll it forward until it catches or slips into gear.
But you say you have no problem getting into 1st gear, just upshifting into 2nd and higher, right?

I was having almost the same problem a few weeks ago when I was riding off-road. Turns out the boots I was wearing was the issue. The foot shifter was too far "up" so I pulled it off and relocated it just a couple teeth "downward". No further problems. Funny thing is if I was just riding around town wearing sneakers... no problem.
Wow, I had the thought that it could be my shoes but it made no sense to me. I’m def going to first change shoes, if that does not work, I’ll set the lever as you did. Thank you!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Check that the chain is not too tight when you have your full weight on the bike. An over tightened chain can make shifting very difficult. As the chain will tighten as the swing arm rotates when you sit on the bike and loosen when it's on the sidestand or with no weight on it, that could explain why it shifted easily for the mechanic.
Damn you guys are good. I will try both Stagewex and your suggestions. BTW I’m sure you know how to measure chain slack...mind telling me?
 
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