TW200 Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hi folks, tremendous site. Thanks to all who contribute, has confirmed my interest in tw200 to the point of buying a new one now.
no old ones kicking about here in New Zealand.
my question is this, having read a lot here about exhausts and jets, and the likes, I kinda feel that the bike might be best tweaked as stock, but I’m uncerTain exactly what to request done before I receive it.
i understand there’s a pilot screw adjustment etc?
so what can I ask them to do before I sign on the line?
theyre good guys, and very accommodating.
many thanks.
im at sea level, and it doesn’t get that cold in the winter less north.
im 6’1 and will be mostly gravel roads and short commute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,482 Posts
Don't let the shop even touch your bike other than the routine set-up!!!!! :eek:

Once you get a few Km. on it, say 150, change the oil and clean the filter yourself. Directions are in the tech section.
Do that again at 800 and 1,500 Km. YOURSELF! Keep cleaning the original filter with gas or kerosene and a toothbrush at each oil change forever. (~ 65,000 Km.) That way you will NEVER have to worry about the wrong filter/top end destroyed syndrome.

At 100 miles (162 Km.) if the bike seems to be running a bit lean, you can use a deck screw to remove the plug from the pilot pilot jet and needle, gently screw the needle all the way in to bottom, then out 2.5 turns. The settings for NZ may be fine, but the US bikes are set really lean for emissions. If it's running fine, don't change it!

Once you get about 2,000 Km. on it, then you can start thinking about modifying things. My bike works just fine 100% stock except for re-jetting the main for 6,000 ft. altitude. One thing I would definitely recommend right away is handguards and an O or Z-ring chain. You won't have to adjust that chain more than once in 10,000 Km.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I would say bar risers to go along with the bigger foot pegs, given your height.

There's really no reason to have the dealer/shop do anything as long as you have some basic tools and are even a little bit mechanically inclined. These are really simple machines and almost any info you need is a web search away.

Enjoy the new bike!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
Welcome to the forum. Find out what front tire options are available where you live. If the stock front doesn’t meet your riding needs you’ll know what your options are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,599 Posts
I would imagine the shop is no more familiar with TW200s than the new buyer.
As such they may not bring much more expertise to fine tuning than an owner who reads this Forum.
Owners can do all the simple things themselves with some experience and confidence.

However... at 6'1" Harrild is likely a bit heavier than the target demograph Yamaha engineers envisioned. As such the stock fork oil amount is usually woefully inadequate for taller folks. Pay the shop to pull and disassemble the forks and add 10W oil to bring to about the 125mm or 130mm measured level. ( Many threads here discuss this in detail).

At 6'1" handlebar risers are a good idea for greater comfort & control. Same for better footpegs as mentioned. Both these are easily done by the owner or a shop.

Welcome!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
hi folks, tremendous site. Thanks to all who contribute, has confirmed my interest in tw200 to the point of buying a new one now.
no old ones kicking about here in New Zealand.
my question is this, having read a lot here about exhausts and jets, and the likes, I kinda feel that the bike might be best tweaked as stock, but I’m uncerTain exactly what to request done before I receive it.
i understand there’s a pilot screw adjustment etc?
so what can I ask them to do before I sign on the line?
theyre good guys, and very accommodating.
many thanks.
im at sea level, and it doesn’t get that cold in the winter less north.
im 6’1 and will be mostly gravel roads and short commute.
Harrild,
NOTHING!. Yes, do nothing YET! You have a brand new bike there. Get that thing out and ride it! If your weather is good, get it out and RIDE IT. Learn that bike BEFORE you go changing anything and spending money on something you quite possibly don't need. 99.99% of the TW's and, a zillion other motorcycles are released from the factory with a very lean operating condition. They are like that to allow for working with or, complying to SMOG rules across the nation.
And, if the techs in the shop VALUE their jobs, not one single tech, in any shop across the nation, will touch that mixture screw due to the fact that, not only could they loose their job but, the dealership can get in serious trouble too. Now, after any warranty is run out, well, I still doubt any shop will do it due to the fact that, the rules still apply whether or not a bike is under warranty or not. But, you may find one and, that's up to them to make any illegal adjustments.

A very large percentage of owners have done such an adjustment ourselves. It's not rocket science. The plug is in there to keep normal folks from messing with the setting. But, as you and all of us know, the simple removal of that plug allows for an adjustment that in about 99.999% of the bikes, makes them run considerably better. But again, the EPA and other feds have their rules.

I've not changed foot pegs from stock. So far, I've not found them to be any issue but, I've not tried any larger ones to really make an informed decision. I've thought about risers for the bars but again, so far, stock's been working. I'm 6' 2.5" and sit somewhat tall in the saddle and yes, the bars do seem a bit low. Maybe someday, I'll pick up a set of risers.

I'm not saying what others have suggested is bad or not needed, not at all. All I'm suggesting is for you to get used to your new bike, and its operating parameters, BEFORE jumping out and making alterations. You'll then know what works for you and maybe doesn't and, what might need to be changed or altered. Your choice. Good luck with your new Dub.
Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,599 Posts
New bike in New Zealand should come with a Warrant of Fitness good for three years. Initial, and subsequent annual inspections do not seem to include any emission related checks other than for excess smoke. As such mixture screw enrichment seems permissible.
Just don't have any load extend more than a meter in front or behind the TW...and don't let it touch the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,901 Posts
Agree, have the shop do nothing (except set it up right).
So stupidly simple that whether it is your first bike or your 100th you'll get more satisfaction and self confidence modding it the way you want bit-by-bit. Ride it a few hundred miles or KM's before doing or buying anything extra.
Get yourself a good helmet and gloves.

Foot peg replacement was the first thing I did BTW unless you are 10 years old :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Fantastic help! Thank you. Pegs and bar risers were on the radar for sure. Had settled on the dmo ones as they appear to be the best when taking into account quality plus work needed to install.
as for risers, I’m still at a loss as to which would suit better.
so you’re all right, I’ll put in the hours riding and go from gut.
really appreciate the guidance regarding the maintenance.
cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,482 Posts
I'm 6 ft. even, with long arms, and I found the Rox 2" Pivoting Risers to be perfect. I actually pivoted them forward about 1.5 inches and up 1.5 inches to get a better stance when standing on the pegs. The cables will fit with those, anything higher will need extensions.

When you start changing your own oil and cleaning the filter, be aware that the torque specs for both the drain bolt and the filter cap bolts are too high in the book. I use about 15% less to avoid eventual stretching of those bolts and difficulty loosening the drain bolt. Lots of horror stories in here that could have been easily avoided! Get yourself a torque wrench and use it!

You will find that the fork oil level is too low for your weight and they will bottom out easily. For me at 200 lbs., 130 mm turned out just right and you could probably avoid the entire procedure outlined in the tech write-ups by just adding 10 wt. fork oil to that level and trying it for a while. I'm not an aggressive rider, so I didn't need heavier springs. That's about an ounce or two of oil per side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,482 Posts
.... Pay the shop to pull and disassemble the forks and add 10W oil to bring to about the 125mm or 130mm measured level. ( Many threads here discuss this in detail).
WHAT?!!! Fred, you know as well as I do that almost no fork disassembly is necessary to add oil! All you need do is support the bike, extend the forks all the way, loosen the top triple tree pinch bolts, undo the top caps, collapse the forks completely and hold them there with tie downs, remove the spacers and springs, measure the oil level with a 1/8 wood dowel, add 10 wt. to 130 mm and reassemble.

I wouldn't let a shop do this if they paid ME three times the cost of a new bike!!!! :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Don't let the shop even touch your bike other than the routine set-up!!!!! :eek:

Once you get a few Km. on it, say 150, change the oil and clean the filter yourself. Directions are in the tech section.
Do that again at 800 and 1,500 Km. YOURSELF! Keep cleaning the original filter with gas or kerosene and a toothbrush at each oil change forever. (~ 65,000 Km.) That way you will NEVER have to worry about the wrong filter/top end destroyed syndrome.

At 100 miles (162 Km.) if the bike seems to be running a bit lean, you can use a deck screw to remove the plug from the pilot pilot jet and needle, gently screw the needle all the way in to bottom, then out 2.5 turns. The settings for NZ may be fine, but the US bikes are set really lean for emissions. If it's running fine, don't change it!

Once you get about 2,000 Km. on it, then you can start thinking about modifying things. My bike works just fine 100% stock except for re-jetting the main for 6,000 ft. altitude. One thing I would definitely recommend right away is handguards and an O or Z-ring chain. You won't have to adjust that chain more than once in 10,000 Km.

yes to all comments, especially if you do a lot of off road, never really had a issue with foot pegs , but I don’t do much off road in England and I have quite small feet :ROFLMAO:/QUOTE]
As already said plenty info and fellow members here to help whenever you require it , even if you think at the time of posting you may feel it’s a stupid question to ask , don’t be shy , we have all said some dumb things , so you will fit in ok , enjoy the tdub , it will give you loads of :ROFLMAO:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,583 Posts
hi folks, tremendous site. Thanks to all who contribute, has confirmed my interest in tw200 to the point of buying a new one now.
no old ones kicking about here in New Zealand.
my question is this, having read a lot here about exhausts and jets, and the likes, I kinda feel that the bike might be best tweaked as stock, but I’m uncerTain exactly what to request done before I receive it.
i understand there’s a pilot screw adjustment etc?
so what can I ask them to do before I sign on the line?
theyre good guys, and very accommodating.
many thanks.
im at sea level, and it doesn’t get that cold in the winter less north.
im 6’1 and will be mostly gravel roads and short commute.

i agree, don't let the shop do anything, except maybe remove the cap over the idle adjuster on the carb. we don't know what the smog rules are in your neck of the woods, so just ride it and see how it runs, it maybe fine. they might not lean them out over there. as far as doing anything else to your bike, fly at it, you will get addicted along with the rest of us, it is a disease of the soul. i have 1.7 kms on my bike and have made 22 changes to it, its a sickness i tell you! but what a way to spend the winter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,583 Posts
I'm 6 ft. even, with long arms, and I found the Rox 2" Pivoting Risers to be perfect. I actually pivoted them forward about 1.5 inches and up 1.5 inches to get a better stance when standing on the pegs. The cables will fit with those, anything higher will need extensions.

When you start changing your own oil and cleaning the filter, be aware that the torque specs for both the drain bolt and the filter cap bolts are too high in the book. I use about 15% less to avoid eventual stretching of those bolts and difficulty loosening the drain bolt. Lots of horror stories in here that could have been easily avoided! Get yourself a torque wrench and use it!

You will find that the fork oil level is too low for your weight and they will bottom out easily. For me at 200 lbs., 130 mm turned out just right and you could probably avoid the entire procedure outlined in the tech write-ups by just adding 10 wt. fork oil to that level and trying it for a while. I'm not an aggressive rider, so I didn't need heavier springs. That's about an ounce or two of oil per side.
good advice, only problem with just adding oil is the fact that both forks come from the factory with different amounts in the forks. 2 of my bikes, both had 150 and 160 cc in them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,124 Posts
WHAT?!!! Fred, you know as well as I do that almost no fork disassembly is necessary to add oil! All you need do is support the bike, extend the forks all the way, loosen the top triple tree pinch bolts, undo the top caps, collapse the forks completely and hold them there with tie downs, remove the spacers and springs, measure the oil level with a 1/8 wood dowel, add 10 wt. to 130 mm and reassemble.

I wouldn't let a shop do this if they paid ME three times the cost of a new bike!!!! :eek:
I've done several pairs of forks and I never found it that easy. Putting that cap back in under spring tension seems to be the hard part. I usually get help. I use a bar clamp to compress the spring and get the cap in place. Someone mentioned to mark the screw with a mark of some type so you will know exactly where the thread start point will match up which will make it much easier if you attempt this. I have had the cap shoot off on a bike before so be careful if attempting this yourself. To me it is worth taking the forks off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,482 Posts
Hmm. As long as the forks are fully extended I never had that problem. I just got the wrench on them and used the palm of my other hand to compress the 1/2 inch until I could feel the threads engage and slowly and gently turned the wrench to be sure not to cross-thread the caps.

Grewen is right, my first TW had oil levels different by 8 mm. The second was within 2 mm. Of course oil should be added by height, not volume, which is much less accurate.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top