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Discussion Starter #1
My son was riding the White Rim trail the other day and didn't return home that night.
We weren't too concerned though because we assumed that he spent the night at his girlfriend's house.
But the following morning she called to say that he had never showed up at her place.
My wife immediately went into panic mode, and called the rangers up in I sky, and wanted my other son to fly over the trail to search.
But he explained to her that he wasn't allowed to launch the helicopter unless he received a call from the emergency response people.
So we drove up to I sky at 7am, and the rangers were just starting the search for him, one was going in a clockwise direction and the other in a counterclockwise direction.
About 10am we got word that he had broken down, and spent the night with a couple of guys at their camp, (an excellent steak dinner and multiple bottles of wine later)
So the ranger gave him a ride back to the visitor center, then he and I drove home and got my Jeep with the motorcycle carrier on the back, and returned to the trail and recovered his bike, it quit running near Candlestick tower.
But he had a good night out on the trail, (he ate better than the meal he would have had at home)
But if anyone is riding anywhere in the area and has a breakdown, give me a call and I will try to come and recover you and your bike.
My number is 435/220/0576
On the way out from Candlestick to Mineral Bottom, a tourist from Switzerland flagged us down, he had rented a mountain bike and was riding the White Rim on his own, but he injured his knee and couldn't ride anymore, so we gave him a ride back to town.
It didn't take long to pay the favor forward, from the fine folks who hosted my son the previous night.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Xracer,
That is something I've considered.
I know there are sat phones and spot receivers or whatever they're called.
And maybe other ways to make emergency contact, I need to check into them and do something.
I do have a ham radio, but I'm not really sure how to use it.
And I don't know if it would have worked in that location, but with the repeater towers it might have.
 

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Bob, a.k.a. bad luck, is another impressive & helpful gentleman, so I am not surprised he rode to the rescue. Bob sure helped me last visit to Moab. So save his number and hope you never need to use it...but if you do you will be treated to meeting a really nice guy with a really nice shop.
One of the nice things about our backcountry sport is most everyone we meet out there tends to be very helpful when needed. Back in the city how many of us would expect to be offered a meal and a bed if broken down and knocking on a stranger's door?
Of note: The White Rim Trail is a hundred plus mile 4x4 trail deep in the Green and Colorodo River canyons far from any civilized amenities like cell phone coverage or pizza delivery.

Limited sky view of geosynchronous nav satellite network down in those canyons likely limits connection and response time of all Spot & In-Reach type rescue aids. All this technology has limitations so blind faith in them is foolish.
 

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My son was riding the White Rim trail the other day and didn't return home that night.
We weren't too concerned though because we assumed that he spent the night at his girlfriend's house.
But the following morning she called to say that he had never showed up at her place.
My wife immediately went into panic mode, and called the rangers up in I sky, and wanted my other son to fly over the trail to search.
But he explained to her that he wasn't allowed to launch the helicopter unless he received a call from the emergency response people.
So we drove up to I sky at 7am, and the rangers were just starting the search for him, one was going in a clockwise direction and the other in a counterclockwise direction.
About 10am we got word that he had broken down, and spent the night with a couple of guys at their camp, (an excellent steak dinner and multiple bottles of wine later)
So the ranger gave him a ride back to the visitor center, then he and I drove home and got my Jeep with the motorcycle carrier on the back, and returned to the trail and recovered his bike, it quit running near Candlestick tower.
But he had a good night out on the trail, (he ate better than the meal he would have had at home)
But if anyone is riding anywhere in the area and has a breakdown, give me a call and I will try to come and recover you and your bike.
My number is 435/220/0576
On the way out from Candlestick to Mineral Bottom, a tourist from Switzerland flagged us down, he had rented a mountain bike and was riding the White Rim on his own, but he injured his knee and couldn't ride anymore, so we gave him a ride back to town.
It didn't take long to pay the favor forward, from the fine folks who hosted my son the previous night.
Guess it's time to throw away all the locator beacon devices. Who needs them when you get steak and wine when you breakdown in the middle of Mars. I'll take that...as long as I'm not the one being eyeballed as the steak. :p

On the rescue/recovery story, everyone is awesome. Brings a big smile to my face to hear of all the goodness which came out of this. This was a big deal and I bet all but especially your son, your family and the Switzerland tourist are really glad of the outcome.

I feel like I owe you and it wasn't even me.




TW Fever, Catch it!
 

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The specific good choice for gear is somewhat a function of your location. Whar works good in one place may be inapplicable elsewhere. Satellite triangulation isn't always reliable when there isn't a large enough clear sky view. Elsewhere cell coverage is plenty good enough. Visual and audible signals assume there is someone close enough to notice your summons. Same for radio coms since so many have forgone ham, FM, SSB,CB, FSR etc in favor of cell so few are monitoring airwaves these days.
However what does work universally is what Bob's son did: he let other's who care know of his intended route and timetable.
 

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However what does work universally is what Bob's son did: he let other's who care know of his intended route and timetable.
Nailed it!!! ^^^^^This absolutely is the best +++++


However, why am I on the computer right now instead of out riding right now? Time to checkout and go for a spin!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Stop it Fred, you're making me blush like a little girl.
But riding the White Rim alone really isn't bad, the rangers patrol at least once a day, and the people who drive it are all pretty good at helping out.
Kris, I know that you and everyone else on this forum would do whatever you could to help someone in need.
That is why this is the best group of people I know of.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi Moabman,
First of all it wasn't a tdub, he was riding his Suzuki ds400.
But it just died on him while he was riding it, and he tried to restart it but couldn't get it to fire at all.
And he is fairly new at this so he didn't know what to do.
After getting it back home, he pulled the spark plug, and put in a fresh one.
And it fired right up.
So he learned that you need to carry a spare plug.
I have told him to carry some tools and spare parts, but learning the hard way is often the best way.
At least he won't forget from now on.
 

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I bought a Garmin inReach Explorer+ this summer before an Alaska Adventure my wife and I went on. We spent many days away from civilization. Good thing with this is you can text or email via satellite and not just in an emergency situation. If you are in trouble, there is an SOS feature and someone will communicate with you until SAR shows up. You pay a monthly fee but can put it on hold each month you don't use it. Also has GPS, compass, maps, weather updates and other helpful stuff. My initial purchase was strictly for emergency backcountry rescue but I am glad to have it just to let people know I am ok when off into the wilderness, often by myself. I highly recommended it.
 

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Fred- I agree. You need to take care of yourself. Can't count on others to save your ass when it counts. Don't rely on techinology. But add technology to your "go bag" as another tool that might save you when no one else is around. I can count on myself and my own skills when the SHTF. No one else to blame but myself and my own actions for the situation. But I will put all available options in my "go bag" to help save my ass when it needs saving.

Safe travels- EatElk. 🙂
 

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Beautiful thread touching on many important topics & showing the bright side of humanity. I love doing solo stuff of all kinds & have always been lucky & gotten home under my own power & in one piece, more or less. However, the difference between a small inconvenience & a major problem can be as little as not having a buddy along for the adventure. Not all places are as well traveled as the White Rim & in many you might not see another person until it is too late. The choice always remains in our own hands. Choose wisely & live for another day.
 

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Good point. You could die of thirst & exposure all too soon there. It always amazes me how quickly heaven can transform into Hell when you are having too much fun. Stuff happens.
 

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For the vast majority of world's population that has no idea what acronym ABDSP means author is referring to 916 square mile Anza-Berrego Desert State Park located in southern California named after spanish explorer Juan Batista and a sheep ( berrego) [/COLOR] Anza Bugs.jpg
 
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