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Discussion Starter #1
I was going to experiment with the carburetor on my TW with the 70mm Wiseco Piston and the MegaCycle camshaft. I am trying to get the low end performance to be a little better even though I am very satisfied with the mid and upper range performance. Since I put the camshaft break in grease on the camshaft I decided it was time to change the oil -- and that is when my troubles started.

Long story short I bought a new six sided 19mm Craftsman socket hoping it would grip the end of the drain plug well enough to unscrew it. It held but the drain plug didn't.

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Next I tried a chisel on the outer edge of the plug. Problem with that is the chisel has to be angled towards the center of the plug or it slides off. Basically it didn't work.
The next idea was to drill a hole so I could angle the chisel in the direction the plug turns and that worked perfectly. Two not very hard taps and off it came.
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Discussion Starter #2
Now I need a new plug. My thoughts were that it will be 5 days to a week before I get one. I looked through all my spare parts and I knew there wasn't a plug there but I was hoping. Then as I was putting everything away I looked down on the floor and saw the engine block TW Brian gave to me a long time ago. YAHOO!!!! The first words out of my mouth were "THANK YOU TW BRIAN!" I grabbed a wrench and said to myself "please, please, please don't be on there tight!" and it wasn't tight at all. Barely finger tight! YAHOO and thanks again!!!!!

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As an added bonus the screen inside TW Brian's block was in much better shape than the one I had so I used it.

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Anyway, that has been my day so far. From bad luck to good luck with the help of a gift TW Brian gave me 2 or 3 years ago. Thanks again Brian. One never knows what affect his deeds done today will have some time in the future. Tony
 

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Whew! Glad that worked out!

Not casting aspersions, but just curious...

...did you use a torque wrench when installing the drain plug?
 

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Great!

These thing happen.

As an aside, I did an engine and rear drive oil change on a newly purchased but used Yamaha Zuma 125. I think both drain plugs had torque settings in the teens.

31 ft/lbs sounds like a typical number, however, and I think you may have just had the bad luck of a poorly cast drain plug.
 

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My luck with torque wrenches is if it starts at 20 ' lbs and the torque is 30' lbs don't use it. I have twisted bolts off when the torque wrench didn't click and passed up the torque. I use the old fashioned needle type torque wrench for lower torques that are usually about 15-30' lbs.
 

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Good fix. You could have drilled another hole about 180° from the first one you drilled and used something between them. I've gone to die grinding or dremeling with a cutoff wheel and making a slot in broken or stripped bolts with good luck. Of course any technique that works is a winner!
 

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My luck with torque wrenches is if it starts at 20 ' lbs and the torque is 30' lbs don't use it. I have twisted bolts off when the torque wrench didn't click and passed up the torque. I use the old fashioned needle type torque wrench for lower torques that are usually about 15-30' lbs.
At a seminar on aircraft maintenance we were reminded that torque wrenches should be calibrated annually. The instructor said he waited for torque wrenches to go on sale at Harbor Freight (!) and simply replaced them every year. On sale they're right around $10, so it's cheaper than calibrating one.

I'm on my second set. I buy one 3/8" drive and one 1/2" drive to cover most common settings. I'm paranoid enough, that whenever I set a torque setting, I walk over to my bench vise, clamp the drive in the jaws and pull to the "click". First, to make sure it's working. Second, to make sure it "feels" right.

As an aside, I also have a much smaller, beam-type 1/4" drive for very low settings. Gets used mainly on smaller bicycle fittings, and is marked in newton-meters.
 

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Both Ken and Fast Eddie have good points. Click type torque wrenches are most accurate in the middle two thirds of their range. I'm lucky, I can go over to Les Schwab Tires and have mine checked for free. (Not calibrated, just checked). Then I can write down a correction factor for future use. I have dropped my 1/2 inch once or twice in the 30 years I've owned it and I sometimes use it to break loose bolts or nuts, which is a real NO NO, but I set it way higher than I expect the break loose force to be. Very bad, but I no longer work on aircraft, so the penalty clause is much less! :eek:
 

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It looks like the oil drain cover is made of cast zinc and that may be the reason so many are having trouble getting if off at times.Two different metals. I think Yamaha saved some pennies instead of making it out of aluminum. Has anyone tried putting aluminum anti seize on the threads? I think that would stop the stiction on the threads. Another option and farkle opportunity would be a cnc 'd aluminum oil drain cover.
 

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Has anyone tried putting aluminum anti seize on the threads? I think that would stop the stiction on the threads.

Just beware that torque values are for "dry" fasteners, unless otherwise specified.

Of course, good luck with "dry" threads on an oil drain plug! Still, anti-seize could have some effects and might result in an over-torqued plug.
 

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I had a Inch pound Torque Wrench that did not click well torquing my bolts that hold the primary cover on my Harley. It was a really bad Day. :drunk:
 

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I am pretty positive this is not an over torque problem but a dissimilar metals issue. If the drain plug were made out of aluminum or brass we wouldn't be seeing these threads on striped, rounded off and stuck drain plugs. Just sayin my opinion. That's why I mentioned aluminum anti seize. Try it no more stuck drain plugs. Even better would be an aluminum drain plug end of problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I put a new o-ring on the "new" plug. As I tightened it I could feel the o-ring compressing. When I got to metal on metal -- as in the outer edge of the plug contacting the block -- I made it just a little bit tighter, maybe just 10 ft-lbs. I will see what it is like to remove in 1500 miles.......
 

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This is a great thread BTW. Nice job on removing a stuck oil drain plug elime. We also had members giving parts to other members ( even though earlier) and some great info on torque wrenches. Which everyone who works on their bikes should have one or two in different ranges. There have been too many mentions about rounded off and stuck drain plugs. I have done only 6 oil changes 3 on two bikes and have been very careful on tightening the plugs. Out of those 6 one was extremely tight. Maybe the problem is over torquing becase oil is on the threads of the plug. but I think as I said earlier it is because the plug seems to be made from cast zinc and those threads are getting stuck on the case due to there being two different metals. That's just my crazy idea. On my next oil change I am going to try some anti seize on the drain plugs. I already have some aluminum anti seize that I use and put a tiny amount of on my spark plugs threads. In my VW days sometimes the steel threaded spark plugs would react in the aluminum head and strip the threads until we put steel thread incerts in the heads.
 

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For what it is worth, I've found the wrench that comes with the TW works wonderfully on the oil drain plug.
I guess it doesn't help much if you didn't get a kit, or if you want to torque it to a specific measurement. I tighten it to snug and call it good.
 
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