TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
EDIT (01/04): See post #30 on page three.




EDIT: Also, for mostly target shooting/plinking, but also possibly (hopefully not) personal protection/home defense (I know, you think I'm crazy and that that's a terrible idea) which of these do you think is the best version, and why: California Compliant I am leaning toward the Practical URX. I like the Camper Stainless UFX, but think that I might prefer the Truglo front sight that comes on the Practical (but maybe not; I'm not sure yet...).




Some of you will have read about my issues with my new Savage Arms 64F. I'm still working on that, but in the meantime, seriously considering a different firearm. I've been trying to find the most reliable, currently produced, .22 LR semi auto in existence; the Browning Buck Mark keeps popping up, and I've read a lot of good things on its reliability. Of course, I read a fair bit about how great the Savage was supposed to be, too.

Does anyone here have personal experience with a Buck Mark? What do you think of it's reliability/durability? Can I just perform a basic cleaning every 500 rounds (EDIT: maybe every 250 rounds is better?) and expect 5,000 rounds out of it without issues?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
I have the Browning carbine which is basically the pistol with a stock and a long barrel and have had it over 10 years with no malfunctions .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
The one my dad had ~30 years ago shot well.
Probably cleaned after every 300 rounds or so.
Is this strictly for target shooting?
If so, have you considered a revolver?

My great aunt in Texas has a .22 auto rifle, circa early sixties, which never seemed to be cleaned (quite contrary to what my dad taught me).
When we visited, she would hand it to me, with a box of ammo and send me out on her ranch to reduce the armadillo population.
Never misfed or failed to fire.

I had a Browning hi-power (9mm), made in Belgium that I decided to test how long I could go without cleaning.
It was carried when dirt biking, circa the seventies, so it was exposed to considerable dust.
After about a year of regular use and I don't know how many off-road miles, it finally stove-piped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
My wife owns a buck mark 22 pistol. Bull barrel. We have only had it 2 years, but zero stovepipes or misfires. Precise as well. Granted, that is only 1 gun out of a million buck marks, but we like it alot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,719 Posts
I had a buck mark in the late eighties and early nineties. I shortened the ten inch barrel to compete in bullseye pistol competition. It was very accurate but a bit picky about ammunition. I sometimes failed with match ammo but was okay with full power stuff. It was quite accurate and easy to work on.
It was lost or stolen somewhere in Northern Idaho. Let me know if you ever come across one with a two inch shorter than stock barrel.
In the competition I was in, a ten inch barrel was not legal so I shortened to 8 inches and crown beveled the muzzle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I had a buck mark in the late eighties and early nineties. I shortened the ten inch barrel to compete in bullseye pistol competition. It was very accurate but a bit picky about ammunition. I sometimes failed with match ammo but was okay with full power stuff. It was quite accurate and easy to work on.
It was lost or stolen somewhere in Northern Idaho. Let me know if you ever come across one with a two inch shorter than stock barrel.
In the competition I was in, a ten inch barrel was not legal so I shortened to 8 inches and crown beveled the muzzle.
New Buck Marks come with 7.25 or 5.5 inch barrels; are you looking for shorter than that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Been utilizing a Buck Mark for 25 years, hope I can for another 25.
Cannot recall if it ever jammed, but I do clean it every couple hundred rounds.
More accurate than I can hold. It does have a preference for Rem Viper cartridges, but handles everything pretty well.
Overall, a great firearm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
The one my dad had ~30 years ago shot well.
Probably cleaned after every 300 rounds or so.
Is this strictly for target shooting?
If so, have you considered a revolver?

My great aunt in Texas has a .22 auto rifle, circa early sixties, which never seemed to be cleaned (quite contrary to what my dad taught me).
When we visited, she would hand it to me, with a box of ammo and send me out on her ranch to reduce the armadillo population.
Never misfed or failed to fire.

I had a Browning hi-power (9mm), made in Belgium that I decided to test how long I could go without cleaning.
It was carried when dirt biking, circa the seventies, so it was exposed to considerable dust.
After about a year of regular use and I don't know how many off-road miles, it finally stove-piped.
My first choice, before I changed my mind and bought the Savage Arms rifle, had been the Ruger LCR in 22 LR. However, I really don't want a gun with a heavy trigger, which is what ultimately steered me away from the LCR. About 7 or 8 pounds is as high as I would want -- preferably 6 pounds or lower. I'm also really not big on any gun without a manual safety. Other than those two factors, I really like the idea of revolvers. Still semi-automatic but you don't have to worry about failure to feed or eject, and failure to fire means you just pull the trigger again. I really like all of that, but do not want a heavy trigger or lack of manual safety. It's unfortunate; I basically love some things about 22LR revolvers (the LCR holds 8 in the cylinder!), and hate other things about them.

One exception to all of this, that I have always really liked and will probably buy at some point is the North American Arms mini revolver in 22LR. That little gun is absolutely wonderful!

By the way...somewhat off topic: why does no one make a revolver rifle (I think there used to be some). I think a 22LR revolver-action semi-auto rifle could be really cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
My wife owns a buck mark 22 pistol. Bull barrel. We have only had it 2 years, but zero stovepipes or misfires. Precise as well. Granted, that is only 1 gun out of a million buck marks, but we like it alot.
Is this considered a bull barrel (second photo)? Buck Mark Practical URX - California Compliant I'm not yet sure exactly what the differences are between bull barrels and standard barrels??

Do you have an opinion on bull barrells/carbon steel vs stainless steel, as to which is better/why?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
They make a lot of different models. Best thing is to find a Browning dealer that stocks many of them and go fondle them.

I have 5, including the rifle, my go to auto is an older slab sided barrel Buckmark similar to the newer Buck Mark Standard URX. I don't like hi-viz sirght on a target, hunting or plinking handgun, they can be a distraction, fine on a self defense gun tho. My go everywhere, do everything, beat to hell and get it wet and muddy pistol is a stainless Ruger Single Six 6.5''?? barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Do you have an opinion on bull barrells/carbon steel vs stainless steel, as to which is better/why?
I prefer stainless for rust resistance.

At this point in my life (age 70) , my wife and I only have one revolver each and a .308 single shot rifle.
The revolvers are Ruger GP100, 3" stainless steel .357.
We target shoot about once a month, mostly with .38 ammo.
Revolvers are loaded for an escalating situation:
2 rounds of .38 snake shot
2 rounds of .38 hollow point
2 rounds of .357 hollow point

With a revolver, it is easy to cock and gentle release twice to bypass the snake shot (we have mountain lions on our ranch in Arizona and wife has experienced an interesting encounter with a fox).

My son, who is a contractor for the Federal Protection agency, likes semi-auto for concealed carry, but his favorite gun to shoot is a .357, given to him by my dad.

Although not the best for concealed carry, here are my reasons for liking a revolver:
a. Never had a feed or fire issue with either Ruger, over 17 years (although S&W can have an issue with ejector pin coming unscrewed and cylinder not rotating easily)
b. 357 can fire .357 or .38, for which there is a huge variety and my dad loaded a lifetime supply of #9 snake shot
c. most autos will not repeat fire snake shot
d. no need to collect brass off the ground after shooting...just eject into a box or whatever
e. very easy to clean

Just my few cents
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I think I would save up and get the Ruger MK IV. I think those Buck Marks are made of pot metal. They are cheap for a reason. JMMHO.
Unfortunately, the Ruger .22 pistols aren't California legal. If they were, I would certainly have been considering an MK. There is a very short list of California-legal .22 pistols; my options are very limited :(


From everything I have read so far, the Browning is looking like it may be the most reliable pistol on the list...still far from perfect, of course. I fear that there is a decent chance of getting stuck with a lemon, with any of those options. It's pretty pathetic if you ask me. Other opinions welcomed!

http://certguns.doj.ca.gov/ (select "sort by caliber")
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
the Ruger is not legal?? whats the reason for that, its a 10 rd mag. must be something to do with Ruger not submitting it, money or something. they have all kinds of other junk on there.
Yea, I'm not sure...quite possibly a simple lack of submission for testing/certification (I'm sure that costs bundles of money and forces them to significantly increase MSRP for CA models, to recoup the expense).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
I also have a Browning BuckMark which I purchased last year. I purchased it from Cabela's and chose this over the Ruger because it fit my hand better. I'm glad I did. As others have noted, it can be picky on ammunition-but only with respect to accuracy. I'm not sure why this is. I have fired various different brands of ammo and have finally settled on CCI ammo because it was the only ammo available here locally for awhile. I did have to move the rear sight a bit to get it dialed in to my liking, but that was it. It shoots great, and has a lifetime warranty on it so I wouldn't worry about getting a lemon. Fit and finish are exceptional in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Have you considered moving to say... Arizona?
Actually, I have. I hate some of the laws in this state. I'm not sure how possible it would be for me, though (definitely not in the short term).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
I also have a Browning BuckMark which I purchased last year. I purchased it from Cabela's and chose this over the Ruger because it fit my hand better. I'm glad I did. As others have noted, it can be picky on ammunition-but only with respect to accuracy. I'm not sure why this is. I have fired various different brands of ammo and have finally settled on CCI ammo because it was the only ammo available here locally for awhile. I did have to move the rear sight a bit to get it dialed in to my liking, but that was it. It shoots great, and has a lifetime warranty on it so I wouldn't worry about getting a lemon. Fit and finish are exceptional in my opinion.
I'll probably never bother shooting anything other than CCI mini mags or possibly velocitors (from a rifle). Thanks for the info on your Browning. After adjusting the sight, does your point of impact generally/roughly equal your point of aim, with the Buck Mark? It sounds like yes, but if not, are you okay with it being off a bit and just adjusting your aim accordingly?
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top