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Does anyone know if there is a way to tell if an o-ring is Buna-N by looking at it or analyzing it in some way (preferably without destroying it)?
 

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I found this at http://www.hydraulicspneumatics.com/200/Issue/Article/False/6504/Issue



Tool identifies O-ring material



Almost by definition, all O-ring seals look pretty much alike. With some basic measuring devices, a mixed bag of O-rings can be sorted by size, but how can you identify their material for chemical compatibility - and do it without destroying the O-ring? One way: use the ORID 70-C O-ring identifier, built by Bachus Instrument Co., Nashville.



Just hold this simple tool - which is about the size of a pencil - in a vertical orientation with its bottom end against an O-ring of unknown material that is lying flat on a table or desk. Slide the tool's internal weight to the top of its slot and release it. The straight edge at the bottom of the weight should drop directly on the O-ring cross-section so that the edge strikes and bounces off that cross-section's arc. Watch the height of the first bounce when the weight rebounds off the O-ring. Marks inscribed along the slot identify Viton, Kalrex, nitrile or Buna-N, and ethylene propylene. Because minor differences in operator technique may produce variations in bounce, it's best to take multiple readings.



The stainless-steel ORID 70-C will accurately read 100, 200, 300, and 400 Series (0.103 to 0.275 in.) cross-section O-rings with durometer hardness of 60, 70, or 80. Note that the surface supporting the O-ring should be hard and rigid. The ORID 70-C tool should not be used with damaged or failed O-rings, or O-rings older than their indicated shelf life, and it cannot identify material correctly that is not in an O-ring configuration.


I'm thinking that if I get a known Buna-N oring, and then I take the oring in question, and I get something similar to the tool above to bounce off of them, then if they bounce to about the same height, that I will know that the oring in question is Buna-N. Or, I guess I could buy the tool, but that would be too easy.



What's interesting is according to the tool the next step down from a Buna-N in terms of chemical resistance is an EP o-ring, which says it's only able to deal with basically water, so I'm curious now as to what kind of o-ring the old bikes from the 70's and earlier used that could handle gasoline, but could not handle E10 gas?
 

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Does anyone know if there is a way to tell if an o-ring is Buna-N by looking at it or analyzing it in some way (preferably without destroying it)?
That's a Qwerty question.



I had three o-rings for my BMW that were made from 3 different materials. Looking at them they seemed identical.



jb
 

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Take a known good o-ring that fits to and industrial seal supply and buy new ones in the material of choice. They are cheap enough it isn't worth the money buying a tool.
 
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