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now that i have replaced the stock exhaust on my tw200 with a DG slip on,its very obvious that i need to do some carb rejetting. ive found several websites which have info and most of them have different info. a website called jetsrus.com has the main jet listed as a #126. and the slow/pilot jet is listed as a #31. is that correct? do the numbers tell you how big the hole is? if my tw200 is running lean with stock jets than what size jets should i get? what about the needle, does that need to be changed or adjusted in anyway? any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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just go up 1 size and see how see runs. I only have tuned to the stock exhaust and my riding preference. One change at a time. Then the piolot can be played with
 

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I posted the general concepts of jetting carbs in the sticky at the top of this forum. The best main for your bike can only be determined by experimentation. Adjust your main by the symptoms listed in the sticky. If you have no symptoms, you might try for a performance gain by changing to one size bigger or smaller, but without symptoms, there's probably not much to be gained.



I've also posted a list of all Yamaha main jets that will physically fit a TW, and some that might. #125, #126, #128, #132, and #132.5 mains have been used in various 2001 to current TW200s, depending on year and the particular market. Oddly, most I've jetted like the #130 main (not actually used on any TW200 best I know) best at low altitudes, and the #125 was a bit rich above 11,000 feet even with the air box lid drilled. If you want to use some other manufacturer's main jets to try to save a buck or two, you're on your own--I refuse to mess with them because they aren't worth the cost in time wasted.



But I echo myself redundantly over and over again once more repeatedly.
 

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It kind of reminds me of that time the record skipped during the infamous Milli-Vanilli concert. Poor old Rob and Fab kept lip synching the same line, over and over and over again.
 

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"Jeti Master"?



BAAWAAHAAHAHAAHAAHAA!!!



Between you and lizrdbrth .... .























I love warped senses of humor.
 

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I guess you had to read that one twice




not warped, just trying to lighten up the "uptight world" one post at a time
 

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Discussion Starter #8
sorry im not a do it your self kind guy! not so lucky for me i have to pay the stealership to do this work.i cant just buy jets and start pulling my carb apart. the last thing i need is to be picked on in a forum because i dont understand what content is already on the forum. but hey, thanks for the help.
 

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sorry im not a do it your self kind guy! not so lucky for me i have to pay the stealership to do this work.i cant just buy jets and start pulling my carb apart. the last thing i need is to be picked on in a forum because i dont understand what content is already on the forum. but hey, thanks for the help.


I don't think anybody meant to pick on you, zannini. It's more of an inside joke type of thing. Hang in there, you'll get that carb dialed in.
 

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I think it's more important that you understand that there's a good possibilty that you need to rejet and are addressing that.



I would be interested in hearing about your experience with the dealer in terms of how they approach the task, the costs involved, etc. It would help those contemplating aftermarket exhausts make informed decisions based on their skillsets, no?
 

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I don't think anybody meant to pick on you, zannini. It's more of an inside joke type of thing. Hang in there, you'll get that carb dialed in.


Sorry if it came across wrong, I was actually picking on QWERTY... as pointed out above, inside joke.



I did try to answer you question, I would try upsizing the main jet with yamaha OEM parts only. jet #116 or 118. early modle carb. pre 2001
 

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just go up 1 size and see how she runs. I only have tuned to the stock exhaust and my riding preference. One change at a time. Then the piolot can be played with


Also, keep in mind if you live in a area that requires emission testing, a richer running carb will fail.. just fyi
 

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now that i have replaced the stock exhaust on my tw200 with a DG slip on,its very obvious that i need to do some carb rejetting. ive found several websites which have info and most of them have different info. a website called jetsrus.com has the main jet listed as a #126. and the slow/pilot jet is listed as a #31. is that correct? do the numbers tell you how big the hole is? if my tw200 is running lean with stock jets than what size jets should i get? what about the needle, does that need to be changed or adjusted in anyway? any help would be greatly appreciated!


What area of the planet do you reside in?. I just completed the rejet and needle "shiming"....big difference!.I'm not a mechanically inclined person either......I did this and so can you. Probably the most difficult part for me was to get the carb back in place...tight fit.I ride between 400 and 1200 ft above sea level....I used the #130(main jet) and five .010" shims on the needle..... did not have to use a different size pilot jet....there ususally is enough adjustment on the "pilot screw" to accomplish the task. So far the TW is running alot stronger and have noticed a huge improvement in the bike when approaching and surpassing 55 mph.....it's kinda like the 5th gear "got taller". Hopefully I had beginners luck and all will be well.....you can do this.



I feel your pain on the question asking subject also.
 

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Yes, we are picking on you. Anybody who can't jet a carb, ..., just hasn't had the opportunity or desire to learn how, yet. There is a sticky at the top of this forum that gives general information and theory, part numbers, etc. The only difficult part is getting those ^$^&%$ float bowl and top cap screws off. Make a trip to a hardware store for stainless allen head replacements and the problem is permanently solved. Everything else is easy, as long as some thought goes in to how everything comes apart. I take pictures, and I rebuilt my first carb in 1963. Oh, one more thing, the carb leaks gas, so turn the petcock off and run it dry before disassembly. I do carb work on a metal tray the size of a McDonald's tray, covered with 3 layers of white paper towels. The towels contain any spills, and keep any surprise parts from falling out and bouncing away. I print off the parts explosion so I will know before loosening any screw if there is a little spring or ball or something that may fall out. I place each part on a bigger-than-life-size blow-up of the parts explosion in the orientation it came from the carb. Such a system is relatively easy to set up and makes carb work much, much less stressful.



I recommend motorcyclists learn to do their own wrenching. Otherwise, motorcycling is too expensive to enjoy.



#130 main and about 1.25mm spacer under the needle is about right for 400-1200ft altitude and a stock bike, even most with a pipe, as aftermarket pipes generally make more noise than anything else. Pilot screw adjustment is a 5-second deal with a 3-inch long power screwdriver bit. Just to gain confidence, a newbie might want to disconnect the throttle cables, rotate the carb, pop the cap, and try turning the pilot screw. The significant difference even such a simple, free mod makes will be very motivating to pursue more in-depth tuning.



zannini, TW200s have come with at least 7 different main jets, 2 different needles, and 2 different pilot jets from the factory, depending on year and market. I expect if yours has a #126 main then it is a '07 or newer 49-state North American market bike. Correct? Go back to jetsrus.com and see if they provide that information. No? Well, maybe they aren't intentionally lying, maybe what info they provide is truthfull, but it is very incomplete and misleading. Also, they are selling Keihin jets as direct replacements for Tekei jets. The flow characteristics of the two brands is definately different--a #130 Tekei flows different than a #130 Keihin, enough that a novice tuner will probably have poor results and become disgusted and frustrated.



Avoid "jet kits" and other "shortcuts". Most don't work as advertised.



Post your location. Maybe there's a Tdubber nearby who will coach you through your carb work. That's the best and easiest way to learn.
 

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Yes, we are picking on you. Anybody who can't jet a carb, ..., just hasn't had the opportunity or desire to learn how, yet. There is a sticky at the top of this forum that gives general information and theory, part numbers, etc. The only difficult part is getting those ^$^&%$ float bowl and top cap screws off. Make a trip to a hardware store for stainless allen head replacements and the problem is permanently solved. Everything else is easy, as long as some thought goes in to how everything comes apart. I take pictures, and I rebuilt my first carb in 1963. Oh, one more thing, the carb leaks gas, so turn the petcock off and run it dry before disassembly. I do carb work on a metal tray the size of a McDonald's tray, covered with 3 layers of white paper towels. The towels contain any spills, and keep any surprise parts from falling out and bouncing away. I print off the parts explosion so I will know before loosening any screw if there is a little spring or ball or something that may fall out. I place each part on a bigger-than-life-size blow-up of the parts explosion in the orientation it came from the carb. Such a system is relatively easy to set up and makes carb work much, much less stressful.



I recommend motorcyclists learn to do their own wrenching. Otherwise, motorcycling is too expensive to enjoy.



#130 main and about 1.25mm spacer under the needle is about right for 400-1200ft altitude and a stock bike, even most with a pipe, as aftermarket pipes generally make more noise than anything else. Pilot screw adjustment is a 5-second deal with a 3-inch long power screwdriver bit. Just to gain confidence, a newbie might want to disconnect the throttle cables, rotate the carb, pop the cap, and try turning the pilot screw. The significant difference even such a simple, free mod makes will be very motivating to pursue more in-depth tuning.



zannini, TW200s have come with at least 7 different main jets, 2 different needles, and 2 different pilot jets from the factory, depending on year and market. I expect if yours has a #126 main then it is a '07 or newer 49-state North American market bike. Correct? Go back to jetsrus.com and see if they provide that information. No? Well, maybe they aren't intentionally lying, maybe what info they provide is truthfull, but it is very incomplete and misleading. Also, they are selling Keihin jets as direct replacements for Tekei jets. The flow characteristics of the two brands is definately different--a #130 Tekei flows different than a #130 Keihin, enough that a novice tuner will probably have poor results and become disgusted and frustrated.



Avoid "jet kits" and other "shortcuts". Most don't work as advertised.



Post your location. Maybe there's a Tdubber nearby who will coach you through your carb work. That's the best and easiest way to learn.
 

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now that i have replaced the stock exhaust on my tw200 with a DG slip on,its very obvious that i need to do some carb rejetting. ive found several websites which have info and most of them have different info. a website called jetsrus.com has the main jet listed as a #126. and the slow/pilot jet is listed as a #31. is that correct? do the numbers tell you how big the hole is? if my tw200 is running lean with stock jets than what size jets should i get? what about the needle, does that need to be changed or adjusted in anyway? any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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First, why in the world would you put a non stock exhaust on this little bike ? Second, now that you have made the bike much leaner than stock and decreased your bottom end power and and torque what do expect to accomplish ? Put the stock exhaust back on and enjoy the ride. This bike is not a hot rod
 

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First, why in the world would you put a non stock exhaust on this little bike ? Second, now that you have made the bike much leaner than stock and decreased your bottom end power and and torque what do expect to accomplish ? Put the stock exhaust back on and enjoy the ride. This bike is not a hot rod


C'mon goose, how are we going to keep up with the Ninjas if we leave our bikes stock?
 
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